news 2020

« BACK

Health



Results 1 - 20 of 382.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 20 Next »


Pharmacology - Health - 02.04.2020
Researchers lead trial to test remdesivir drug on COVID-19 patients
Patients with severe COVID-19 are being recruited to test the drug remdesivir as part of a new trial which is being led by the MRC Clinical Trials Unit at UCL. The trial is the first academic study of the drug as a treatment for coronavirus to take place in the UK The Adaptive COVID-19 Treatment Trial (ACTT-EU/UK) trial, which is taking place in about 75 hospitals globally, recruited its first UK patient this week.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 02.04.2020
EPFL software to enable secure data-sharing for hospitals
EPFL software to enable secure data-sharing for hospitals
The MedCo system aims to facilitate medical research on pathologies - such as cancer and infectious diseases - by enabling secure computations on decentralized data. The unique software has recently been deployed at three Swiss hospitals. MedCo was first released in 2019 as the first operational system to protect sensitive patient data so that it can be used collectively for medical research.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
Researchers help show it's possible to reuse N95 masks
Researchers help show it’s possible to reuse N95 masks
Researchers from Stanford and other universities scoured the scientific literature to create N95decon.org, a web portal that medical professionals can access for trustworthy information on how to decontaminate used N95 masks. As health workers and first responders in the United States try to stem a pandemic without adequate protective gear, health officials are forced to consider a stopgap - decontaminating and reusing N95 masks to shield those whose jobs expose them to the virus that causes COVID-19.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.04.2020
New blood test can detect wide range of cancers
New blood test can detect wide range of cancers
A new blood test that can detect more than 50 types of cancer with high accuracy has been developed by an international team of researchers co-led by UCL. It is expected that the study , published in Annals of Oncology , will play a key role in early detection of cancer, which can often be critical to successful treatment.    The test, developed by GRAIL, looks for tell-tale chemical changes to bits of genetic code - cell-free DNA - that leak from tumours into the bloodstream.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
New sensors could offer early detection of lung tumors
New sensors could offer early detection of lung tumors
People who are at high risk of developing lung cancer, such as heavy smokers, are routinely screened with computed tomography (CT), which can detect tumors in the lungs. However, this test has an extremely high rate of false positives, as it also picks up benign nodules in the lungs. Researchers at MIT have now developed a new approach to early diagnosis of lung cancer: a urine test that can detect the presence of proteins linked to the disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
Suspect cells' 'neighbor' implicated in colorectal cancer
Suspect cells’ ’neighbor’ implicated in colorectal cancer
Colorectal cancer kills more than 50,000 people a year in the United States alone, but scientists have struggled to find the exact mechanisms that trigger the growth of tumors in the intestine. Cancer researchers have zeroed in on a tightly sequestered group of stem cells within the intestine as suspects in the development of colon cancer but have been unable to explain exactly how genetic mutations within those stem cells can cause tumors of the digestive track.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.04.2020
UK genome analysis has important implications for COVID-19 clinical trials
Researchers from Bristol's School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine have been growing the live human SARS-CoV-2 virus in a controlled lab to investigate what the virus is doing inside monkey and human cells. Using state-of-the-art scientific techniques, the team isolated parts of the SARS-CoV-2 virus to find out how the virus instructs the cell to make virus proteins, which can either be used to form virus particles or slow our immune response.

Health - Innovation - 01.04.2020
Scientists working to improve facemasks used by COVID-19 frontline NHS staff
Scientists at the Healthcare Technologies Institute, University of Birmingham and King's College London are working on a solution to improve the seal and fit of facemasks used in hospitals during the COVID-19 crisis. Since the onset of the crisis the subject of personal protective equipment (PPE) has become a key discussion point.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.04.2020
Blocking the Iron Transport Could Stop Tuberculosis
Blocking the Iron Transport Could Stop Tuberculosis
The bacteria that cause tuberculosis need iron to survive. Researchers at the University of Zurich have now solved the first detailed structure of the transport protein responsible for the iron supply. When the iron transport into the bacteria is inhibited, the pathogen can no longer grow. This opens novel ways to develop targeted tuberculosis drugs.

Physics - Health - 31.03.2020
New quantum technology could help diagnose and treat heart condition
The conductivity of living organs, such as the heart, could be imaged non-invasively using quantum technology developed by UCL researchers, which has the potential to revolutionise the diagnosis and treatment of atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a heart condition that causes an irregular and abnormally fast heart rate, potentially leading to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications.

Health - Veterinary Science - 31.03.2020
Opinion: Can cats really get or pass on COVID-19, as a report from Belgium suggests?
Should we be concerned about the coronavirus spreading to cats' Not yet, says Dr Sarah Caddy in this article for The Conversation, even after a concerning report from Belgium. After reports of two dogs testing positive for SARS-CoV-2 in Hong Kong, the most recent news to cause alarm among animal owners is that of a cat in Belgium with apparent symptoms of the virus that causes COVID-19.

Health - Pharmacology - 31.03.2020
Yale findings expand understanding of fertility after chemotherapy
Women with a fairly common type of genetic mutation face a greater risk of infertility following chemotherapy for breast cancer, according to a new study from Yale fertility expert and scientist Dr. Kutluk Oktay. The findings suggest that women with the mutation should carefully consider their options for preserving fertility before initiating chemotherapy treatment.

Business / Economics - Health - 31.03.2020
The data speak: Stronger pandemic response yields better economic recovery
Study of 1918 flu pandemic shows U.S. cities that responded more aggressively in health terms also had better economic rebounds. The research described in this article has been published as a working paper but has not yet been peer-reviewed by experts in the field. With much of the U.S. in shutdown mode to limit the spread of the Covid-19 disease, a debate has sprung up about when the country might "reopen" commerce, to limit economic fallout from the pandemic.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.03.2020
Identification of viruses and bacteria could be sped up through computational methods
Identification of viruses and bacteria could be sped up through computational methods
A new multinational study has shown how the process of distinguishing viruses and bacteria could be accelerated through the use of computational methods. The researchers, led by the University of Edinburgh, with colleagues from Cambridge, London, Slovenia and China, used a combination of theoretical and experimental methods to develop a strategy to detect the DNA of infectious diseases.

Health - Environment - 30.03.2020
Hopes of pandemic respite this spring may depend upon what happens indoors
Hopes of pandemic respite this spring may depend upon what happens indoors
How much spring and summer affect the COVID-19 pandemic may depend not only on the effectiveness of social distancing measures, but also on the environment inside our buildings, according to a review of Yale scientists of their own work and that of colleagues on how respiratory viruses are transmitted.

Health - 30.03.2020
Retail operations models could streamline COVID-19 logistics
Where to site COVID-19 testing facilities and how to stock them. How to triage patients and allocate hospital resources. The best ways to manage supply chains for food and other essentials. Solutions to these logistical puzzles posed by the COVID-19 crisis may lie in operations models used in the retail sector, says Siqian Shen, an engineering researcher at the University of Michigan.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.03.2020
Universities join forces to help pandemic fight
Scientists at the Universities of Dundee are Glasgow are combining their expertise to aid the global battle against coronavirus. The collaboration brings world-leading researchers at Medical Research Council-funded units at both institutions together to generate biological tools that will enable them to study the virus and identify ways of defeating it.

Health - 30.03.2020
Historical coronaviruses show evidence of seasonality & immunity
Using historical data, a UCL research team has found that levels of infection from three common coronaviruses appear to have followed a seasonal pattern in England, with peaks occurring during winter and broadly at the same time as influenza. The researchers found that only small amounts of coronavirus were transmitted in the summer.

Health - Environment - 30.03.2020
Emergency demolitions in Detroit: Low risk of asbestos exposure
As Detroit continues to revitalize its urban core by razing abandoned buildings, emissions of airborne asbestos during emergency demolitions have been negligible, say University of Michigan researchers. This suggests that the asbestos-related risk to human health from these demolitions-which account for about 10% of all demolitions in the city-is virtually nonexistent.

Health - Pharmacology - 30.03.2020
"Living drug factories" might treat diabetes and other diseases
Chemical engineers have developed a way to protect transplanted drug-producing cells from immune system rejection. One promising way to treat diabetes is with transplanted islet cells that produce insulin when blood sugar levels get too low. However, patients who receive such transplants must take drugs to prevent their immune systems from rejecting the transplanted cells, so the treatment is not often used.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 20 Next »

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |