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Psychology - Health - 07.08.2020
Transgender and gender-diverse individuals are more likely to be autistic and report higher autistic traits
Transgender and gender-diverse individuals are more likely to be autistic and report higher autistic traits
Transgender and gender-diverse adults are three to six times more likely as cisgender adults (individuals whose gender identity corresponds to their sex assigned at birth) to be diagnosed as autistic, according to a new study by scientists at the University of Cambridge's Autism Research Centre. Both autistic individuals and transgender and gender-diverse individuals are marginalized and experience multiple vulnerabilities.

Psychology - 06.08.2020
Conforming to masculine norms may hinder men from seeking help
Share on: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn Some men find strength and stature by adhering to traditional masculine norms, yet these traits can pose as obstacles to mental and physical well-being. These norms surrounding manhood become barriers to young Black men reluctant to receiving the help they need, according to a new University of Michigan study published in the journal Social Work.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 04.08.2020
Key brain region was
Key brain region was "recycled" as humans developed the ability to read
Part of the visual cortex dedicated to recognizing objects appears predisposed to identifying words and letters, a study finds. Humans began to develop systems of reading and writing only within the past few thousand years. Our reading abilities set us apart from other animal species, but a few thousand years is much too short a timeframe for our brains to have evolved new areas specifically devoted to reading.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 22.07.2020
Mapping the brain's sensory gatekeeper
Mapping the brain’s sensory gatekeeper
New analysis could help uncover potential drug targets for attention deficits and sensory hypersensitivity. Many people with autism experience sensory hypersensitivity, attention deficits, and sleep disruption. One brain region that has been implicated in these symptoms is the thalamic reticular nucleus (TRN), which is believed to act as a gatekeeper for sensory information flowing to the cortex.

Psychology - 14.07.2020
Hidden Emotions in the Sound of Words
Psychological study shows connection between emotional arousal and assignment of sound sequences as well as associative meanings No 123/2020 from Jul 14, 2020 On the basis of psycholinguistic experiments, an international group of researchers including a cognitive neuroscientist at Freie Universität Berlin, has been able to demonstrate that emotions play a central role in the associations between the sounds of words and their meanings.

Psychology - 07.07.2020
Psychologists pinpoint psychological factors of refugee integration
Due to border closures in the wake of the corona crisis, the arrival of refugees in Europe has temporarily dipped. However, worldwide numbers of refugees have surged, again, within a year, driven by violence, war, persecution, economic hardship, or climate change. In the foreseeable future, many refugees will not be able to return to their homes.

Psychology - Administration - 03.07.2020
Compulsive internet use by teens linked to emotional issues: study
Compulsive internet use by teens linked to emotional issues: study
A new study has found internet addiction in teenagers leads to difficulty regulating emotions. However there was no evidence that pre-existing emotional issues are a predictor of obsessive internet use. Published in the peer-reviewed journal Emotion , the paper is the first longitudinal study to examine the connection between internet addiction among teenagers and emotion regulation difficulties.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 30.06.2020
From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Scientists have tracked the eye movements of children to show how they make the link - spontaneously and without instructions - between vocal emotion (happiness or anger) followed by a natural or virtual face. Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognise - spontaneously and without instructions - the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? A team of scientists from the University of Geneva and the Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences (CISA) has provided an initial response to this question.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 24.06.2020
Psychological research has a racism problem, Stanford scholar says
Psychological research has a racism problem, Stanford scholar says
Across five decades of psychological research, publications that highlight race are rare, and when race is discussed, it is authored mostly and edited almost entirely by white scholars, according to a new Stanford study. Race plays a critical role in shaping how people experience the world around them, so one would expect a rich body of literature published in mainstream psychological journals to examine its effects on people's thoughts, feelings and behavior.

Psychology - 18.06.2020
Decide Now or Wait for Something Better?
Decide Now or Wait for Something Better?
When we make decisions, we don't always have all options available to choose from at the same time. Instead they often come one after another, so we have to decide on something without knowing if a better option might have come along later. A study at the University of Zurich has shown that our standards drop more and more in the course of decision-making.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 15.06.2020
The psychology behind toilet paper hoarding
The psychology behind toilet paper hoarding
Following the rapid spread of COVID-19 in Europe and North America in March 2020, many people around the world began hoarding goods such as toilet paper. Some companies reported an increase in toilet paper sales of up to 700 percent, despite calls from governments to refrain from "panic buying". Which groups of people primarily hoarded all the toilet paper? Psychologists from the universities of St. Gallen and Münster and the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig investigated this question.

Psychology - 11.06.2020
Who we are depends on where we are
A new study found that places can change people's personality, and the opposite is also true: Certain personalities are drawn to different places. If complying with shelter-in-place orders has made you feel more disorganized or less kind than usual, it may be because that's what happens when you spend more time at home instead of public spaces, according to a new Stanford co-authored study.

Health - Psychology - 11.06.2020
NHS staff tackling Covid-19 try out virtual reality to help reduce stress and anxiety
NHS staff tackling Covid-19 on the front line are, for the first time, using virtual reality to help support their mental health and wellbeing. Twenty-one staff working in intensive care units at the Royal Glamorgan and Prince Charles hospitals had access to a single-use VR headset for two weeks to evaluate if it was a useful aid to help with stress and anxiety.

Psychology - Pedagogy - 02.06.2020
Mobile technology may support kids learning to recognize emotions in photos of faces
Yalda T. Uhls is child psychologist and researcher at UCLA, who studies how media affect children. She is the author of the book “Media Moms & Digital Dads: A Fact Not Fear Approach to Parenting in the Digital Age.” This article originally appeared in The Conversation. An essential social skill is understanding emotion.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 29.05.2020
Researchers use brain imaging to demonstrate weaker neural suppression in individuals with autism
People with autism spectrum disorder, or ASD, may experience sensory hypersensitivity more often than people without ASD, according to the National Autism Association. Among other responses, this hypersensitivity can lead to "sensory overload," when sensory systems like vision or hearing are "overwhelmed" by stimuli.

Health - Psychology - 22.05.2020
Conspiracy beliefs reduces the following of government coronavirus guidance | University of Oxford
A new study from the shows that people who hold coronavirus conspiracy beliefs are less likely to comply with social distancing guidelines or take-up future vaccines.  The research, led by clinical psychologists at the and published today in the journal  Psychological Medicine , indicates that a disconcertingly high number of adults in England do not agree with the scientific and governmental consensus on the coronavirus pandemic.

Health - Psychology - 22.05.2020
Conspiracy beliefs reduce the following of government coronavirus guidance
A new study from the University of Oxford shows that people who hold coronavirus conspiracy beliefs are less likely to comply with social distancing guidelines or take-up future vaccines.  The research, led by clinical psychologists at the University of Oxford and published today in the journal  Psychological Medicine , indicates that a disconcertingly high number of adults in England do not agree with the scientific and governmental consensus on the coronavirus pandemic.

Health - Psychology - 19.05.2020
Coronavirus infections may lead to delirium and potentially PTSD
Coronavirus infections may lead to delirium and potentially PTSD
People taken ill by coronavirus infections may experience psychiatric problems while hospitalised and potentially after they recover, suggests an analysis of past research led by the UCL Institute of Mental Health with King's College London collaborators. The systematic review paper, published in The Lancet Psychiatry , compiled results from shortand long-term studies of people hospitalised by recent coronaviruses, namely SARS (Severe acute respiratory syndrome) in 2002-2004, MERS (Middle East respiratory syndrome) in 2012, as well as COVID-19 this year.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 18.05.2020
Find more satisfaction by changing daily routines, study says
Published Monday , the study was conducted prior to the onset of the coro rus pandemic that has limited human movements around the globe. But the researchers believe it may offer insights for those confined to their homes and limited in their interactions by the guidelines and restrictions from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Psychology - 13.05.2020
Children with autism face higher risk of eating disorders
Children with autistic traits are more likely than their peers to develop an eating disorder, according to a new UCL-led study. Previous research has found that autism and eating disorders can occur together, as 20-30% of adults with eating disorders have autism, and 3-10% of children and young people with eating disorders.
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