news 2020

« BACK

Materials Science



Results 1 - 9 of 9.


Materials Science - 23.01.2020
Discovery sheds new light on how cells move
Assistant Professor Jacob Notbohm (left) and doctoral student Aashrith Saraswathibhatla observe cells in Notbohm's Lab. Photo by UW-Madison College of Engineering When we cut our skin, groups of cells rush en masse to the site to heal the wound. But the complicated mechanics of this collective cell movement - which are facilitated by rearrangements between each cell and its neighbors - have made it challenging for researchers to decipher what's actually driving it.

Physics - Materials Science - 20.01.2020
Record-breaking Terahertz Laser Beam
Record-breaking Terahertz Laser Beam
A new, extremely efficient source of terahertz radiation has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna): Lasers turn air into plasma, thereby producing terahertz rays for many possible applications. Terahertz radiation is used for security checks at airports, for medical examinations and also for quality checks in industry.

Physics - Materials Science - 17.01.2020
A New Look at
A New Look at "Strange Metals"
For years, a new synthesis method has been developed at TU Wien (Vienna) to unlock the secrets of "strange metals". Now a breakthrough has been achieved. The results have been published in "Science". Superconductors allow electrical current to flow without any resistance - but only below a certain critical temperature.

Physics - Materials Science - 16.01.2020
Finds billions of quantum entangled electrons in 'strange metal'
Finds billions of quantum entangled electrons in ’strange metal’
Physicists provide direct evidence of entanglement's role in quantum criticality In a new study, U.S. and Austrian physicists have observed quantum entanglement among "billions of billions” of flowing electrons in a quantum critical material. The research, which appears this week in Science, examined the electronic and magnetic behavior of a "strange metal” compound of ytterbium, rhodium and silicon as it both neared and passed through a critical transition at the boundary between two well-studied quantum phases.

Materials Science - 14.01.2020
Researchers break the geometric limitations of moiré pattern in graphene heterostructures
Researchers break the geometric limitations of moiré pattern in graphene heterostructures
Researchers at the University of Manchester in collaboration with CMT theorists (M. Andelkovic, S. Milovanovic, L. Covaci and F. Peeters) have uncovered interesting phenomena when multiple two-dimensional materials are combined into van der Waals heterostructures (layered 'sandwiches' of different materials).

Materials Science - Physics - 13.01.2020
A new approach to making airplane parts, minus the massive infrastructure
A new approach to making airplane parts, minus the massive infrastructure
Carbon nanotube film produces aerospace-grade composites with no need for huge ovens or autoclaves. A modern airplane's fuselage is made from multiple sheets of different composite materials, like so many layers in a phyllo-dough pastry. Once these layers are stacked and molded into the shape of a fuselage, the structures are wheeled into warehouse-sized ovens and autoclaves, where the layers fuse together to form a resilient, aerodynamic shell.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 10.01.2020
An 18-carat gold nugget made of plastic
An 18-carat gold nugget made of plastic
ETH researchers have created an incredibly lightweight 18-carat gold, using a matrix of plastic in place of metallic alloy elements. Lovers of gold watches and heavy jewellery will be thrilled. The objects of their desire may someday become much lighter, but without losing any of their glitter. Especially with watches, a small amount of weight can make all the difference.

Materials Science - Health - 09.01.2020
Bandage material helps stop bleeding without adhering to the wound
Bandage material helps stop bleeding without adhering to the wound
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the National University of Singapore have developed a new kind of bandage that helps blood to clot and doesn't stick to the wound. This marks the first time that scientists have combined both properties in one material. "We did not actually plan this, but that is just how science works sometimes: you start researching one thing and end up somewhere else," says ETH Professor Dimos Poulikakos.

Materials Science - 08.01.2020
Early humans optimised stone tool use at Tanzania’s Olduvai Gorge
Early Stone Age populations living up to 1.8 million years ago made complex decisions in selecting different types of stone to optimise a variety of cutting tools, according to a new study by UCL, University of Kent and the Centre for Human and Social Sciences, Spain. The study, published in the Journal of Royal Society Interface , offers new insight into the complexity of stone tool use, design and production.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |