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Physics - Chemistry - 20.01.2020
Platelets instead of spheres make screens more economical
Platelets instead of spheres make screens more economical
ETH scientists have further developed QLED technology for screens. They have produced light sources that for the first time emit high-intensity light in only one direction. This reduces scattering losses, which makes the technology extremely energy efficient. QLED screens have been on the market for a few years now.

Health - Chemistry - 17.01.2020
Ingestible medical devices can be broken down with light
Ingestible medical devices can be broken down with light
New light-sensitive material could eliminate some of the endoscopic procedures needed to remove gastrointestinal devices. A variety of medical devices can be inserted into the gastrointestinal tract to treat, diagnose, or monitor GI disorders. Many of these have to be removed by endoscopic surgery once their job is done.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.01.2020
Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate
Chemists allow boron atoms to migrate
Organic molecules with atoms of the semi-metal boron are among the most important building blocks for synthesis products that are needed to produce drugs and agricultural chemicals. However, during the usual chemical reactions used in industry, the valuable boron unit, which can replace another atom in a molecule, is often lost.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 15.01.2020
New Mechanisms Describe How the Genome Regulates Itself
An organism's genome contains all of the information necessary for each of its cells and tissues to develop and function properly. Written in DNA, each individual gene encodes for something, whether it is a structural protein that helps define a tissue's shape, an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reactions of life, or a signaling protein that cells use to communicate.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 13.01.2020
Accelerated speed of discovery could lead to more effective smoking cessation aids
Accelerated speed of discovery could lead to more effective smoking cessation aids
As smokers know all too well, nicotine is highly addictive. It's hard to quit smoking, a habit that claims the lives of more than seven million people each year. Smoking tobacco delivers nicotine to the neuroreceptors responsible for addiction, affecting the nervous system and causing addiction. A new study, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, into the molecular interactions involved has revealed how these neuroreceptors respond to nicotine.

Physics - Chemistry - 10.01.2020
'Green methane' from artificial photosynthesis could recycle CO2
’Green methane’ from artificial photosynthesis could recycle CO2
A new artificial photosynthesis approach uses sunlight to turn carbon dioxide into methane, which could help make natural-gas-powered devices carbon neutral. Methane is the main component of natural gas. Photosynthesis is the process through which green plants use sunlight to make food for themselves out of carbon dioxide and water, releasing oxygen as a byproduct.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 10.01.2020
An 18-carat gold nugget made of plastic
An 18-carat gold nugget made of plastic
ETH researchers have created an incredibly lightweight 18-carat gold, using a matrix of plastic in place of metallic alloy elements. Lovers of gold watches and heavy jewellery will be thrilled. The objects of their desire may someday become much lighter, but without losing any of their glitter. Especially with watches, a small amount of weight can make all the difference.

Chemistry - Physics - 10.01.2020
Unused stockpiles of nuclear waste could be more useful than we might think, according to new study
Chemists have found a new use for the waste product of nuclear power - transforming an unused stockpile into a versatile compound which could be used to create valuable commodity chemicals as well as new energy sources. Depleted uranium (DU) is a radioactive by-product from the process used to create nuclear energy.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 09.01.2020
Scientists image heart RNA structure for the first time
Scientists image heart RNA structure for the first time
Work could lead to new strategies in regenerative medicine for heart conditions A better understanding of these RNAs could lead to new strategies in regenerative medicine for people with heart conditions due to cardiovascular disease or aging. Karissa Sanbonmatsu LOS ALAMOS, N.M., Jan. 9, 2020-Scientists at Los Alamos and international partners have created the first 3-D images of a special type of RNA molecule that is critical for stem cell programming and known as the "dark matter” of the genome.

Chemistry - 08.01.2020
Catalytic protocells get zingy
Catalytic protocells get zingy
From the synthesis of drugs to the generation of plastics, catalysts - substances that speed up chemical reactions without being consumed - are the backbone of many industrial processes. Catalysts come in many forms such as inorganic nanoparticles, organic liquids and aqueous enzymes, and can be linked to solid surfaces to increase their performance.

Chemistry - Physics - 08.01.2020
A new form of glass through molecular entanglement
A new form of glass through molecular entanglement
Physicists at the University of Vienna in collaboration with the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research have discovered a new type of glass formed by long, cyclic molecules. The scientists successfully demonstrated that by making parts of the rings more mobile, the rings become more strongly entangled and the molecular fluid glassifies.

Environment - Chemistry - 07.01.2020
Way to turn water pollution into valuable chemicals
Way to turn water pollution into valuable chemicals
Pollution from ammonia-based fertilizer reverts back to ammonia - with a side of rocket fuel Rice University researchers have identified a simpler way to rid water of cancer-causing pollutants and turn them into valuable chemicals. Michael Wong, Thomas Senftle and their team have discovered a new catalyst that can turn nitrite pollutant waste into ammonia, a compound mostly used as fertilizer and household cleaner, as well as hydrazine, which is used as rocket fuel.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 06.01.2020
New way to sustainably make chemicals by copying nature's tricks
New way to sustainably make chemicals by copying nature’s tricks
Researchers have copied the way organisms produce toxic chemicals without harming themselves, paving the way for greener chemical and fuel production. The new technique, pioneered by Imperial College London scientists, could reduce the need to use fossil fuels to create chemicals, plastics, fibres and fuels.

Chemistry - Physics - 06.01.2020
Hydrogen as a Climate-neutral Fuel
Prospective Students Students and Doctorate Alumni and Supporters Continuing Education A team of researchers from Freie Universität Berlin, the University of Bochum, and the University of Linz has succeeded in observing the transfer of protons in a hydrogenase reaction. No 391/2020 from Jan 06, 2020 Scientists from Freie Universität Berlin, the University of Bochum, and the University of Linz have found evidence for the design of so-called biomimetic catalysts.

Chemistry - Physics - 06.01.2020
A greener, simpler way to create syngas
Researchers from UCLA Samueli School of Engineering and Rice University have developed an easier and greener way to create syngas. A study detailing Syngas (the term is short for “synthesis gas”) is a mixture of carbon monoxide and hydrogen gases. It is used to make ammonia, methanol, other industrial chemicals and fuels.

Physics - Chemistry - 04.01.2020
Clusters of gold atoms form peculiar pyramidal shape
Clusters of gold atoms form peculiar pyramidal shape
Freestanding clusters of twenty gold atoms take the shape of a pyramid, researchers discovered. This is in contrast with most elements, which organize themselves by forming shells around one central atom. The team of researchers led by KU Leuven published their findings in Science Advances . Clusters composed of a few atoms tend to be spherical.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 03.01.2020
Biodegradable bridges
Globe magazine , News By: Samuel Schlaefli Researchers are looking into new materials to lay the foundations for living structures that respond to their environment. They aim to create self-sustaining infrastructures that can monitor their condition and even repair themselves. When Eleni Chatzi is not busy reading technical papers about vibrating bridges, smart infrastructures and data-driven engineering, she enjoys immersing herself in science fiction novels.

Health - Chemistry - 03.01.2020
Breakthrough study on molecular interactions could improve development of new medicines
A first-of-its-kind study on molecular interactions by biomedical engineers in the University of Minnesota's College of Science and Engineering will make it easier and more efficient for scientists to develop new medicines and other therapies for diseases such as cancer, HIV and autoimmune diseases. The study resulted in a mathematical framework that simulates the effects of the key parameters that control interactions between molecules that have multiple binding sites, as is the case for many medicines.

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