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Chemistry - Health - 20.05.2022
Mini-fuel cell generates electricity using the body’s sugar
Glucose energy source for medicinal implants and sensors Mini-fuel cell generates electricity using the body's sugar Glucose is the most important energy source in the human body. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) now want to use the body's sugar as an energy source for medicinal implants.

Health - Innovation - 20.05.2022
New Western innovation gels engineering with medicine
New Western innovation gels engineering with medicine
Western biomaterials expert Kibret Mequanint - in partnership with Malcolm Xing from University of Manitoba - has developed the first-ever hydrophobic (water-hating) fluid, which displaces body fluids surrounding an injury allowing for near-instantaneous gelling, sealing and healing of injured tissue.

Health - 20.05.2022
Omicron variant caused more excess deaths in Massachusetts than Delta
A new study by investigators at the Yale Center for Outcomes Research and Evaluation (CORE) and Harvard shows the Omicron variant of the COVID-19 virus caused more excess deaths in just eight weeks than the Delta variant caused in its entire 23-week outbreak. The study, published in JAMA, runs counter to the idea that Omicron has caused less harm.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.05.2022
New reporting guidelines developed to improve AI in healthcare settings
New reporting guidelines, jointly published and the BMJ by Oxford researchers, will ensure that early studies on using Artificial Intelligence (AI) to treat real patients will give researchers the information needed to develop AI systems safely and effectively. Artificial Intelligence in medicine has shown promising results in numerous simulation studies, but very few AI systems have yet been used in patient care.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.05.2022
New non-invasive method of risk assessment in liver disease
In a recent study, an interdisciplinary research team from MedUni Vienna showed that functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be used as a non-invasive method for predicting complications in chronic liver disease. The scientists combined a simple risk stratification system developed at MedUni Vienna - the functional liver imaging score (FLIS) - with splenic diameter.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.05.2022
Study tests link between common blood pressure pills and breast cancer
Curtin researchers will examine if the long-term use of a popular blood pressure medication increased the risk of breast cancer in almost 200,000 women as part of a new project supported by the Federal Government. The new research, awarded an NHMRC Clinical Trials and Cohort Studies Grant, will investigate the link between the long-term use of calcium channel blockers and the risk of breast cancer by examining three internationally renowned Australian and Dutch longitudinal cohorts using state-of-the-art analytical techniques, which have not been used in this area before.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.05.2022
New method revolutionizes cancer diagnosis
"Deep Visual Proteomics" technology provides cell-specific, protein-based information and helps to analyze cancer diseases How does cancer arise? How does cellular composition influence tumor malignancy? These questions are profound and challenging to answer, but are crucial to understand the disease and find the right cure.

Health - 19.05.2022
Dolphins Line Up to Self-Medicate Skin Ailments at Coral ’Clinics’
If a human comes down with a rash, they might go to the doctor and come away with some ointment to put on it. Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins get skin conditions, too, but they come about their medication by queuing up nose-to-tail to rub themselves against corals. In the journal iScience on 19 May, researchers show that these corals have medicinal properties, suggesting that the dolphins are using the marine invertebrates to medicate skin conditions.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.05.2022
Antibiotics given shortly before caesarean birth not linked to asthma and eczema in young children
Antibiotics given to women before a caesarean birth have no effect on the risk of early childhood conditions, such as asthma or eczema, suggests a study by researchers at the Universities of Warwick and Birmingham. The research, published today (18 May 2022) in The BMJ, and funded by the National Institute for Health and Care Research, provides further evidence to support recommendations made by the National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE).

Health - Economics / Business - 18.05.2022
New agreement uses big data to improve WA health care
The Curtin Centre for Data Linkage has developed a new and innovative way of connecting data across general practices, hospitals, registries and government departments, which significantly reduces privacy risks. The increased level of security is because the linkage techniques operate on encrypted data, which means there is no requirement for the release of information that could potentially identify an individual.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022
On the trail of urinary tract infections
On the trail of urinary tract infections
05/18/2022 The German government is providing about 2.4 million Euros for a new research group in infectious diseases at JMU Würzburg. Dr. Carmen Aguilar will use this grant to search for new therapeutic approaches against one of the most common and recurrent bacterial infections. About every second woman gets a urinary tract infection once in her life, the cause for which is most often the uropathogenic bacterium Escherichia coli (UPEC).

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022
Viral infections during pregnancy affect maternal care behaviour
Viral infections during pregnancy affect the mother's brain and her postpartum care behaviour. These are the findings of a research study in a mouse model conducted at MedUni Vienna. The results were published in the leading journal "Molecular Psychiatry". There is ample data from studies in mouse models demonstrating that viral infections during pregnancy can affect the developing brain of the young in utero (in the womb) with lifelong consequences for brain function and behaviour.

Environment - Health - 18.05.2022
Smartphone addiction and the secrets of killer whale diets
Smartphone addiction and the secrets of killer whale diets
Environment Lower-income populations will be hardest hit by heat waves Unlocking the secrets of killer whale diets and their role in climate change Unlocking the secrets of killer whale diets and their role in climate change Killer whale populations are invading the Arctic, causing significant disruptions to an ecosystem already deeply affected by climate change.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.05.2022
Significant gains from computer-based depression treatment
Computer-based cognitive behavioral therapy was found to be significantly effective in treating depression in adults. (Andrea Piacquadio/Pexels) A new international collaborative study, involving multiple institutions including Western University, has found computer-based cognitive behavioural therapy (CCBT) has significantly greater impact in treating depression among adults than treatment as usual (TAU).

Health - Life Sciences - 18.05.2022
Levelling up UK rare disease research
Levelling up UK rare disease research
The UK needs new approaches to developing treatments for rare diseases, according to a new report led by UCL researchers describing how universities, the pharmaceutical industry and the NHS could improve life sciences collaborations. The report authors are calling for an independent British Office for Rare Diseases, comparable to the Office of Rare Disease Research in the US.

Environment - Health - 18.05.2022
Erratic temperatures causing more deaths than heatwaves: study
A new study has attributed 1.75 million deaths per year to fluctuating temperatures. It is the first to quantify the number of deaths associated with unstable temperatures. It found temperature variability had similar impacts to air pollution on global mortality. Deaths as a result of temperature variability accounted for 3.4% of all deaths globally between 2000 and 2019.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 18.05.2022
Kidney cells pump blood
Kidney cells pump blood
Study reveals that kidney cells don't filter blood, they pump it The finding could help detect and treat kidney diseases and aid in disease modeling Human kidneys are an intricate network of tubes that process roughly 190 quarts of blood every day. Lining these tubes are epithelial cells that transport blood through the kidneys and circulate it back into the body.

Health - Pharmacology - 18.05.2022
New research may explain unexpected effects of common painkillers
New research may explain unexpected effects of common painkillers
Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen and aspirin are widely used to treat pain and inflammation. But even at similar doses, different NSAIDs can have unexpected and unexplained effects on many diseases, including heart disease and cancer. Now, a new Yale-led study has uncovered a previously unknown process by which some NSAIDs affect the body.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Phage Therapy: A Model to Predict Its Efficacy against Pathogenic Bacteria
Phage Therapy: A Model to Predict Its Efficacy against Pathogenic Bacteria
Antibiotic resistance represents a major public health challenge, associated with a high mortality rate. While bacteriophages - viruses that kill bacteria - could be a solution for fighting antibiotic-resistant pathogens, various obstacles stand in the way of their clinical development.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.05.2022
Treatment for commonest form of blindness moves a step closer
Treatment for commonest form of blindness moves a step closer
Scientists at The University of Manchester have taken an important step towards finding a treatment for age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the most common form of adult blindness in the developed world. Publishing in the top journal PNAS and funded by the Macular Society, the researchers were able to identify early signs of the disease which could be targeted by new treatments before symptoms develop.
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