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Life Sciences - 29.12.2022
New study on the circadian clock of the fruit fly
Regulating the sleep-wake cycle: researchers demonstrate the importance of transporting a "clock protein" from the cell nucleus for temperature compensation The higher the temperatures, the faster physiological processes are. But there is an exception - the so-called circadian clock, which regulates the sleep-wake cycle in organisms.

Life Sciences - 23.12.2022
How to turn a tentacle into a foot
How to turn a tentacle into a foot
By identifying a key regulator of cell identity, a team from the University of Geneva and the FMI has succeeded in modifying the structure and function of tentacle cells in hydra. Humans, animals, plants: all multicellular organisms are made up of specialized cells called differentiated cells. Thus, the cells that make up the epidermis do not have the same identity - nor the same function - as those that line the digestive system, for example.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.12.2022
Cellular reprogramming can generate neural networks that reproduce unique characteristics of human cells
Cellular reprogramming can generate neural networks that reproduce unique characteristics of human cells
Studies on diseases that affect the human brain are usually based on animal models which cannot reproduce the complexity of human neuropathies. Therefore, these methodologies often fail when applied in a clinical environment with patients. In this context, the findings of the cellular reprogramming techniques to generate cultures of human neurons using skin cells have revolutionised the study and development of innovative therapies in neurosciences.

Life Sciences - Physics - 22.12.2022
New sensor uses MRI to detect light deep in the brain
Using this approach, researchers can map how light spreads in opaque environments. Using a specialized MRI sensor, MIT researchers have shown that they can detect light deep within tissues such as the brain. Imaging light in deep tissues is extremely difficult because as light travels into tissue, much of it is either absorbed or scattered.

Life Sciences - Innovation - 22.12.2022
New tool can assist with identifying carbohydrate-binding proteins
Groundbreaking research can help alleviate the challenges affiliated with studying carbohydrates. One of the major obstacles that those conducting research on carbohydrates are constantly working to overcome is the limited array of tools available to decipher the role of sugars. As a workaround, most researchers utilize lectins (sugar-binding proteins) isolated from plants or fungi, but they are large, with weak binding, and they are limited in their specificity and in the scope of sugars that they detect.

Life Sciences - Environment - 22.12.2022
New activity trackers for dolphin conservation
Experiments with custom-made biologging devices offer new insight into dolphin swimming and energy requirements Study: Tag-based estimates of bottlenose dolphin swimming behavior and energetics. (DOI: 10.1242/jeb. Just like a smartwatch can tell its wearer how many calories they consume during exercise, data from dolphin wearables can now be used to estimate how much energy dolphins use when they swim.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 21.12.2022
Bacteria taught to 'read' Morse code signals
Bacteria taught to ’read’ Morse code signals
A project of the Institute for Integrative Systems Biology (I2SysBio, UV-CSIC) researches genetically modified bacteria so that they learn to decode a message.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2022
The forgotten half of the brain to recover memory
The forgotten half of the brain to recover memory
A research team at the University of Lausanne has succeeded in preserving the memory of Alzheimer's mice by boosting the metabolic functions of glial cells rather than neurons, a striking shift in treatment strategies. The results can be found in the journal "Glia". Alzheimer's disease progressively affects the memory until the loss of autonomy of individuals.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.12.2022
Sharpsnout seabream's mortality during early life stages has a genetic base
Sharpsnout seabream’s mortality during early life stages has a genetic base
The high mortality in the early stages of life is a common phenomenon in fish and other species, but it is little studied due to its complexity. A study by the University of Barcelona and the Centre for Advanced Studies of Blanes (CEAB-CSIC) has analysed whether this mortality in the sharpsnout seabream ( Diplodus puntazzo ), a species of the Mediterranean with an important commercial interest, occurs by chance or whether it is genetically determined.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2022
A team of researchers, led by the UPF, characterize rare, damaged cells (senescent cells) that block the functions of their neighbour healthy cells and identify ways to neutralize them and improve tissue regeneration
Senescent cells, which emerge after tissue injury, create an aged-like inflamed microenvironment that is negative for stem cell function and tissue repair. The finding provides a basis for mitigating the loss of muscle regenerative capacity in elderly people and for improving muscle repair in young healthy people.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 21.12.2022
'A lot of work was invested before I was able to control these reactions'
’A lot of work was invested before I was able to control these reactions’
Dr Charlotte Teschers has developed an automated method for producing -glycomimetics- One project, one researcher and five years of intensive work: as part of her doctoral thesis, supervised by Prof. Ryan Gilmour at the Institute of Organic Chemistry, Dr. Charlotte Teschers has successfully developed a new method of producing complex, fluorinated sugars.

Life Sciences - 21.12.2022
Tracking down the origin of complex living things
Tracking down the origin of complex living things
Researchers at the University of Vienna and ETH Zurich cultivate "missing link" microorganism How did the complex living things on earth come into being? This is one of the great unanswered questions in biology. A collaboration between the research groups of Christa Schleper at the University of Vienna and Martin Pilhofer at ETH Zurich has brought the answer one step closer.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.12.2022
How nerve and vascular cells coordinate their growth
How nerve and vascular cells coordinate their growth
Study by the Universities of Bonn and Heidelberg provides insights into a carefully choreographed dance Nerve cells need a lot of energy and oxygen. They receive both through the blood. This is why nerve tissue is usually crisscrossed by a large number of blood vessels. But what prevents neurons and vascular cells from getting in each other's way as they grow? Researchers at the Universities of Heidelberg and Bonn, together with international partners, have identified a mechanism that takes care of this.

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 21.12.2022
This is your brain. This is your brain on code
MIT researchers are discovering which parts of the brain are engaged when a person evaluates a computer program. Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), which measures changes in blood flow throughout the brain, has been used over the past couple of decades for a variety of applications, including "functional anatomy" - a way of determining which brain areas are switched on when a person carries out a particular task.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2022
Cannabis use in adolescents linked with anxiety, memory loss 
Cannabis use in adolescents linked with anxiety, memory loss 
Research finds chronic adolescent cannabis exposure may harm emotional and cognitive brain development through impact on separate brain regions   Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry researchers have shown that chronic exposure during adolescence to tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive component of cannabis, may induce long-lasting memory impairments and increased anxiety levels.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.12.2022
Found: a protective probiotic for ALS
Scientists at the CRCHUM find that a bacterium called Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus HA-114 prevents neurodegeneration in the C. elegans worm used to study amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. CONTENU - A probiotic bacterium called Lacticaseibacillus rhamnosus HA-114 prevents neurodegeneration in the C. elegans worm , an animal model used to study amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 20.12.2022
What the inner ear of Europasaurus reveals about its life
What the inner ear of Europasaurus reveals about its life
A long-necked dinosaur from northern Germany was a so-called nest fledger Europasaurus was a long-necked, herbivorous dinosaur on four legs. The dinosaur lived in the late Jurassic period about 154 million years ago on a small island in what is now northern Germany. Researchers from the Universities of Vienna and Greifswald have now examined fossil skull remains of Europasaurus using computer tomography.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.12.2022
Polarity proteins shape efficient 'breathing' pores in grasses
Polarity proteins shape efficient ’breathing’ pores in grasses
A research group at the University of Bern is studying how plants "breathe". They have gained new insights into how grasses develop efficient "breathing pores" on their leaves. If important landmark components in this development process are missing, the gas exchange between plant and atmosphere is impaired.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2022
Biology medicine and health: a review of our top stories
2022 was another bumper year for news from the Faculty of Biology, Medicine and health. Here are some of our highlights: January we showed how early data for multivariant COVID-19 vaccine booster shows promise. The first results of an early trial of a multivariant COVID-19 vaccine booster, launched in Manchester in September 2021, showed it is driving a comprehensive immune response.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.12.2022
New gene mutation discovered in children in obesity research
New gene mutation discovered in children in obesity research
A research team at the University of Leipzig Medical School has discovered a new mechanism associated with severe childhood obesity. A genetic alteration leads to an unusual expression of a gene related to the control of the feeling of hunger. Until now, this alteration has not been detected with general genetic diagnostics in obesity.
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