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Health - 20.05.2019
Using activity monitors to track cats’ activity levels
Does your cat live indoors' Researchers from the University of Bristol Vet School want to hear from indoor cat owners for a new study looking at cats' mobility levels using cat activity monitors. The researchers want to study the effect of joint disease on cats' activity levels by using activity monitors to measure the movements of cats with and without mobility problems.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.05.2019
A new non-invasive therapy for people with paraplegia
A new non-invasive therapy for people with paraplegia
Researchers from the Alberto Santos Dumont Association for Research Support (AASDAP) in Brazil, in collaboration with EPFL, have developed a non-invasive strategy that combines functional electrostimulation and a brain-machine interface to help people with paraplegia walk again. This rehabilitation approach was tested on two patients, who showed an improvement in their motor skills and a partial neurological recovery.

Pharmacology - Health - 17.05.2019
’Stepped’ treatment reduces drinking in patients with HIV
People with HIV who drink too much were more likely to reduce drinking after undergoing an approach to care known as integrated stepped alcohol treatment, according to a Yale-led study. The finding supports greater use of this treatment model in HIV clinics to improve outcomes for patients with both HIV and drinking problems, the researchers said.

Health - 17.05.2019
New Findings on Malaria Vaccine
New Findings on Malaria Vaccine
Protection by the malaria vaccine RTS,S is not only a matter of antibody quantity but also of quality. These are the findings of a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal) in collaboration with Swiss TPH and other partners. The research show for the first time that the higher the avidity of antibodies induced by the RTS,S vaccine, the greater the protection.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.05.2019
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms
Cancer drug could be repurposed to provide treatment for brain aneurysms, new research suggests An important class of drug used to treat cancer patients could be used to treat brain aneurysms, according to new research published this week. Brain aneurysms are a bulge in a blood vessel caused by a weakness in the blood vessel wall.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.05.2019
’Smart’ insulin could prevent hypoglycemia during diabetes treatment
UCLA bioengineers and their colleagues have developed a new type of insulin that could help prevent hypoglycemia in people who use the drug to manage diabetes. The treatment is being evaluated for potential clinical trials and, if successful, could change diabetes care. The study was published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation's Lifesavers'
Cooling baby treatment one of ‘Nation’s Lifesavers’
A University of Bristol researcher who discovered that cooling babies who have suffered a lack of oxygen at birth improves their survival without brain damage in later childhood, is named by Universities UK as one of the 'Nation's Lifesavers'. One in 1,000 babies born at full term in the UK suffer brain injury as a result of being severely deprived of oxygen.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.05.2019
UC San Diego Ranked Ninth in World in Biomedical Sciences
Nature Index also cited UC San Diego sixth among US academic institutions and UC San Diego Health Sciences seventh among health care institutions in 2019 In its first-ever assessment of biomedical institutions around the world, based upon published research in a targeted set of high-quality scientific journals, the 2019 Nature Index ranked University of California San Diego ninth among the top 200 institutions in biomedical sciences worldwide.

Health - Transport - 16.05.2019
Particles from aircraft engines affect airways
Particles from aircraft engines affect airways
In a unique experimental setup, Swiss researchers have investigated the effect of exhaust particles from aircraft turbine engines on human lung cells. The cells reacted most strongly to particles emitted during ground idling. The study also showed that the cytotoxic effect is only to some extent comparable to that of particles from gasoline and diesel engines.

Health - 16.05.2019
Provost named among Nation's Lifesavers
Provost named among Nation’s Lifesavers
A researcher from the University of Sussex has today been recognised for his exceptional contribution to the nation's wellbeing. Professor Saul Becker , the University's Provost and world-leading expert in young carers has been named one of the Nation's Lifesavers - the top 100 individuals or groups based in universities whose work is saving lives and making a life-changing difference to our health and wellbeing.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.05.2019
Study identifies how cancer drug inhibits DNA repair in cancer cells
According to researchers at Yale Cancer Center , a cancer drug thought to be of limited use possesses a superpower of sorts: It is able to stop certain cancer cells from repairing their DNA in order to survive. The study, published today Translational Medicine , suggests that combining this drug, cediranib, with other agents could potentially deliver a lethal blow in cancer that uses a specific pathway - or process - to create DNA repair cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.05.2019
Jawless fish take a bite out of the blood-brain barrier
A jawless parasitic fish could help lead the way to more effective treatments for multiple brain ailments, including cancer, trauma and stroke. One major challenge in treating cancers and other disorders of the brain is ensuring that medicines reach their targets. A team of biomedical engineers and clinician-scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Texas at Austin borrowed molecules from the immune system of the parasitic sea lamprey to deliver anti-cancer drugs directly to brain tumors.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 15.05.2019
First smartphone app that can hear ear infections in children
First smartphone app that can hear ear infections in children
. This condition occurs when fluid builds up in the middle ear behind the eardrum and is infected. This buildup is also common in another condition called otitis media with effusion. Any kind of fluid buildup can be painful and make it hard for children to hear, which can be especially detrimental when they are learning to talk. Both conditions are hard to diagnose because they have vague symptoms: Sometimes children tug on their ears or have fev

Health - Environment - 15.05.2019
How your clothes influence the air you breathe
How your clothes influence the air you breathe
Researchers have taken a critical look at how much we really know about our exposure to particles and chemicals transported by our clothing. His study concludes that further research is needed and opens up new areas of investigation. There is growing evidence that our clothing exposes us to particles and chemicals on a daily basis - and that this exposure could carry significant health risks.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.05.2019
Lowering blood pressure reduces brain bleeding in strokes
The search for treatments for spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage, the most devastating type of stroke, which carries a 40% mortality rate, has been rife with disappointments. But a new study suggests that intensive blood pressure lowering may reduce the amount of bleeding in deep areas of the brain in patients with the condition, a team of Yale researchers report May 13 in the journal JAMA Neurology.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
A new way to wind the development clock of cardiac muscle cells
These days, scientists can collect a few skin or blood cells, wipe out their identities, and reprogram them to become virtually any other kind of cell in the human body, from neurons to heart cells.    The journey from skin cell to  another type of  functional cell involves converting them into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), which  are  similar to the developmentally immature  stem  cells found in embryos, and then coaxing them to mature into  something different.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.05.2019
Decoy antibiotics could get around bacteria's defences
Decoy antibiotics could get around bacteria’s defences
Imperial medical students have helped to devise a new type of 'decoy' drug to tackle infections that are resistant to antibiotics. In tests with cell cultures, the new drug successfully killed a strain of drug-resistant bacteria. It works by delivering two antibiotics, one of which is effectively hidden.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.05.2019
Relay station in the brain controls our movements
Relay station in the brain controls our movements
The relay station of the brain, the substantia nigra consists of different types of nerve cells and is responsible for controlling the execution of diverse movements. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now characterized two of these cell populations more precisely and has been able to assign an exact function to each of them.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.05.2019
Symbionts as lifesavers
Symbionts as lifesavers
Researchers discover new factor influencing the spread of Legionella When people fall ill from bacterial infection, the first priority is to treat the disease. But where do these pathogens come from and how do they thrive in the environment before the infection occurs' An international team led by Matthias Horn from the Centre for Microbiology and Environmental Systems Science at the University of Vienna has tackled this question using an important bacterial pathogen that causes lung disease.

Health - 14.05.2019
New approach could improve heart attack care across Scotland
MSPs will tonight (Tuesday 14 May 2019) hear from University of Glasgow researchers how patients with life-threatening heart problems could benefit from a new approach to tracking treatments and outcomes throughout their care. An e-Registry of electronic health records has already helped Cardiologists bring together six care pathways for heart attack patients in the NHS.
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