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Physics - 17.05.2019
Scientists 'paint' Mona Lisa on a quantum canvas
Scientists ’paint’ Mona Lisa on a quantum canvas
The Mona Lisa, Van Gogh's Starry Night and dozens of other images have been recreated on a quantum ‘canvas' the width of a human hair, thanks to University of Queensland physicists. The images were projected and photographed on a blob of gaseous quantum matter known as Bose-Einstein condensate.

Physics - Transport - 16.05.2019
Particulate matter from aircraft engines affects airways
In a unique, innovative experiment, researchers under the leadership of the University of Bern have investigated the effect of exhaust particles from aircraft turbine engines on human lung cells. The cells reacted most strongly to particles emitted during ground idling. It was also shown that the cytotoxic effect is only to some extent comparable to that of particles from gasoline and diesel engines.

Physics - 15.05.2019
Tug-of-war drives magnetic north sprint
Tug-of-war drives magnetic north sprint
15 May 2019 As far as we know, Earth's magnetic north has always wandered, but it has recently gained new momentum and is making a dash towards Siberia at a pace not seen before. While this has some practical implications, scientists believe that this sprint is being caused by tussling magnetic blobs deep below our feet.

Physics - Earth Sciences - 13.05.2019
Concludes Glassy Menagerie of Particles in Beach Sands Near Hiroshima is Fallout Debris from A-Bomb Blast
Concludes Glassy Menagerie of Particles in Beach Sands Near Hiroshima is Fallout Debris from A-Bomb Blast
Mario Wannier, a career geologist with expertise in studying tiny marine life, was methodically sorting through particles in samples of beach sand from Japan's Motoujina Peninsula when he spotted something unexpected: a number of tiny, glassy spheres and other unusual objects. Wannier, who is now retired, had been comparing biological debris in beach sands from different areas in an effort to gauge the health of local and regional marine ecosystems.

Chemistry - Physics - 10.05.2019
Chemists take a closer look at the spot where water meets air
Chemists take a closer look at the spot where water meets air
Water, despite its central place in so many processes vital to life on Earth, remains a chemical mystery in many respects. One of those mysteries is the nature of water at the exact point where it comes into contact with air. A study published April 18 by researchers at Yale University and the University of Washington offers a new level of observation and analysis.

Physics - 09.05.2019
Computing faster with quasi-particles
Computing faster with quasi-particles
In collaboration with researchers from Harvard University, researchers from the University of Würzburg have made an important step on the road to topological quantum computers. Now, they present their findings in the renowned scientific journal Nature. Majorana particles are very peculiar members of the family of elementary particles.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.05.2019
A New Filter to Better Map the Dark Universe
A New Filter to Better Map the Dark Universe
The earliest known light in our universe, known as the cosmic microwave background, was emitted about 380,000 years after the Big Bang. The patterning of this relic light holds many important clues to the development and distribution of large-scale structures such as galaxies and galaxy clusters.

Life Sciences - Physics - 07.05.2019
Trigger for directed cell motion
When an individual cell is placed on a level surface, it does not keep still, but starts moving. This phenomenon was observed by the British cell biologist Michael Abercrombie as long ago as 1967. Since then, researchers have been thriving to understand how cells accomplish this feat. This much is known: cells form so-called lamellipodia - cellular protrusions that continuously grow and contract - to propel themselves towards signalling cues such as chemical attractants produced and secreted by other cells.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 07.05.2019
Twisting whirlpools of electrons
Twisting whirlpools of electrons
Using a novel approach, EPFL physicists have been able to create ultrafast electron vortex beams, with significant implications for fundamental physics, quantum computing, future data-storage and even certain medical treatments. In Jules Verne's famous classic Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea , the iconic submarine Nautilus disappears into the Moskenstraumen, a massive whirlpool off the coast of Norway.

Physics - 06.05.2019
Quantum computing with Graphene Plasmons
Quantum computing with Graphene Plasmons
A novel material that consists of a single sheet of carbon atoms could lead to new designs for optical quantum computers. Physicists from the University of Vienna and the Institute of Photonic Sciences in Barcelona have shown that tailored graphene structures enable single photons to interact with each other.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.05.2019
New gravitational waves found, we just don't know where they come from (yet)
New gravitational waves found, we just don’t know where they come from (yet)
The international team hunting for gravitational waves last week made the announcement of its first discoveries from the 2019 run. Professor Tara Murphy and colleagues unpack what this means. The hunt for  gravitational waves  is back on with the  announcement last week  of the detection of signals from what's thought to be the merger of two  neutron stars , the incredibly dense remains of a collapsed star.

Physics - 03.05.2019
First demonstration of antimatter wave interferometry
An international collaboration with participation of the University of Bern has demonstrated for the first time in an interference experiment that antimatter particles also behave as waves besides having particle properties. This success paves the way to a new field of investigations of antimatter. Matter waves constitute a crucial feature of quantum mechanics, where particles have wave properties in addition to particle characteristics.

Physics - Materials Science - 03.05.2019
New holographic technique opens the way for quantum computation
EPFL physicists have developed a method based on the principles of holograms to capture 3D images of objects beyond the reach of light. Photography measures how much light of different color hits the photographic film. However, light is also a wave, and is therefore characterized by the phase. Phase specifies the position of a point within the wave cycle and correlates to depth of information, meaning that recording the phase of light scattered by an object can retrieve its full 3D shape, which cannot be obtained with a simple photograph.

Physics - Chemistry - 03.05.2019
Researchers take a bottom-up approach to synthesizing microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing
Researchers take a bottom-up approach to synthesizing microscopic diamonds for bioimaging, quantum computing
Scientists are excited about diamonds - not the types that adorn jewelry, but the microscopic variety that are less than the width of a human hair. These so-called "nanodiamonds” are made up almost entirely of carbon. But by introducing other elements into the nanodiamond's crystal lattice - a method known as "doping” - researchers could produce traits useful in medical research, computation and beyond.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.05.2019
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Have scientists observed a black hole swallowing a neutron star?
Within weeks of switching their machines back on to scour the sky for more sources of gravitational waves, scientists are poring over data in an attempt to further understand an unprecedented cosmic event. Astronomers working at the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO) and the European-based Virgo detector have reported the possible detection of gravitational waves emanating from the collision of a neutron star and a black hole.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 03.05.2019
Stop ageing in space
Stop ageing in space
3 May 2019 Wrinkles, muscle pain, high blood pressure and a clumsy brain are all natural consequences of getting old. As our cells rust over time, a key to fighting chronic disease may be in tiny, smartly designed particles that have the potential to become an anti-ageing supplement. A European experiment seeking innovative antioxidants is on its way to space.

Physics - 02.05.2019
Machine Learning paves the way for next-level quantum sensing
Machine Learning paves the way for next-level quantum sensing
University of Bristol researchers have reached new heights of sophistication in detecting magnetic fields with extreme sensitivity at room temperature by combining machine learning with a quantum sensor. The findings, published in Physical Review X, could lead to a new generation of MRI scanners which use magnetic fields and radio waves to produce detailed images of the inside of the body, as well as further potential uses within biology and material science.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.05.2019
UofG astrophysicists investigate two new neutron star collisions
Astrophysicists at the University of Glasgow are celebrating the detection of gravitational wave signals likely to be caused by the crashing of two neutron stars and what could be the first evidence of the collision of a neutron star and a black hole. The University of Glasgow researchers are key partners in the international scientific collaboration which made the new detections - the National Science Foundation's Laser Interferometer Gravitational-Wave Observatory (LIGO), based in the United States, and Virgo, based in Italy.

Physics - 02.05.2019
Watching concrete explode
Watching concrete explode
Even if concrete is not flammable, it can be hazardous in tunnel fires: high-performance concrete can explode at high temperatures. Although the phenomenon is well known, the physics behind it have not yet been fully understood. Empa researchers have now made the processes inside concrete visible for the first time using real-time-neutron radiography and tomography.

Physics - 01.05.2019
Swarm helps explain Earth's magnetic jerks
Swarm helps explain Earth’s magnetic jerks
1 May 2019 Our protective magnetic field is always restless, but every now and then something weird happens - it jerks. Although scientists have known about these rapid shifts for some 40 years, the reason why they occur has remained a frustrating mystery, until now. Since geomagnetic jerks were discovered in 1978 scientists have been trying to work out why the magnetic field suddenly and unexpectedly accelerates.
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