news 2020

« BACK

Health



Results 1 - 20 of 87.
1 2 3 4 5 Next »


Pharmacology - Health - 24.01.2020
Drug used widely to treat eye condition has ’no benefit’
Researchers from the University of Bristol and University Hospital Southampton have found that a drug used widely to treat a common eye condition has 'no benefit' and should no longer be used. Eplerenone, which is primarily used to treat heart failure, is currently offered widely by ophthalmologists as a treatment for central serous chorioretinopathy (CSCR) based on limited clinical data.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.01.2020
Preventing metastasis by stopping cancer cells from making fat
In brief  (18 seconds of reading): Olivier Feron , a UCLouvain researcher, studies how cancer spreads through the body via metastasis His major discovery was that cancer cells multiply by using lipids as food. His latest discovery, published in the scientific , is that lipid storage promotes cancer invasiveness A new drug currently being tested to treat obesity may also help fight metastasis Olivier Feron, a researcher at the University of Louvain (UCLouvain) Institute of Experimental and Clinical Research, seeks to understand how metastases form from a tumour.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.01.2020
Reveals stark inconsistencies in official UK guidance on Lyme disease
Reveals stark inconsistencies in official UK guidance on Lyme disease
Research reveals stark inconsistencies in official UK guidance on Lyme disease Official guidance on the diagnosis and testing of Lyme disease contains worrying inconsistencies, according to a new research paper. Professor Alex Faulkner at the University of Sussex, and national patient organisation Lyme Research UK have revealed stark discrepancies between the different policy and clinical practice guidance documents issued by Public Health England and other health bodies.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2020
Researchers reconstruct 500 million years of insect evolution
Researchers reconstruct 500 million years of insect evolution
Arthropods, a group of animals including next to insects also spiders or crustaceans, make up the most species-rich and diverse group of animals on Earth, with numerous adaptations that have allowed them to exploit all major ecosystems. However, what genetic mechanisms are responsible for their great evolutionary success' A team of international researchers studied now these species and tracked the evolutionary origin of key adaptations.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.01.2020
Printing objects that can incorporate living organisms
A 3D printing system that controls the behavior of live bacteria could someday enable medical devices with therapeutic agents built in. The technique may lead to 3D printing of biomedical tools, such as customized braces, that incorporate living cells to produce therapeutic compunds such as painkillers or topical treatments, the researchers say.

Health - Physics - 22.01.2020
Portable device helps doctors diagnose sepsis faster
Portable device helps doctors diagnose sepsis faster
EPFL researchers have developed a highly sensitive and portable optical biosensor that stands to accelerate the diagnosis of fatal conditions like sepsis. It could be used by ambulances and hospitals to improve the triage process and save lives. Sepsis claims one life every four seconds. It is the primary cause of death in hospitals, and one of the ten leading causes of death worldwide.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.01.2020
Male fertility after chemotherapy: new questions raised
Channels McGill University News and Events A pilot study conducted by INRS and McGill researchers highlights the effect of chemotherapy on male fertility before and after puberty. "It is often thought that cancer treatments for prepubescent boys will have no effect on their fertility because their testicles would be "dormant".

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2020
Surprise discovery shakes up our understanding of gene expression
A group of University of Chicago scientists has uncovered a previously unknown way that our genes are made into reality. Rather than directions going one-way from DNA to RNA to proteins, the latest study shows that RNA itself modulates how DNA is transcribed-using a chemical process that is increasingly apparent to be vital to biology.

Health - 22.01.2020
Full influenza vaccination among children cuts hospitalization in half
Fully vaccinating children reduces the risk of hospitalization associated with influenza by 54%, according to a study by researchers at the University of Michigan, the Clalit Research Institute, and Ben-Gurion University in Israel. The study, published in the December 2019 issue of the journal Clinical Infectious Disease, is one of the few studies worldwide that has tested the effectiveness of childhood vaccination against influenza and risk of hospitalization due to influenza complications.

Health - 22.01.2020
Europe is ready to respond to Coronavirus outbreak
Europe is ready to respond to Coronavirus outbreak
Herman Goossens (UAntwerp) is following the events closely to ensure health and security of European citizens.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.01.2020
Possible Parkinson’s treatment successfully targets two major nerve systems
Scientists have discovered that a non-invasive technique which could one day be used to treat Parkinson's disease, can successfully target a highly specific group of brain cells which play a key role in development of the condition. In 2015, scientists demonstrated that a form of gene therapy could target and stimulate a group of nerve cells affected by the disease, called cholinergic neurons.

Health - Physics - 22.01.2020
Magnetised molecules used to monitor breast cancer
Magnetised molecules used to monitor breast cancer
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Health - Pharmacology - 21.01.2020
Leuven researchers present technique to grow tissue implants for bone defects
Researchers from KU Leuven and University Hospitals Leuven have managed to engineer living implants in the lab by mimicking how bone tissue is created in an embryo. The technology paves the way for bone-regenerating tissue implants created on an industrial scale using 3D bioprinting. The researchers expect the first living implants to be available to patients in four years.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.01.2020
Immune cell health discovery could optimise cancer therapies
Scientists at UCL have discovered how immune cells, essential for tackling infections and cancers, are able to 'recycle' material within themselves in order to stay healthy and function, a breakthrough finding which could lead to more effective immunotherapies. In the study, published in Cell Reports , researchers investigated how 'autophagy' - the natural physiological process of 'self-eating' which allows intracellular components, such as mitochondria, to be degraded and replaced - takes place in liver-based T cells.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.01.2020
Health gap between rich and poor has widened
The health of the poorest people in Britain has declined since the mid-20th century, and is worse when compared to those born a century ago, suggests a new UCL-led study. The study, published in the BMJ Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health , compared health and income data from more than 200,000 working-age adults who were born between 1920 and 1970.

Health - 21.01.2020
’Love hormone’ improves attachment issues in people with autism
Oxytocin, often dubbed the 'love hormone', is known to promote social bonding. Researchers at KU Leuven have now discovered that administering oxytocin to adult men with autism makes them more open to close emotional bonds with others. The hormone has positive long-term effects as well.  A team led by Professor Kaat Alaerts (KU Leuven) recruited 40 adult men with autism spectrum disorder to take part in their study.  "In a first stage, we examined the amount of oxytocin produced by the participants themselves.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.01.2020
Putting a finger on the switch of chronic parasite infection
Putting a finger on the switch of chronic parasite infection
Researchers find master regulator needed for Toxoplasma gondii parasite to chronically infect host; promising step toward infection treatment, prevention. Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) is a parasite that chronically infects up to a quarter of the world's population, causing toxoplasmosis, a disease that can be dangerous, or even deadly, for the immunocompromised and for developing fetuses.

Environment - Health - 21.01.2020
Festival fireworks celebrations’ health impact on vulnerable people - study
Fireworks associated with festival celebrations such as Australia Day, China's Lunar New Year and Fourth of July, in the USA, may have a significant impact on the health of vulnerable people - a new study reveals. Using fireworks during these celebrations generates anthropogenic source of air pollutants with significant impacts on local air quality, creating up to eight times the average of particulate matter (PM) concentration in the environment during and immediately after the event.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.01.2020
Cardiac and visual degeneration arrested by a food supplement
Cardiac and visual degeneration arrested by a food supplement
UNIGE researchers have discovered a new gene that causes blindness and cardiomyopathy. They have also managed to halt the progression of eye disease and treat cardiac disease by administering a food supplement. Our genome consists of 20,000 genes, all of which may be capable of triggering disease. It is estimated that there are 7,000 unknown genes that cause recessive genetic diseases resulting from mutations in two copies of a gene that have been inherited from each parent.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.01.2020
Our biological clock plays crucial role in healing from surgery
Channels McGill University News and Events If you have just had knee, shoulder or hip surgery, you may want to take anti-inflammatories in the morning or at noon, but not at night. A McGill-led study shows, for the first time, that circadian clock genes are involved in healing from surgery. Indeed, the researchers demonstrated that anti-inflammatory medications are most effective in promoting post-operative healing and recovery when taken during the active periods of our biological clocks.
1 2 3 4 5 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |