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Linguistics / Literature - 05.05.2022
Significant Decrease in Willingness to Donate Blood During Corona Pandemic
Significant Decrease in Willingness to Donate Blood During Corona Pandemic
Current calls for blood donations highlight the urgent need for blood. A new study at Universität Hamburg shows that the willingness to donate blood has dramatically decreased throughout the pandemic. The findings were published in the journal PLOS ONE. Even before the corona pandemic, there were repeated blood drives to meet urgent needs.

Linguistics / Literature - 05.05.2022
How our brain influences language change
How our brain influences language change
Changes of speech sounds during the Middle Ages shed light on how we process language Our language is changing constantly. Researchers of the University of Vienna found that, over centuries, frequently occurring speech sound patterns get even more frequent. The reason for this development is that our brain can perceive, process and learn frequent, and thus prototypical sound patterns more easily than less frequent ones.

Campus - Linguistics / Literature - 14.02.2022
Virgil has the edge on Shakespeare in helping students to love literature
Virgil has the edge on Shakespeare in helping students to love literature
Students who study Virgil's Aeneid at school find it significantly more engaging than other 'high-prestige' literature, even though they only learn tiny fragments of the text, research suggests. Ultimately, if this is high-level poetry that students actually like, perhaps we ought to be finding ways to give them the chance to do it Frances Foster The finding comes from a limited study with three groups of 15 and 16-year-old state school students taking Latin GCSE, and raises the possibility that there may be a case for expanding ancient literature's use in the wider curriculum.

Linguistics / Literature - 20.01.2022
'Rough' words feature a trill sound in languages around the globe - study
’Rough’ words feature a trill sound in languages around the globe - study
In languages spoken around the world, words describing rough surfaces are highly likely to feature a 'trilled /r/' sound - a linguistic pattern that stretches back over 6,000 years, a new study reveals. Language scientists first analysed words for 'rough' and 'smooth' in a worldwide sample of 332 spoken languages - discovering a strong link between the sounds of speech and the sense of touch, which has influenced the structure of modern languages.