news 2020

« BACK

Politics



Results 1 - 20 of 23.


Social Sciences - Politics - 15.10.2020
Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
Empathy exacerbates discussions about immigration
If both camps take a more empathetic approach when there's an argument, it generally makes it easier to listen to what the other side is saying and alleviate tension. This isn't the case, however, when the conflict is about immigration. Discussions about immigration are heated, even antagonistic. But what happens when supporters and opponents undertake to show more empathy and engage in perspective taking, two types of behaviour that can ease tension?

Politics - Environment - 15.10.2020
Unequal distribution of research into marine resources
Unequal distribution of research into marine resources
Exploration and utilisation of resources from the world's oceans is not equally distributed across the globe. Although many of these resources originate in the Global South, they are mostly being researched by just a few countries from the North. Accordingly, this is also where most of the benefits and profits are flowing to, despite the Convention on Biological Diversity.

Politics - Campus - 08.10.2020
Women’s Incomes Improve When Democrats Hold Public Office
In an increasingly polarized political system, Democratic control has a meaningful impact on narrowing the gender gap New research from the University of California San Diego reveals that Democratic control of state houses leads to substantial improvement in women's incomes, wages and unemployment relative to men.

Life Sciences - Politics - 06.10.2020
Battling with neighbours could make animals smarter
Battling with neighbours could make animals smarter
Fighting in baboons can be fierce David Clode Like Napoleon Bonaparte, chimpanzees are masters of intergroup conflict Franceso Ungaro [chimpanzee photograph] Vigilance is key in a world of rival outsiders Andy Radford [meerkat photograph]; Michalis Mantelos [red-ruffed lemur photograph] 6 October 2020 From ants to primates, 'Napoleonic' intelligence has evolved to help animals contend with the myriad cognitive challenges arising from interactions with rival outsiders, suggest researchers at the University of Bristol in a paper published today [Tuesday 6 October].

Politics - Environment - 28.09.2020
The 2020 U.S. election, issues and challenges
From addressing how to vote safely during a pandemic to tackling disinformation and misinformation on social media, Stanford scholars examine the issues and uncertainties facing American voters as they cast their ballot in November's general election.

Politics - Health - 04.09.2020
Mask mandates delayed by nearly a month in Republican-led states, UW study finds
Mask mandates delayed by nearly a month in Republican-led states, UW study finds
Politics, above COVID-19 cases or deaths, determined whether states enacted mask mandates during the first months of the pandemic, a new study finds. States with Republican governors delayed imposing indoor mask requirements by an average of nearly 30 days, controlling for other factors.

Politics - Health - 03.09.2020
Examining effects, challenges of mail-in voting
Mail-in voting has come under partisan scrutiny, but according to Stanford research, it does not appear to benefit one political party over the other. However, challenges to mail-in and absentee voting remain as states and voters make a shift this November. As the coronavirus persists and the U.S. November election nears, some states are expanding options for voters to cast their ballot either by mail or absentee - a decision that has raised concerns that mail-in voting could favor one political party over the other.

Politics - 02.09.2020
Political ads have little persuasive power
Every four years, U.S. presidential campaigns collectively spend billions of dollars flooding TV screens across the country with political ads. But a new study co-authored by Yale political scientist Alexander Coppock shows that, regardless of content, context, or audience, those pricey commercials do little to persuade voters.  The study, published Sept.

Politics - 11.08.2020
Americans prize party loyalty over democratic principles
Americans prize party loyalty over democratic principles
It is conventional wisdom that Americans cherish democracy - but a new study by Yale political scientists reports that only a small fraction of U.S. voters are willing to sacrifice their partisan and policy interests to defend democratic principles.    The study, published in the American Political Science Review, found that only 3.5% of U.S. voters would cast ballots against their preferred candidates as punishment for undemocratic behavior, such as supporting gerrymandering, disenfranchisement, or press restrictions.

Politics - 30.06.2020
Ethnolinguistic diversity slows down urban growth
Ethnolinguistic diversity slows down urban growth
Where various ethnic groups live together, cities grow at a slower rate. That is the conclusion reached by a researcher from the University of Basel and his colleagues based on worldwide data that shows how the diversity of language groups in 1975 has influenced urban growth 40 years later. The scientists have reported their findings in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Environment - Politics - 26.06.2020
Want to persuade an opponent? Try listening, Berkeley scholar says
With the nation deeply polarized, research by David Broockman and Joshua Kalla has found that advocates for hot-button issues can improve their chances of changing an opponent's mind when they ask questions, listen sincerely and engage them with stories. (Photo by Tania Liu via Flickr The nation is locked in a state of polarization unprecedented in the past half-century, with deep, volatile divisions around issues of politics, race, religion and the environment.

Law - Politics - 25.06.2020
Skewing the Vote
V oter ID laws are becoming more common and more strict, and the stakes for American democracy are high and growing higher by the year. New research from the University of California San Diego provides evidence that voter ID laws disproportionately reduce voter turnout in more racially diverse areas.

Politics - 11.06.2020
Effective communication between politicians and constituents vital for sustained political participation, experts say
The way politicians communicate with constituents has never been more important than during the Covid-19 pandemic, say experts. Dr Nikki Soo of Cardiff University led a study with Dr James Weinberg and Dr Kate Dommett at the University of Sheffield, which investigated how people reacted to different communications they might receive from an MP.

Social Sciences - Politics - 19.05.2020
Brexit changed people's perception of immigrants for the better
Brexit changed people’s perception of immigrants for the better
New research by academics from four Universities including the University of Birmingham has found that anti-immigrant attitudes in the UK softened immediately following the Brexit referendum of 2016, among both Leave and Remain supporters. The report, ‘ A Populist Paradox? How Brexit Softened Anti-Immigrant Attitudes ' concludes that attitudes towards anti-immigration and anti-refugees were significantly softer even several months after the referendum.

Health - Politics - 05.05.2020
Bolsonaro's attitude to coronavirus increases 'risky behaviour' in Brazil
Bolsonaro’s attitude to coronavirus increases ’risky behaviour’ in Brazil
Study suggests that TV appearances by Bolsonaro led to millions more Brazilians ignoring social distancing in the days following broadcast. The attitude of a leader can have a significant and possibly devastating impact on individual health and the healthcare systems of a nation Tiago Cavalcanti Jair Bolsonaro's public undermining of pandemic prevention efforts reduces social distancing in the parts of Brazil where his voter base is strongest, according to a new study using location data from over 60 million phones.

Politics - 17.04.2020
On voting by mail shows neutral partisan effects
The coronavirus has disrupted state primaries and forced the prospect of major reforms for the 2020 election. Election officials across the nation are mulling expansions or transitions to mail-in voting while Congress is fielding calls for a nationwide vote-by-mail program. In examining voter data in three states with staggered rollouts of vote-by-mail programs ' California, Utah and Washington ' the researchers found that the introduction of mail-in voting did not have an effect, on average, on the share of voter turnout for either Republicans or Democrats.

Politics - 17.03.2020
Has a Bristol mayor made a difference?
Mayoral governance in Bristol has boosted the visibility of city leadership and helped promote Bristol on the national and international stage, a new study has found. The research by UWE Bristol and the University of Bristol also showed the mayoral model of leadership had unnecessarily restricted the role of councillors and reduced citizens' belief in their ability to influence decisions.

History / Archeology - Politics - 16.03.2020
Five things to ’dig’ about heritage at Durham
Our researchers are the history detectives, unearthing exciting things from our past and helping us learn from our ancestors. We are also the home to important cultural archives available for study. Here's From finding long a lost medieval chapel fit for a king, to discovering documents from our royal past.

Politics - 13.02.2020
What is love?
From the fields of science to sociology, politics and philosophy, here is what Stanford research says about love and romance, in the past and present day.   For centuries, people have tried to understand the behaviors and beliefs associated with falling in love. What explains the wide range of emotions people experience? How have notions of romance evolved over time? As digital media becomes a permanent fixture in people's lives, how have these technologies changed how people meet? Examining some of these questions are Stanford scholars.

Politics - 11.02.2020
Meet our new faculty: David Broockman, political science
Name: David Broockman Degrees: B.A., Yale University, 2011; Ph.D., UC Berkeley, 2015 Research interests: I study how voters and politicians make decisions, generally using real-world field experiments that allow for rigorous causal inferences. My recent research focuses on voter persuasion and how to measure how well voters' views are represented.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |