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Physics - Materials Science - 01.04.2020
New Superconducting Film Resists a Magnet’s Power to Thwart It
To Joseph Falson , who recently joined Caltech as assistant professor of materials science, electrons are like exotic supercars because they possess amazing capabilities. Consider the phenomenon of superconductivity, in which paired electrons fly unimpeded, resulting in materials that display zero electrical resistance.

Physics - Materials Science - 01.04.2020
Technique reveals how crystals form on surfaces
Technique reveals how crystals form on surfaces
DNA-based self-assembling system sheds light on processes essential for semiconductors and nanotechnology. The process of crystallization, in which atoms or molecules line up in orderly arrays like soldiers in formation, is the basis for many of the materials that define modern life, including the silicon in microchips and solar cells.

Physics - Materials Science - 31.03.2020
Way to extract colour from black
Scientists have developed a way of extracting a richer palette of colours from the available spectrum by harnessing disordered patterns inspired by nature that would typically be seen as black. Colours that we see in nature often come from nanoscale patterns that reflect light back in particular ways.

History / Archeology - Materials Science - 31.03.2020
Mesoamerican copper smelting technology aided colonial weaponry
Mesoamerican copper smelting technology aided colonial weaponry
Spanish conquerors depended on indigenous expertise to keep up their munitions supplies, archaeologists have found. When Spanish invaders arrived in the Americas, they were generally able to subjugate the local peoples thanks, in part, to their superior weaponry and technology. But archeological evidence indicates that, in at least one crucial respect, the Spaniards were quite dependent on an older indigenous technology in parts of Mesoamerica (today's Mexico, Guatemala, Belize, and Honduras).

Materials Science - Computer Science / Telecom - 26.03.2020
Designing lightweight glass for efficient cars, wind turbines
Designing lightweight glass for efficient cars, wind turbines
FACULTY Q&A Liang Qi , a professor of materials science and engineering at the University of Michigan, answered questions about his group's new paper in npj Computational Materials. What is elastic stiffness' Elastic and glass don't seem to be two words that go together. All solid materials, including glass, have a property called elastic stiffness-also known as elastic modulus.

Materials Science - Physics - 25.03.2020
Neural networks facilitate optimization in the search for new materials
Neural networks facilitate optimization in the search for new materials
Sorting through millions of possibilities, a search for battery materials delivered results in five weeks instead of 50 years. When searching through theoretical lists of possible new materials for particular applications, such as batteries or other energy-related devices, there are often millions of potential materials that could be considered, and multiple criteria that need to be met and optimized at once.

Materials Science - 25.03.2020
Printing complex cellulose-based objects
Printing complex cellulose-based objects
Researchers from ETH Zurich and the Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Science and Technology (Empa) have set a new world record: they 3D printed complex objects with higher cellulose content than that of any other additively manufactured cellulose-based parts. To achieve this, they used a clever trick.

Materials Science - Physics - 24.03.2020
Activating palladium catalysis by light: teaching an old transition metal new tricks
Activating palladium catalysis by light: teaching an old transition metal new tricks
In the production of compounds, chemists have the fundamental goal of finding strategies that are most selective and avoid waste products. Breakthroughs in this area serve, among other things, to drive industrial innovation and drug development. In this context, allylic substitution reactions using catalysts made of so-called transition metals have already led to significant advances in science.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 23.03.2020
The growth of an organism rides on a pattern of waves
The growth of an organism rides on a pattern of waves
Study shows ripples across a newly fertilized egg are similar to other systems, from ocean and atmospheric circulations to quantum fluids. When an egg cell of almost any sexually reproducing species is fertilized, it sets off a series of waves that ripple across the egg's surface. These waves are produced by billions of activated proteins that surge through the egg's membrane like streams of tiny burrowing sentinels, signaling the egg to start dividing, folding, and dividing again, to form the first cellular seeds of an organism.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 23.03.2020
One Step Closer to a Fast-Charging Battery
One Step Closer to a Fast-Charging Battery
In collaboration with Brookhaven National Lab, Berkeley Lab researchers were able to visualize a key feature of lithium titanate Berkeley Lab researchers, working with a team at Brookhaven National Laboratory, have made a key discovery about the dynamic structural changes in a material called lithium titanate, putting scientists one step closer to achieving a fast-charging lithium battery.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 20.03.2020
How to get conductive gels to stick when wet
How to get conductive gels to stick when wet
A new way of making polymers adhere to surfaces may enable better biomedical sensors and implants. But there has been a sticking point preventing their widespread use: their inability to adhere to a surface such as a sensor or microchip, and stay put despite moisture from the body. Now, researchers at MIT have come up with a way of getting conductive polymer gels to adhere to wet surfaces.

Materials Science - Physics - 16.03.2020
Deep learning for mechanical property evaluation
New technique allows for more precise measurements of deformation characteristics using nanoindentation tools. A standard method for testing some of the mechanical properties of materials is to poke them with a sharp point. This "indentation technique" can provide detailed measurements of how the material responds to the point's force, as a function of its penetration depth.

Astronomy / Space Science - Materials Science - 12.03.2020
Puzzle about nitrogen solved thanks to cometary analogues
Puzzle about nitrogen solved thanks to cometary analogues
One of the basic building blocks of life is nitrogen. An international consortium was able to detect ammonium salt containing nitrogen on the cometary surface of Chury thanks to a method using analogues for comet material. The method on which the study on the detection of ammonium salt is based was developed at the University of Bern.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 11.03.2020
Nano-sponge with extreme properties
Nano-sponge with extreme properties
A new process simplifies the fabrication of porous materials with a defined nanostructure and takes them one step closer to mass production. Materials with a defined nanostructure can have surprising properties. One example is a lightweight ceramic that springs back to its original shape, like a sponge, after being compressed.

Physics - Materials Science - 09.03.2020
UCLA-led research team produces most accurate 3D images of ’2D materials’
A UCLA-led research team has produced in unprecedented detail experimental three-dimensional maps of the atoms in a so-called 2D material — matter that isn't truly two-dimensional but is nearly flat because it's arranged in extremely thin layers, no more than a few atoms thick. Although 2D-materials-based technologies have not yet been widely used in commercial applications, the materials have been the subject of considerable research interest.

Astronomy / Space Science - Materials Science - 06.03.2020
Dimming Betelgeuse likely isn't cold, just dusty
Dimming Betelgeuse likely isn’t cold, just dusty
Late last year, news broke that the star Betelgeuse was fading significantly, ultimately dropping to around 40% of its usual brightness. The activity fueled popular speculation that the red supergiant would soon explode as a massive supernova. But astronomers have more benign theories to explain the star's dimming behavior.

Materials Science - Health - 05.03.2020
Bacteria killed by new light-activated coating
A new coating that activates in low intensity light to kill bacteria such as Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli has been developed by a UCL-led team of researchers. To stop the spread of disease, it could be used to coat phone screens and keyboards, as well as the inside of catheters and breathing tubes, which are a major source of healthcare-associated infections (HCAIs).

Materials Science - 05.03.2020
World's smelliest fruit could charge your mobile phone
World’s smelliest fruit could charge your mobile phone
A University of Sydney researcher has developed a new method using the world's most repulsive smelling fruit. Turning durian waste into super-capacitors could "substantially reduce" the cost of energy storage and charge devices very quickly. Imagine if we could use naturally-grown products, like plants and fruit, to store the electricity that charges commonly used electronics, like mobile phones, tablets, laptops or even electric cars?

Physics - Materials Science - 04.03.2020
New optical system could lead to devices that can recognize objects instantly
A technology developed at the UCLA Samueli School of Engineering could one day make it possible to produce optical devices that can instantaneously recognize objects without additional computer processing. The technology could ultimately be useful for robots, autonomous vehicles and other applications.

Physics - Materials Science - 04.03.2020
Graphene: A Talented 2D Material Gets a New Gig
Graphene: A Talented 2D Material Gets a New Gig
Berkeley Lab scientists tap into graphene's hidden talent as an electrically tunable superconductor, insulator, and magnetic device for the advancement of quantum information science E ver since graphene's discovery in 2004, scientists have looked for ways to put this talented, atomically thin 2D material to work.
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