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Physics - 23.07.2019
When the pigeon and the letter do not travel together
When the pigeon and the letter do not travel together
In standard communication the pigeon always carries the message; the information is linked to a physical entity/particle. Counter to intuition, in a new counterfactual communication protocol published in NPJ Quantum Information, scientists from the University of Vienna, the University of Cambridge and the MIT have experimentally demonstrated that in quantum mechanics this is not always true, thereby contradicting a crucial premise of communication theory.

Physics - Materials Science - 19.07.2019
Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms
Better thermal conductivity by adjusting the arrangement of atoms
Adjusting the thermal conductivity of materials is one of the challenges nanoscience is currently facing. Together with colleagues from the Netherlands and Spain, researchers from the University of Basel have shown that the atomic vibrations that determine heat generation in nanowires can be controlled through the arrangement of atoms alone.

Physics - Chemistry - 18.07.2019
New Laws of Attraction: Scientists Print Magnetic Liquid Droplets
Scientists at Berkeley Lab have made a new material that is both liquid and magnetic, opening the door to a new area of science in magnetic soft matter. Their findings could lead to a revolutionary class of printable liquid devices for a variety of applications from artificial cells that deliver targeted cancer therapies to flexible liquid robots that can change their shape to adapt to their surroundings.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.07.2019
50 years later, UChicago scientists continue to decode moon’s mysteries
Fifty years ago, NASA astronauts stepped off Apollo 11 and delivered what instantly became the most precious rock on Earth: nearly 50 pounds of dust and rock fragments from the surface of the moon. Suddenly, the wildest dreams of geoscientists had come true, as tiny pieces of the first rocks collected on another celestial body made their way to labs across the U.S. for analysis.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.07.2019
First-ever visualisations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices
First-ever visualisations of electrical gating effects on electronic structure could lead to longer-lasting devices
Scientists have visualized the electronic structure in a microelectronic device for the first time, opening up opportunities for finely tuned, high-performance electronic devices. Physicists from the University of Washington and the University of Warwick developed a technique to measure the energy and momentum of electrons in operating microelectronic devices made of atomically thin - so-called 2D - materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.07.2019
A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune
A Graphene Superconductor That Plays More Than One Tune
W hat's thinner than a human hair but has a depth of special traits' A multitasking graphene device developed by researchers at the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The superthin material easily switches from a superconductor that conducts electricity without losing any energy, to an insulator that resists the flow of electric current, and back again to a superconductor - all with a simple flip of a switch.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.07.2019
Hunting for
Hunting for "ghost particles": Neutrino observatory at the South Pole will be extended
For almost ten years, scientists from all over the world have been using the large-scale experiment "IceCube" to search for neutrinos in the permanent ice of the South Pole. Neutrinos are the smallest particles that reach Earth as cosmic rays. Now the participating researchers, among them Prof. Alexander Kappes from the University of Münster, are pleased about a huge upgrade of the laboratory, which should contribute to measuring the properties of neutrinos much more accurately than before.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Weyl fermions discovered in another class of materials
A particular kind of elementary particle, the Weyl fermions, were first discovered a few years ago. Their specialty: They move through a material in a well ordered manner that practically never lets them collide with each other and is thus very energy efficient. This implies intriguing possibilities for the electronics of the future.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Image of quantum entanglement
For the first time ever, physicists have managed to take a photo of a strong form of quantum entanglement called Bell entanglement - capturing visual evidence of an elusive phenomenon which a baffled Albert Einstein once called 'spooky action at a distance'. Two particles which interact with each other - like two photons passing through a beam splitter, for example - can sometimes remain connected, instantaneously sharing their physical states no matter how great the distance which separates them.

Physics - 12.07.2019
Which is the perfect quantum theory?
Which is the perfect quantum theory?
Is that a dog or a cat? Such a classification is a prime example of machine learning: artificial neural networks can be trained to analyze images by looking for patterns that are characteristic of specific objects. Provided the system has learned such patterns, it is able to recognize dogs or cats on any picture.

Chemistry - Physics - 11.07.2019
What happens when you explode a chemical bond?
UC Berkeley scientists are probing the fleeting steps in rapid photochemical reactions with some of the shortest laser pulses possible today. In this case, a femtosecond pulse of visible light (green) triggers the breakup of iodine monobromide molecules (center), while attosecond XUV laser pulses (blue) take snapshots of the molecules.

Physics - 11.07.2019
Physicists discover family members of Schrödinger's cat
Physicists discover family members of Schrödinger’s cat
It has been said that the internet exists chiefly to show videos of cats interacting with boxes. An international team of researchers led by The University of Queensland has extended cats and boxes into the quantum realm, discovering that Schrödinger's famous dead-and-alive cat is just one of an infinite family of quantum states.

Physics - 10.07.2019
Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms
Quantum sensor breakthrough using naturally occurring vibrations in artificial atoms
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, have discovered a new method that could be used to build quantum sensors with ultra-high precision. When individual atoms emit light, they do so in discrete packets called photons. When this light is measured, this discrete or ‘granular' nature leads to especially low fluctuations in its brightness, as two or more photons are never emitted at the same time.

Physics - 10.07.2019
Physics Professor’s Research Sheds Light on the Mass of Sound
Most of us normally think that sound travels through the air without shape or substance. A recent study building on research conducted by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Physics Riccardo Penco has shown that sound waves actually have a small amount of mass that is in a possibly exotic form.

Life Sciences - Physics - 09.07.2019
Tungsten as interstellar radiation shielding?
Tungsten as interstellar radiation shielding?
Metallophilic microorganisms could benefit from the heavy metal in harsh survival conditions A boiling point of 5900 degrees Celsius and diamond-like hardness in combination with carbon: tungsten is the heaviest metal, yet has biological functions - especially in heat-loving microorganisms. A team led by Tetyana Milojevic from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna report for the first time rare microbial-tungsten interactions at the nanometer range.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.07.2019
On-demand control of terahertz and infrared waves
On-demand control of terahertz and infrared waves
Researchers from the University of Geneva and the University of Manchester have confirmed experimentally the theory of very strong magneto-optical resonance in graphene. The ability to control infrared and terahertz waves using magnetic or electric fields is one of the great challenges in physics that could revolutionise opto-electronics, telecommunications and medical diagnostics.

Physics - 09.07.2019
A connection between quantum correlations and spacetime geometry
A connection between quantum correlations and spacetime geometry
Researchers of the Academy explore the consequences of locality for measurements distributed in spacetime. Their article has now been published in the Nature journal "Quantum Information". Locality is a fundamental principle behind all physical interactions. It says that each physical system can only interact with other systems in its immediate vicinity, so that interactions between two distant objects must be mediated by an intermediary.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 08.07.2019
New Semiconductor Technology for Future Data Communications
New Semiconductor Technology for Future Data Communications
Researchers have developed world-leading Compound Semiconductor (CS) technology that can drive future high-speed data communications. A team from Cardiff University worked to innovate an ultrafast and highly sensitive ‘avalanche photodiode' (APD) that creates less electronic ‘noise' than its silicon rivals.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.07.2019
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Chameleon Theory could change our thoughts on gravity
Einstein's theory of General Relativity is world famous - but it might not be the only way to explain how gravity works and how galaxies form. Physicists at Durham University created huge supercomputer simulations of the universe to test an alternative theory. Our researchers found that f(R)-gravity - a so-called Chameleon Theory - could also explain the formation of structures in the cosmos.

Physics - Mathematics - 05.07.2019
Simulating quantum systems with neural networks
Simulating quantum systems with neural networks
A new computational method, based on neural networks, can simulate open quantum systems with unprecedented versatility. The method was independently developed by physicists at EPFL, France, the UK, and the US, and is published in Physical Review Letters. Even on the scale of everyday life, nature is governed by the laws of quantum physics.
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