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Computer Science / Telecom - Physics - 22.03.2019
Machine learning could help scientists invent flexible electronics
Organic electronics could allow companies to print electronics like paper or incorporate them into clothing to power wearable electronics-if there were only better ways to control their electronic structure. To help address this challenge, Nick Jackson, a postdoctoral fellow in the University of Chicago's Institute for Molecular Engineering , developed a faster way of creating molecular models by using machine learning.

Physics - 21.03.2019
LHCb sees a new flavour of matter-antimatter asymmetry
LHCb sees a new flavour of matter-antimatter asymmetry
The LHCb collaboration at CERN 1 has seen, for the first time, the matter-antimatter asymmetry known as CP violation in a particle dubbed the D0 meson. The finding, presented today at the annual Rencontres de Moriond conference and in a dedicated CERN seminar , is sure to make it into the textbooks of particle physics.

Life Sciences - Physics - 21.03.2019
Engineering Technique Provides Insight into Cellular Forces
Kris Dahl, a chemical engineering and biomedical engineering professor at Carnegie Mellon University, is using a new method to understand how cells are structured. Her method uses densely packed regions of condensed DNA, known as chromatin, to be used a sensors for cellular force generation. The technique, known as SINK, which stands for sensors from intranuclear kinetics, allowed Dahl and her team to provide physical and biological insights into cells.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 20.03.2019
Giant 'chimneys' vent X-rays from Milky Way's core
Giant ’chimneys’ vent X-rays from Milky Way’s core
By surveying the centre of our Galaxy, ESA's XMM-Newton has discovered two colossal 'chimneys' funneling material from the vicinity of the Milky Way's supermassive black hole into two huge cosmic bubbles. The giant bubbles were discovered in 2010 by NASA's Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope: one stretches above the plane of the Milky Way galaxy and the other below, forming a shape akin to a colossal hourglass that spans about 50 000 light years - around half the diameter of the entire Galaxy.

Physics - Materials Science - 20.03.2019
The Best Topological Conductor Yet: Spiraling Crystal Is the Key to Exotic Discovery
The Best Topological Conductor Yet: Spiraling Crystal Is the Key to Exotic Discovery
The realization of so-called topological materials - which exhibit exotic, defect-resistant properties and are expected to have applications in electronics, optics, quantum computing, and other fields - has opened up a new realm in materials discovery. Several of the hotly studied topological materials to date are known as topological insulators.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.03.2019
How our body «listens» to vibrations
How our body «listens» to vibrations
UNIGE researchers show that, for the brain, sounds and vibrations are ultimately quite similar. This would explain why vibrations are sometimes as unpleasant as noise pollution. We all know the feeling of a mobile phone vibrating in our hands when announcing an incoming call. If we perceive these vibrations so clearly, it is due to specialized receptors that transduce them into neural signals sent to our brain.

Physics - Environment - 20.03.2019
Precision work for large molecules
Precision work for large molecules
Quantum cascade lasers are able to measure the smallest molecules with high precision. But the technology has failed to measure larger gas molecules - until now! Empa researchers have succeeded in quantifying ethanol, an important organic molecule, with the aid of such a laser. In collaboration with the Swiss Federal Institute of Metrology (METAS), a team of researchers has successfully developed a method for determining the concentration of ethanol in a gas mixture with a very high proportion of water vapour and carbon dioxide.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.03.2019
A Pioneer in Ultrasensitive Particle Detectors
A Pioneer in Ultrasensitive Particle Detectors
Berkeley Lab's Alan Smith drove the science of measuring radioactivity in experiments' materials and components Note: This article was adapted from an article originally published by the Sanford Underground Research Facility. View the original article. In 1953, Alan "Al" Smith arrived for his first day of work at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab).

Materials Science - Physics - 18.03.2019
Scientists create fire-retardant sensors for safety gear in harsh environments
Scientists create fire-retardant sensors for safety gear in harsh environments
Self-extinguishing device uses body movement to determine when workers are in danger Meghan Steele Horan Imagine a device that could stand up to even the most intense fires so that it could automatically signal others when a firefighter is immobilized on the job. UCLA researchers and colleagues at two other universities have designed the first fire-retardant, self-extinguishing motion sensor and power generator.

Chemistry - Physics - 18.03.2019
A new way to generate hydrogen fuel from seawater
A new way to generate hydrogen fuel from seawater
Splitting water into hydrogen and oxygen presents an alternative to fossil fuels, but purified water is a precious resource. A Stanford-led team has now developed a way to harness seawater - Earth's most abundant source - for chemical energy. Stanford researchers have devised a way to generate hydrogen fuel using solar power, electrodes and saltwater from San Francisco Bay.

Physics - 18.03.2019
Cutting-edge fingerprint technology could help in the fight against knife crime
A new fingerprint technique capable of producing high-resolution images from the most challenging of metal surfaces, including knives and firearms - is already attracting interest from detectives working on cold cases. Experts at the University of Nottingham in collaboration with the University of Derby , are using highly sensitive, non-destructive Time-of-Flight Secondary Ion Mass Spectroscopy (ToF-SIMS) to develop high resolution fingerprint images from surfaces conventional fingerprint imaging fails to pick up at all.

Physics - Materials Science - 15.03.2019
High-quality bespoke nanocrystals
Stanford researchers redefine what it means for low-cost semiconductors, called quantum dots, to be near-perfect and find that quantum dots meet quality standards set by more expensive alternatives. Tiny, easy-to-produce particles, called quantum dots, may soon take the place of more expensive single crystal semiconductors in advanced electronics found in solar panels, camera sensors and medical imaging tools.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 15.03.2019
New 3D map will help solve long-standing cosmic mysteries
New 3D map will help solve long-standing cosmic mysteries
A new study led by ANU has created a 3D map of the magnetic field in a small wedge of the Milky Way galaxy, paving the way for future discoveries that will improve our understanding of the origin and evolution of the Universe. Lead researcher Dr Aris Tritsis from the ANU Research School of Astronomy and Astrophysics (RSAA) said this was the first study to tomographically measure the strength of our galaxy's magnetic field.

Physics - 14.03.2019
Sea Quark Surprise Reveals Deeper Complexity in Proton Spin Puzzle
Sea Quark Surprise Reveals Deeper Complexity in Proton Spin Puzzle
Berkeley Lab researchers contribute to new results from STAR experiment that show antiquarks' contribution to proton spin depends on 'flavor' Note: This press release is adapted from a release produced by Brookhaven National Laboratory. View the original release. New data from the STAR experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) add detail - and complexity - to an intriguing puzzle that scientists have been seeking to solve: how the building blocks that make up a proton contribute to its spin.

Physics - Music - 14.03.2019
Exotic
Exotic "second sound" phenomenon observed in pencil lead
At relatively balmy temperatures, heat behaves like sound when moving through graphite, study reports. The next time you set a kettle to boil, consider this scenario: After turning the burner off, instead of staying hot and slowly warming the surrounding kitchen and stove, the kettle quickly cools to room temperature and its heat hurtles away in the form of a boiling-hot wave.

Physics - 14.03.2019
Research set to shake-up space missions
Research set to shake-up space missions
A new study from The Australian National University (ANU) has found a number of 2D materials can not only withstand being sent into space, but potentially thrive in the harsh conditions. It could influence the type of materials used to build everything from satellite electronics to solar cells and batteries - making future space missions more accessible, and cheaper to launch.

Chemistry - Physics - 13.03.2019
Converting biomass by applying mechanical force
Converting biomass by applying mechanical force
One of the greatest global challenges is the efficient use of renewable sources in order to meet the increasing demand for energy and feedstock chemicals in the future. In this context, biomass is a promising alternative to existing fossil sources such as coal or oil. Cellulose plays a decisive role here because it accounts for the largest fraction of the natural carbon storage.

Life Sciences - Physics - 12.03.2019
Axolotl salamanders provide clues to spinal cord regeneration
Researchers are one step closer to solving the mystery of why some vertebrates can regenerate their spinal cords while others, including humans, create scar tissue after spinal cord injury, leading to lifelong damage. Scientists at the Marine Biological Laboratory have identified gene "partners" in the axolotl salamander that, when activated, allow the neural tube and associated nerve fibers to functionally regenerate after severe spinal cord damage.

Physics - 12.03.2019
Sydney united to build a Quantum Harbour City
Sydney united to build a Quantum Harbour City
Sydney is fast becoming recognised as the global destination for quantum technology. Research teams at the University of Sydney and UNSW are finding that cooperation alongside competition provide a fertile ground for advancement. Research collaboration between UNSW and the University of Sydney has overcome a fundamental hurdle to building quantum computers in silicon, opening the way to further develop the machines at scale.

Materials Science - Physics - 08.03.2019
Researchers simulate the process of adhesive wear
Researchers simulate the process of adhesive wear
Using high-performance computer simulations, EPFL researchers were able to observe how surface roughness changes when two materials rub together. Their findings, which provide insight into friction and wear mechanisms, have implications for areas ranging from engineering to the study of tectonic faults.
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