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Social Sciences - 10.07.2020
Questions Benefits of Social Networks in Disasters
Communication within groups not as helpful as anticipated during disaster response Faced with a common peril, people delay making decisions that might save lives, fail to alert each other to danger and spread misinformation. Those may sound like behaviors associated with the current pandemic, but they actually surfaced in experiments on how social networks function in emergencies.

Social Sciences - Health - 09.07.2020
Children in poverty at greater risk of childhood traumas
Children whose parents report poverty in pregnancy are nine times more likely to face additional traumatic experiences compared to their wealthier peers, UCL research finds. Academics from UCL's ESRC International Centre for Lifecourse Studies analysed data taken over two decades from 14,000 women, their children and partners, to explore the connections between commonly investigated adverse childhood experiences (ACEs)*.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 08.07.2020
Kids who get on best with mum and dad top the class in maths
Kids who get on best with mum and dad top the class in maths
Children who have a harmonious relationship with their parents have the edge over their peers in maths, a new study by the University of Sussex reveals. The progress in maths made by year six pupils with the most harmonious relationships with their parents was a third higher compared to children with the least harmonious, according to the study published today by the Royal Society.

Health - Social Sciences - 08.07.2020
Coronavirus disproportionately harms U.S. prison population
People incarcerated in U.S. prisons tested positive for COVID-19 at a rate 5.5 times higher than the general public, according to a new paper co-authored by the UCLA COVID-19 Behind Bars Data Project and researchers at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. In their report , which was published today in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the researchers also found that the death rate of U.S. prisoners was 39 per 100,000 people, higher than the U.S. population rate of 29 deaths per 100,000.

Social Sciences - 07.07.2020
Talking with parents empowers Latino youths to engage in community
Share on: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn When Latino youths lend their voices to political causes-from immigration policies that have separated families to recent Black Lives Matter protests-their resilience originates from home. A new University of Michigan study suggests that when Latino youths have conversations surrounding their ethnic heritage and history at home, they also tend to discuss contemporary political issues.

Health - Social Sciences - 07.07.2020
Desk-based jobs may offer protection against poor cognition in later life
Desk-based jobs may offer protection against poor cognition in later life
People who work in jobs that require less physical activity - typically office and desk-based jobs - are at a lower risk of subsequent poor cognition than those whose work is more physically active, suggests new research from the University of Cambridge.

Health - Social Sciences - 03.07.2020
Levels of depression and anxiety higher amongst those from BAME backgrounds during lockdown
People from BAME backgrounds have had higher levels of depression and anxiety throughout the Covid-19 lockdown, as well as lower levels of happiness and life satisfaction, finds UCL's Covid-19 Social Study. In addition, whilst 21% of people from white backgrounds have reported being often lonely during lockdown, this figure has been 23% amongst those from BAME backgrounds.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 02.07.2020
Greater support needed for carers of autistic children during lockdown
Families of autistic children have been greatly impacted by lockdown reveals a study by UCL, the University of East London and the University of Bedfordshire. It found that despite the relaxed legislation on lockdown measures for autistic people brought into effect in April, 86% of those surveyed still felt that the needs of autistic people and their families were not adequately planned for or addressed by officials during the pandemic.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 02.07.2020
Examines Recursive Thinking
CMU team finds links between humans and non-human primates Recursion - the computational capacity to embed elements within elements of the same kind - has been lauded as the intellectual cornerstone of language, tool use and mathematics. A multi-institutional team of Carnegie Mellon University researchers, for the first time, show this ability is shared across age, species and cultural groups in a new study published in the June 26 issue of the journal Science Advances.

Social Sciences - 01.07.2020
Infant sleep problems can signal mental disorders in adolescents - study
Specific sleep problems among babies and very young children can be linked to mental disorders in adolescents, a new study has found. A team at the University of Birmingham's School of Psychology studied questionnaire data from the Children of the 90s , a UK-based longitudinal study which recruited pregnant mothers of 14,000 babies when it was set up almost three decades ago.

Social Sciences - Health - 01.07.2020
Researchers to investigate social contact and physical distancing behaviours during COVID-19
Understanding these contact patterns, and how people physically distance from each other in different settings and among different groups, will help policy makers design effective control strategies for preventing transmission. The CON-QUEST (COroNavirus QUESTionnaire) study, funded by the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute and supported by the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Behavioural Science and Evaluation , will initially focus on contacts between University staff and students to understand how coronavirus spreads in a university setting.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 30.06.2020
From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Scientists have tracked the eye movements of children to show how they make the link - spontaneously and without instructions - between vocal emotion (happiness or anger) followed by a natural or virtual face. Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognise - spontaneously and without instructions - the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? A team of scientists from the University of Geneva and the Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences (CISA) has provided an initial response to this question.

Health - Social Sciences - 30.06.2020
More than 40% of COVID-19 infections had no symptoms
A study of COVID-19 in the quarantined Italian town of V, where most of the population was tested, reveals the importance of asymptomatic cases. The authors of the new research suggest asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic people are an important factor in the transmission of COVID-19. They also argue that widespread testing, isolating infected people, and a community lockdown effectively stopped the outbreak in its tracks.

Social Sciences - 30.06.2020
Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves
Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves
New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colours throughout their lives to avoid predators. Shield bugs are often bright, colourful insects that use colours to warn of their distastefulness to predators.

Social Sciences - 29.06.2020
Number of Australians facing housing stress doubles
The number of Australians who couldn't pay their rent or mortgage on time has more than doubled due to COVID-19, new data from The Australian National University (ANU) shows. The survey of more than 3,200 people shows the proportion of Australians not being able to meet their regular housing costs jumped from 6.9 per cent in April to 15.1 per cent in May.

Social Sciences - 29.06.2020
Number of Australians facing housig stress doubles
The number of Australians who couldn't pay their rent or mortgage on time has more than doubled due to COVID-19, new data from The Australian National University (ANU) shows. The survey of more than 3,200 people shows the proportion of Australians not being able to meet their regular housing costs jumped from 6.9 per cent in April to 15.1 per cent in May.

Social Sciences - 26.06.2020
Native Amazonians, Americans and monkeys show similar thinking patterns
Scientists tested Bolivia's indigenous Tsimane' people (bottom left), U.S. adults and children and macaque monkeys on their thinking patterns when arranging sequences. (Photo courtesy of Stephen Ferrigno) Humans and monkeys may not speak the same lingo, but our ways of thinking are a lot more similar than previously thought, according to new research from UC Berkeley, Harvard University and Carnegie Mellon University.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.06.2020
Third of people report enjoying lockdown
On balance a third of people in the UK have been enjoying the lockdown, while 46% have not been enjoying it and 21% have mixed feelings, finds UCL's Covid-19 Social Study. The research also shows that 17% of people have not been enjoying lockdown 'at all', whilst only 4% of people have been enjoying it 'very much'.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 25.06.2020
Dolphins Learn in Similar Ways to Great Apes
Dolphins Learn in Similar Ways to Great Apes
Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia were observed over 10 years and found to have cultural behavior that is similar to great apes.

Social Sciences - Economics / Business - 25.06.2020
'Poverty alleviation' and 'needy'' Why words can do more harm than good when offering help
’Poverty alleviation’ and ’needy’’ Why words can do more harm than good when offering help
Stanford psychologists suggest that aid programs can be more effective with messaging that conveys dignity and empowerment in culturally relevant ways and does not jeopardize donations. Non-profits often pull at donors' heartstrings by casting aid recipients as "poor," "needy" or "vulnerable." But new Stanford research shows how such demeaning language can undermine their goal to help others.
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