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Health - Environment - 20.09.2019
Sustainable growth and energy insights: News from the College
Sustainable growth and energy insights: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From new models of Brazilian investment without ecological destruction, to fresh insights into photosynthesis, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Brazil's (and the world's) climate conundrum As one of the world's ten largest economies, Brazil has the potential for a unique model of economic progress.

Health - 20.09.2019
Malawi study confirms lasting impact of life-saving technology
Malawi study confirms lasting impact of life-saving technology
National CPAP program improves survival of newborns with respiratory illness Malawi's national adoption of affordable, rugged, neonatal CPAP technology as a part of routine hospital care resulted in sustained improvements in the survival of babies with respiratory illness, according to a new study in the journal Pediatrics.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.09.2019
Breath-holding technique could improve outcomes for radiotherapy patients
A technique that will enable cancer patients to hold their breath during prolonged bouts of radiotherapy treatment has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. In the study, published in Radiotherapy and Oncology , researchers demonstrated that, by safely increasing oxygen levels in the lungs and removing carbon dioxide from blood, it is possible for individuals to hold their breath for multiple four-minute periods during treatment.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.09.2019
Drug target for Alzheimer's disease has dual action
Drug target for Alzheimer’s disease has dual action
UQ researchers have discovered a potential drug target for Alzheimer's disease — an enzyme which has effects on both the immune and nervous systems. Dr Ramón Martínez-Mármol and Professor Frédéric A. Meunier from the Queensland Brain Institute Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research found that targeting one enzyme could combat the disease on two fronts.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.09.2019
One step closer to treating and preventing stomach flu thanks to new research model
One step closer to treating and preventing stomach flu thanks to new research model
Researchers at KU Leuven have developed a new research model to grow and study the human variant of the norovirus. The virus could thus far only be studied through a variant that occurs in mice. The new model, that is described in the journal PLOS Pathogens, should allow researchers to develop a treatment for stomach flu.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.09.2019
Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising
Antimicrobial resistance is drastically rising
An international team of researchers led by ETH has shown that antimicrobial-resistant infections are rapidly increasing in animals in low and middle income countries. They produced the first global of resistance rates, and identified regions where interventions are urgently needed. The world is experiencing unprecedented economic growth in lowand middle-income countries.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.09.2019
Advanced AI boosts clinical analysis of eye images
Advanced AI boosts clinical analysis of eye images
A fast and reliable machine learning tool, developed by the ARTORG Center, University of Bern and the Department of Ophthalmology, Inselspital brings Artificial Intelligence (AI) closer to clinical use in Ophthalmology. The novel method published in Nature Scientific Reports on September 19, 2019 presents a tool that reliably extracts meaning from extensive image data.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.09.2019
Brain tumors form synapses with healthy neurons
Tumors called high-grade gliomas wire themselves into the healthy brain, receiving and interpreting electrical signals from normal neurons, a Stanford study has found. Scientists at the Stanford University School of Medicine have shown for the first time that severe brain cancers integrate into the brain's wiring.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.09.2019
Babies born by C-section have different gut bacteria
Babies born by caesarean section have a reduced level of "good" gut bacteria and an increased number of pathogens linked to hospital environments, according to research co-led by UCL that is the most comprehensive study of the baby microbiome to date. In the study researchers analysed gut bacteria in stool samples taken from 596 babies born in British hospitals - 314 babies who had a natural, or vaginal, birth, and 282 who were born by caesarean.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.09.2019
"Genetic variants associated with educational attainment" can also have positive implications for lifestyle
A German and British research team lead by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has examined the interplay between genetics, cardiovascular disease and educational attainment in a major population study. Genetic variants which had been linked to educational attainment in other studies were observed in the subjects.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.09.2019
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research and University of Bern have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain. In 2018, breast cancer was the most common cancer in women worldwide, accounting for about a quarter of all reported cancers.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
The path of breast-to-brain cancer metastasis
Scientists at EPFL's Swiss Institute for Experimental Cancer Research have discovered a signaling pathway that breast tumors exploit to metastasize to the brain. Image: Breast cancer cells (blue) associate with glutamate-secreting neurons (red) to stimulate NMDA receptor-mediated signaling (green) of tumor growth (STED super-resolution microscopy).  In 2018, breast cancer was the most common cancer in women worldwide, accounting for about a quarter of all reported cancers.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Babies’ gut bacteria affected by delivery method
Babies born vaginally have different gut bacteria - their microbiome - than those delivered by Caesarean, research has shown. Scientists from the University of Birmingham, Wellcome Sanger Institute, UCL, and their collaborators discovered that whereas vaginally born babies got most of their gut bacteria from their mother, babies born via caesarean did not, and instead had more bacteria associated with hospital environments in their guts.

Pharmacology - Health - 18.09.2019
Positive results from Novartis five-year VERIFY study in type 2 diabetes demonstrate long-term clinical benefits of early combination treatment with Galvus and metformin
Early combination treatment strategy with vildagliptin (Galvus ) and metformin was superior to standard of care in newly diagnosed type 2 diabetes patients ,   The landmark VERIFY study is the first to investigate the long-term clinical benefits of this early combination strategy in type 2 diabetes (T2DM)   Novartis is committed to optimizing patient management of T2DM to achieve better glycemic control and favorable long-term clinical outcomes 

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.09.2019
3D virtual reality models help yield better surgical outcomes
A UCLA-led study has found that using three-dimensional virtual reality models to prepare for kidney tumor surgeries resulted in substantial improvements, including shorter operating times, less blood loss during surgery and a shorter stay in the hospital afterward. Previous studies involving 3D models have largely asked qualitative questions, such as whether the models gave the surgeons more confidence heading into the operations.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.09.2019
AI-based prognosis in intensive care: decision-relevant patterns identified in EEG of coma patients
AI-based prognosis in intensive care: decision-relevant patterns identified in EEG of coma patients
A reliable prognosis for coma patients in the intensive care unit is crucial. Improved transparency will boost the use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) to support end-of-life decisions. For the first time, a research team has succeeded in identifying specific patterns in Electro-Encephalogram (EEG) analyses that the deep-learning network uses for making prognosis decisions.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Points to new drug target in fight against cancer
Points to new drug target in fight against cancer
Research shows how a cancer-linked protein blocks key mitochondrial gateway Researchers have identified a potential new drug target in the fight against cancer. In a study this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , an international team of researchers describe how a cancer-linked version of the protein mitoNEET can close the primary gateways in the outer surface of mitochondria , the "power plants” that supply cells with chemical energy.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.09.2019
Interactions between bacteria and parasites
Interactions between bacteria and parasites
A team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has completed the first study of the effects of a simultaneous infection with blood flukes (schistosomes) and the bacterium Helicobacter pylori - a fairly common occurrence in some parts of the world. They identified a complex interaction which resulted - among other effects - in a weakening of the adverse impact of the pathogens acting individually.

Health - Pharmacology - 17.09.2019
How animal research is helping fight antibiotic resistance
How animal research is helping fight antibiotic resistance
We explore how animal research is playing a vital role in the battle against antibiotic resistant superbugs. People do not expect to die from a simple infection. But that might change: the world is running out of effective antibiotics. For decades, diseases like bacterial gastroenteritis and colitis have not been a serious health threat, thanks to antibiotics.

Pedagogy - Health - 17.09.2019
Play equipment that gets kids moving
Parents will be pleased to know that more is not always better when it comes to play equipment for their children. A study by researchers at The University of Queensland found children who have access to fixed play equipment like swings and slides and fewer electronic devices were more likely to meet national physical activity guidelines.
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