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Pharmacology - Environment - 31.12.2019
The ten most popular Imperial news stories of 2019
As the decade comes to an end, we reflect on the stories that spiked your interest and topped the 'most read articles' chart this year. Ranked by page views, here are your favourite stories of 2019: 10. Mystery arthritis-linked knee bone three times more common than 100 years ago Imperial News Is it time to adjust the official number of bones in the human body? In April, researchers found that the small fabella bone, once thought to be a relic of the past, has made a comeback over the last century.

Environment - Life Sciences - 30.12.2019
Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus
Life could have emerged from lakes with high phosphorus
Life as we know it requires phosphorus. It's one of the six main chemical elements of life, it forms the backbone of DNA and RNA molecules, acts as the main currency for energy in all cells and anchors the lipids that separate cells from their surrounding environment. But how did a lifeless environment on the early Earth supply this key ingredient? "For 50 years, what's called 'the phosphate problem,' has plagued studies on the origin of life,” said first author Jonathan Toner , a University of Washington research assistant professor of Earth and space sciences.

Environment - Transport - 23.12.2019
Capturing CO2 from trucks and reducing their emissions by 90%
Capturing CO2 from trucks and reducing their emissions by 90%
Researchers at EPFL have patented a new concept that could cut trucks' CO2 emissions by almost 90%. It involves capturing CO2 within the exhaust system, converting it into a liquid and storing it on the vehicle. The liquid CO2 would then be delivered to a service station and where it will be turned back into fuel using renewable energy.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.12.2019
From rocket builders to tree planters
From rocket builders to tree planters
The year 2019 has certainly been a busy one at ETH. A new president took office and the second Sci-Tech Oscar was awarded, along with other major prizes, but there were also plenty of inventions and topics for discussion. The new year also ushered in a new era at ETH. The former director of PSI, Joël Mesot, took over the reins of the Executive Board as the new President of ETH Zurich with a sense of "great elation, drive and enthusiasm for this venerable institution".

Environment - 20.12.2019
Pollution league tables for UK urban areas reveal the expected and unexpected
The Bedfordshire town of Luton has come bottom of a league table of predicted city-wide air pollution concentrations among UK cities, according to new analysis by the Universities of Birmingham and Lancaster. Although Luton's air pollution emissions are about as expected for its population, the town's compactness limits dispersal of pollution, meaning it drops to last place among the 146 most populous UK places in terms of predicted air pollution concentrations.

Environment - Life Sciences - 19.12.2019
Scientists uncover world's oldest forest
Scientists uncover world’s oldest forest
Scientists have discovered remnants of the world's oldest fossil forest in a sandstone quarry in Cairo, New York. It is believed the extensive network of trees, which would have spread from New York all the way into Pennsylvania and beyond, is around 386 million years old. This makes the Cairo forest around 2 or 3 million years older than what was thought to be the world's oldest forest at Gilboa, also in New York State and around 40 km away from the Cairo site.

Environment - Innovation - 19.12.2019
Experts create clean cold research hub to meet global challenge
Led by UK Universities, multi-disciplinary researchers from around the globe are joining forces in an innovative new research centre aimed at speeding up the use of radical new cooling solutions to help small-holder farmers, medicine suppliers and others make the most of clean and sustainable chilled distribution systems.

Environment - Chemistry - 19.12.2019
Open water in wintertime Arctic is changing its atmosphere
Open water in wintertime Arctic is changing its atmosphere
The Arctic is warming faster than any other place on Earth, and thanks to this, sea spray aerosols similar to what researchers see in California are being generated during the Arctic winter, according to a new University of Michigan study. Summertime Arctic sea ice cover is the second lowest on record, according to the Arctic report card 2019, produced by the National Snow and Ice Data Center, continuing its rapid decline over the past several decades.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 19.12.2019
Decade of Discovery
As December winds down, we mark not just the end of another year of discovery at Caltech but the conclusion of a decade of remarkable accomplishments and research breakthroughs.

Environment - Life Sciences - 19.12.2019
Genetic variation could help some species adapt to climate change
As climate change accelerates, the oceans are rapidly acidifying. An innovative new study by University of Chicago biologists shows that mussels raised in an acidic experimental environment grew smaller shells than those grown at normal levels, but the overall survival rate of mussels grown under both conditions was the same.

Life Sciences - Environment - 19.12.2019
Mealworms provide plastic solution
Mealworms are not only able to eat various forms of plastic, as previous research has shown, they can consume potentially toxic plastic additives in Styrofoam with no ill effects, a new study shows. The worms can then be used as a safe, protein-rich feed supplement. Tiny mealworms may hold part of the solution to our giant plastics problem.

Environment - 19.12.2019
Researchers produce first laser ultrasound images of humans
Researchers produce first laser ultrasound images of humans
Technique may help remotely image and assess health of infants, burn victims, and accident survivors in hard-to-reach places. For most people, getting an ultrasound is a relatively easy procedure: As a technician gently presses a probe against a patient's skin, sound waves generated by the probe travel through the skin, bouncing off muscle, fat, and other soft tissues before reflecting back to the probe, which detects and translates the waves into an image of what lies beneath.

Environment - 19.12.2019
A new way to remove contaminants from nuclear wastewater
A new way to remove contaminants from nuclear wastewater
Method concentrates radionuclides in a small portion of a nuclear plant's wastewater, allowing the rest to be recycled. Nuclear power continues to expand globally, propelled, in part, by the fact that it produces few greenhouse gas emissions while providing steady power output. But along with that expansion comes an increased need for dealing with the large volumes of water used for cooling these plants, which becomes contaminated with radioactive isotopes that require special long-term disposal.

Social Sciences - Environment - 18.12.2019
Depression and suicide risk linked to air pollution
People exposed to higher levels of air pollution are more likely to experience depression or die by suicide, finds a new analysis led by UCL. The first systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence connecting air pollution and a range of mental health problems, published in Environmental Health Perspectives , reviewed study data from 16 countries.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.12.2019
Healing rays: Whoopi's quick to mend
Healing rays: Whoopi’s quick to mend
‘Whoopi' the manta ray - a regular visitor to Western Australia's Ningaloo Reef - has helped University of Queensland and Murdoch University scientists study rays' impressive ability to heal. Whoopi, who has swum with thousands of tourists WA's over the years, was hit by a boat in 2015, suffering propeller cuts measuring up to 20 centimetres to the edge of her wing.

Environment - 18.12.2019
Perpetual predator-prey population cycles
Channels McGill University News and Events How can predators coexist with their prey over long periods without the predators completely depleting the resource that keeps them alive? Experiments performed over a period of 10 years by researchers from McGill University and the Universities of Oldenburg and Potsdam have now confirmed that regular oscillations in predator-prey populations can persist over very long periods "Because predators eat thei

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 17.12.2019
Why some planets eat their own skies
For many years, for all we knew, our solar system was alone in the universe. Then better telescopes began to reveal a treasure trove of planets circling distant stars.  In 2014, NASA's Kepler Space Telescope handed scientists a smorgasbord of more than 700 brand-new distant planets to study-many of them unlike what we had previously seen.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.12.2019
Rare species organize themselves into ghettos to survive
Rare species organize themselves into ghettos to survive
Researchers from UNIGE and Uméå show that to resist stronger species, rare animal and plant species group together in ghettos to help each other, maintaining biodiversity. How can you survive when your species has few representatives' An international team of researchers, led by the Universities of Umeå (Sweden) and Geneva (UNIGE, Switzerland), demonstrates that animal and plant communities are organized into ethnic neighbourhoods, where species in low abundance come together to strengthen their persistence against more competitive species.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.12.2019
Ancient events are still impacting mammals worldwide
Ancient events are still impacting mammals worldwide
Researchers find signatures of deep past in biodiversity patterns today In the first study of its kind, researchers have discovered that events from 20,000 years ago or more are still impacting the diversity and distribution of mammal species worldwide. "Our study shows that mammal biodiversity in the tropics and subtropics today is still being shaped by ancient human events and climate changes,” said study lead author John Rowan of the University of Massachusetts Amherst.

Palaeontology - Environment - 16.12.2019
Two in one: Fossil shells reveal both global mercury contamination and warming when dinosaurs perished
Two in one: Fossil shells reveal both global mercury contamination and warming when dinosaurs perished
The impact of an asteroid or comet is acknowledged as the principal cause of the mass extinction that killed off most dinosaurs and about three-quarters of the planet's plant and animal species 66 million years ago. But massive volcanic eruptions in India may also have contributed to the extinctions.
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