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Astronomy / Space Science - 17.09.2020
Astronomers Solve Mystery of How Planetary Nebulae Are Shaped
Following extensive observations of stellar winds around cool evolved stars scientists have figured out how planetary nebulae get their mesmerizing shapes. The findings, published in Science , contradict common consensus, and show that not only are stellar winds aspherical, but they also share similarities with planetary nebulae.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 14.09.2020
Hints of life discovered on Venus
Hints of life discovered on Venus
A UK-led team of astronomers has discovered a rare molecule - phosphine - in the clouds of Venus, pointing to the possibility of extra-terrestrial 'aerial' life. The presence of life is the only known explanation for the amount of phosphine inferred by observations Paul Rimmer Astronomers have speculated for decades that high clouds on Venus could offer a home for microbes - floating free of the scorching surface, but tolerating very high acidity.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.09.2020
Hints of life on Venus
Hints of life on Venus
Synthesized false colour image of Venus, using 283-nm and 365-nm band images taken by the Venus Ultraviolet Imager (UVI). JAXA / ISAS / Akatsuki Project Team An international team of astronomers, led by Professor Jane Greaves of Cardiff University, today announced the discovery of a rare molecule - phosphine - in the clouds of Venus.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 10.09.2020
Holding up a mirror to a dark matter discrepancy
Holding up a mirror to a dark matter discrepancy
The universe's funhouse mirrors are revealing a difference between how dark matter behaves in theory and how it appears to act in reality. Dark matter is the invisible glue that keeps stars bound together inside a galaxy. It makes up most of a galaxy's mass and creates an invisible scaffold that tethers galaxies to form clusters.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 09.09.2020
AI shows how hydrogen becomes a metal inside giant planets
Researchers have used a combination of AI and quantum mechanics to reveal how hydrogen gradually turns into a metal in giant planets. The existence of metallic hydrogen was theorised a century ago, but what we haven't known is how this process occurs Bingqing Cheng Dense metallic hydrogen - a phase of hydrogen which behaves like an electrical conductor - makes up the interior of giant planets, but it is difficult to study and poorly understood.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.09.2020
Revealing the secrets of high-energy cosmic particles
Revealing the secrets of high-energy cosmic particles
P-ONE: Initiative for a new, large-scale Neutrino Observatory in the Pacific Ocean The "IceCube" neutrino observatory deep in the ice of the South Pole has already brought spectacular new insights into cosmic incidents of extremely high energies. In order to investigate the cosmic origins of elementary particles with even higher energies, Prof. Elisa Resconi from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now started an international initiative to build a neutrino telescope several cubic kilometers in size in the northeastern Pacific.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.09.2020
Massive halo finally explains stream of gas swirling around the Milky Way
A view of the gas in the Magellanic System as it would appear in the night sky. The Magellanic Corona covers the entire sky while the Magellanic Stream is seen as gas flowing away from the two dwarf galaxies, the Large and the Small Magellanic Clouds. This image, taken directly from the numerical simulations, has been modified slightly for aesthetics.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 09.09.2020
Lead Lab Selected for Next-Generation Cosmic Microwave Background Experiment
Lead Lab Selected for Next-Generation Cosmic Microwave Background Experiment
U.S. DOE selects Berkeley Lab to lead DOE/NSF experiment that combines observatories at the South Pole and in Chile's high desert The largest collaborative undertaking yet to explore the relic light emitted by the infant universe has taken a step forward with the U.S. Department of Energy's selection of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) to lead the partnership of national labs, universities, and other institutions that will carry out the DOE roles and responsibilities for the effort.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 08.09.2020
UChicago to partner with Berkeley Lab to build next-gen cosmic microwave background experiment
The largest collaborative undertaking yet to explore the relic light emitted by the infant universe has taken a step forward with the selection of Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory to lead the U.S. Department of Energy's portion of the project. This next-generation experiment, known as  CMB-S4, or Cosmic Microwave Background Stage 4 , will unite several existing collaborations to survey the microwave sky in unprecedented detail.

Astronomy / Space Science - 04.09.2020
Warped disk 'torn apart by stars'
Warped disk ’torn apart by stars’
Pioneering new research has revealed the first direct evidence that groups of stars can tear apart their planet-forming disk, leaving it warped and with tilted rings. An international team of experts, led by astronomers at the University of Exeter and including the University of Michigan, has identified a stellar system where planet formation might take place in inclined dust and gas rings within a warped circumstellar disk around multiple stars.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.09.2020
Surprise on Mars
Surprise on Mars
NASA's InSight mission provides data from the surface of Mars. Its seismometer, equipped with electronics built at ETH Zurich, not only records marsquakes, but unexpectedly reacts to solar eclipses as well. When the Martian moon, Phobos moves directly in front of the sun, the instrument tips slightly to one side.

Astronomy / Space Science - 03.09.2020
Ripples from deep in the cosmos reveals most massive black hole detected yet
Ripples from deep in the cosmos reveals most massive black hole detected yet
The most massive gravitational-wave source yet has been detected - a binary black hole merger which produced a blast equal to the energy of eight suns, sending shockwaves through the universe. Gravitational waves are produced when an extreme cosmic event occurs somewhere in the universe and, like dropping a rock in a pond, these events ripple across the cosmos, bending and stretching the fabric of space-time itself.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 03.09.2020
Where do black-hole parents meet? LIGO/Virgo may provide answers
Astrophysicists investigating gravitational-wave data from the far reaches of the Universe believe they may have found an explanation for a curious signal detected from the collision of two black holes. The signal, named GW190412, was picked up by the LIGO / Virgo detectors, which are set up to observe gravitational waves - the ripples in space and time caused by huge astronomical objects - and use them to make new discoveries about our Universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.09.2020
A gravitational
A gravitational "bang": LIGO and Virgo discover the most massive gravitational-wave source yet
The LIGO and Virgo Collaboration, which includes scientists from the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy at the University of Birmingham, have reported the discovery of a signal from what may be the most massive black hole merger yet observed in gravitational waves. The signal, labelled GW190521, was detected on May 21, 2019, with the LIGO and Virgo detectors.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.09.2020
Zooming in on dark matter
Zooming in on dark matter
Our cosmologists have zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe - which could help us find the real thing in space. Using a supercomputer simulation of the universe they achieved a zoom equivalent to being able to see a flea on the surface of the Moon. This meant they could make detailed pictures and analyses of hundreds of virtual dark matter haloes from the very largest (galaxy clusters) to the tiniest (about the same as Earth's mass).

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.09.2020
New populations of black holes revealed by gravitational waves
New populations of black holes revealed by gravitational waves
The gravitational wave 1 detectors LIGO and Virgo have just chalked up their biggest catch yet, a black hole 142 times the mass of the Sun, resulting from the merger of two black holes of 85 and 66 solar masses.  The remnant black hole is the most massive ever observed with gravitational waves, and it could give us some clues about the formation of the supermassive black holes that sit at the centres of some galaxies.

Astronomy / Space Science - Innovation - 02.09.2020
Most massive gravitational wave signal yet poses new mysteries
The most massive gravitational-wave source yet has been detected - a binary black hole merger, which produced a blast equal to the energy of eight Suns, sending shockwaves through the universe. The detection provides answers to some fundamental questions about how black holes are formed - and poses some intriguing new ones.

Astronomy / Space Science - 02.09.2020
Scientists
Scientists "Zoom In" On Dark Matter, Revealing The Invisible Skeleton Of The Universe
Using the power of supercomputers, an international team of researchers has zoomed in on the smallest clumps of dark matter in a virtual universe. Published today in Nature, the study reveals dark matter haloes as active regions of the sky, teeming with not only galaxies, but also radiation-emitting collisions that could make it possible to find these haloes in the real sky.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 02.09.2020
Gravity wave insights from internet-beaming balloons
Gravity wave insights from internet-beaming balloons
Gravity waves emerge when parcels of air are forced upward and then pulled down by gravity. (Image credit: iStock) A better understanding of how gravity waves in the upper atmosphere interact with the jet stream, polar vortex and other phenomena could be key to improved weather predictions and climate models.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 02.09.2020
A "Bang" in LIGO-Virgo Detectors Signals Most Massive Gravitational-Wave Source Yet
For all its vast emptiness, the universe hums with activity in the form of gravitational waves. Produced by extreme astrophysical phenomena, these reverberations ripple forth and shake the fabric of space-time, like the clang of a cosmic bell. Now researchers have detected a signal from what may be the most massive black hole merger yet to be observed in gravitational waves.
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