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Materials Science - Health - 16.01.2019
Mechanism helps explain the ear's exquisite sensitivity
Mechanism helps explain the ear’s exquisite sensitivity
A critical gel-like structure in the inner ear moves according to a sound's frequency, researchers find. The human ear, like those of other mammals, is so extraordinarily sensitive that it can detect sound-wave-induced vibrations of the eardrum that move by less than the width of an atom. Now, researchers at MIT have discovered important new details of how the ear achieves this amazing ability to pick up faint sounds.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.01.2019
Researcher uses big data to help optimize cancer treatment
In this Q&A, Paul Boutros explains how scientists take data, such as DNA sequencing, to design personal treatments Denise Heady Treating cancer is incredibly complex and there is no one-size-fits-all solution. But, there is something that can help physicians create treatments customized for individuals: big data.

Health - 15.01.2019
Medical detection dogs help diabetes patients regulate insulin levels
Medical detection dogs help diabetes patients regulate insulin levels
New research by the University of Bristol in collaboration with Medical Detection Dogs has found that the best trained alert dogs have the potential to vastly improve the quality of life of people living with Type 1 diabetes. As reported in PLOS One , on average trained dogs alerted their owners to 83 per cent of hypoglycaemic episodes in over 4,000 hypoand hyper-glycaemic episodes that were examined.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.01.2019
Elephantiasis and river blindness could be eliminated faster with new molecule
A new potential drug molecule could reduce treatment times for two widespread diseases from weeks to days, ultimately helping to eliminate them. The new molecule has been designed to more effectively target and kill the cause of elephantiasis and river blindness while having potentially fewer side effects.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.01.2019
Engineered'T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance
Engineered’T cells promote long-term organ transplant acceptance
Organ transplant rejection is a major problem in transplantation medicine. Suppressing the immune system to prevent organ rejection, however, opens the door to life-threatening infections. Researchers at the University of Basel's Biozentrum have now discovered a molecular approach preventing rejection of the transplanted graft while simultaneously maintaining the ability to fight against infections.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.01.2019
Human hazards hamper vampire bat venom research
Vampire bats could hold the key to new treatments for a range of serious medical problems, but researchers have hit a snag accessing the specimens needed to advance their work. An international team led by The University of Queensland has found a new class of blood pressure-regulating peptides in the venom of the common vampire bat ( Diphylla ecaudata ).

Health - 14.01.2019
Ers develop comprehensive new way to predict breast cancer risk
Ers develop comprehensive new way to predict breast cancer risk
Scientists have created the most comprehensive method yet to predict a woman's risk of breast cancer, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Cambridge. The study, funded by Cancer Research, is published today in Genetics in Medicine.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.01.2019
Large Study Identifies Genetic Variants Linked to Risk Tolerance and Risky Behaviors
An international group that includes researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine has identified 124 genetic variants associated with a person's willingness to take risks, as reported in a study published January 14 . The researchers emphasize that no variant on its own meaningfully affects a particular person's risk tolerance or penchant for making risky decisions — such as drinking, smoking, speeding — and non-genetic factors matter more for risk tolerance than genetic factors.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.01.2019
Conversion of breast cancer cells into fat cells impedes the formation of metastases
Conversion of breast cancer cells into fat cells impedes the formation of metastases
An innovative combination therapy can force malignant breast cancer cells to turn into fat cells. This can be used to prevent the formation of metastases in mice, as researchers at the University of Basel's Department of Biomedicine recently reported in the journal Cancer Cell. Tumor cells can adapt dynamically to changing conditions thanks to their ability to reactivate a cellular process that is central to embryonic development.

Health - 14.01.2019
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Recalling happy memories during adolescence can reduce risk of depression
Recalling positive events and experiences can help protect young people against depression in later life, suggests new research published today. Our work suggests that 'remembering the good times' may help build resilience to stress and reduce vulnerability to depression in young people Adrian Dahl Askelund Depression is now the leading cause of disability worldwide, affecting more than 300 million people.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
University launches first-of-its-kind equipment to transform imaging of cells, tissues and materials
The University of Nottingham is the first university in the world to own and operate unique equipment which allows label-free chemical imaging of materials, cells and tissues, with the potential to transform research in these areas. The new 3DOrbiSIMS is the first production instrument of its kind and will have applications in a multi-disciplinary range of research areas, including biomedical implants, drug delivery systems, developing strategies to tackle antimicrobial resistance, organic electronic devices and engineering applications.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.01.2019
How gut bacteria from infants could prevent food allergy
New research shows that healthy infants have intestinal bacteria that prevent the development of food allergies, findings that could impact the treatment of a disease that now affects 15 million Americans. Researchers from the University of Chicago, Argonne National Laboratory and the University of Naples Federico II in Italy discovered that when gut microbes from healthy human infants were transplanted into germ-free mice, the animals were protected from an allergic reaction when exposed to cow's milk.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.01.2019
New report reveals stark north south divide in painkiller prescribing
A new report has revealed that patients in the north of the country are being prescribed almost four times more opioids to relieve pain than those in the south. The research by the University of Nottingham's School of Pharmacy and the University of Manchester is the first national study to examine the regional variations in opioid prescribing and how this links with socioeconomic status.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.01.2019
Herbal antioxidants are becoming increasingly important
Herbal antioxidants are becoming increasingly important
Secondary plant compounds as an alternative to antioxidant vitamins and minerals The human organism is constantly exposed to so-called free radicals, which are a burden on the body. If they get out of hand, the result is oxidative stress, which can promote disease. While this has been treated in the past with the help of antioxidant vitamins and minerals, scientists are now increasingly turning to the use of phytochemicals, representing plant secondary metabolites.

Health - 14.01.2019
Reducing out of pocket health costs associated with better population health: study
Reducing out of pocket health costs associated with better population health: study
Reducing user charges is associated with improved health outcomes in low and middle-income countries, new research has found. The first systematic review of the relationship between user charges and health outcomes in lower middle-income countries, published in BMJ Global Health, found that reducing user charges for vulnerable populations can reduce financial hardship from healthcare payments, which in turn improves health outcomes and promotes health equity.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Predicting and preventing preterm births
Each year, 15 million babies worldwide are born prematurely, arriving at least three weeks before their due dates. Globally, prematurity is the largest cause of death before age 5, and even with excellent medical care, children who survive can have lasting physical, developmental and cognitive challenges.

Pharmacology - Health - 11.01.2019
Discreet contraception for world’s poorest countries
Innovative microneedle technology is being developed as an effective, pain-free and discreet method of delivering contraception across the world's poorest countries, thanks to a new research consortium led by Cardiff University and supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project will focus on pre-clinical work to develop microneedle patches that have the potential to be painlessly and inconspicuously administered by the user themselves within a few seconds and can last for up to six months.

Life Sciences - Health - 11.01.2019
Gene-editing tool now being used to develop better antibiotics
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE CONTACT: Jason Peters, (608) 265-6744, jason.peters [at] wisc (p) edu × A University of Wisconsin-Madison researcher and his collaborators at the University of California, San Francisco have repurposed the gene-editing tool CRISPR to study which genes are targeted by particular antibiotics, providing clues on how to improve existing antibiotics or develop new ones.

Psychology - Health - 11.01.2019
Autistic people urgently need access to tailored mental health support
New research has revealed that people diagnosed with autism don't have access to effective mental health support, putting them at risk of self-harm and suicide. Researchers from the University of Nottingham, Coventry University and the University of Cambridge worked with a steering group of Autistic adults to design and carry out the research which has recenlty been published in the journal Autism.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2019
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
Motor neurone disease breakthrough: Patient trial shows impressive clinical results
A new drug delays motor neurone disease progression and improves cognitive and clinical symptoms according to trial results announced by a spin-out company from the Florey and University of Melbourne. A new drug developed by scientists at the Florey Institute of Neuroscience , and the School of Chemistry and Bio21 Institute at the University of Melbourne has dramatically improved clinical and cognitive symptoms of motor neurone disease, also called amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.
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