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Social Sciences - 29.09.2022
Exposure to accents helps children learn words
University of Freiburg study on vocabulary acquisition uses novel game-based design Freiburg, Sep 29, 2022 If elementary school children are accustomed to many regional and foreign accents because they hear them frequently in their linguistic environment, then it is easier for them to learn new words from other children who speak with unfamiliar accents.

Social Sciences - 27.09.2022
New insights on teen vaping behaviour in Australia
A new study tracking Australian teenager beliefs and behaviours using vapes (e-cigarettes) has found many are readily accessing and using illegal vaping products, writes A/Prof Becky Freeman, Dr Christina Watts and Sam Egger. Teen vaping has been in the news, with reports of  rapidly increasing use  and  illegal sales  of e-cigarettes.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 26.09.2022
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Bringing up baby, 10,000 years ago
Further finds from an infant burial in Italy provides insights on the use of baby carriers and family heirlooms in prehistory, an UdeM-led study reveals. CONTENU - It seems logical enough: even in their earliest history, humans must have needed something to carry their babies around in as they moved from place to place.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 22.09.2022
People of early medieval England had mostly north-western European heritage
People of early medieval England had mostly north-western European heritage
A genetic and archaeological study involving a UCL researcher has revealed the great extent of migration from continental Europe into the East of England during the early Middle Ages. In the largest early medieval ancient DNA study to date, an interdisciplinary team consisting of geneticists and archaeologists, led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Germany, analysed over 400 individuals from ancient Britain, Ireland, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.09.2022
Dementia rates over 20% higher among black adults than UK average
Dementia rates are 22% higher among black people in the UK compared to white people, while black and South Asian dementia patients die younger, and sooner after diagnosis, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The authors of the study, published in Alzheimer's & Dementia , say their findings demonstrate a need for more targeted interventions to reduce dementia risks and improve treatment outcomes in ethnic minority communities.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 21.09.2022
From Continental Europe to England
From Continental Europe to England
Archaeogenetic study reveals large-scale continental migration into the East of England during the early Medieval Period In the largest early-medieval population study to date, an interdisciplinary team consisting of geneticists and archaeologists - led by the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology and the University of Central Lancashire - analysed over 400 individuals from ancient Britain, Ireland, Germany, Denmark and the Netherlands.

Health - Social Sciences - 21.09.2022
Nightmares in middle age linked to dementia risk
People who experience frequent bad dreams in middle age are more likely to be diagnosed with dementia later in life, according to new research. A new study , published in The Lancet journal, eClinicalMedicine by researchers at the University of Birmingham, suggests nightmares may become prevalent several years or even decades before the characteristic memory and thinking problems of dementia set in.

Social Sciences - 21.09.2022
When school feels 'like prison,' test scores, college attendance drop
When school feels ’like prison,’ test scores, college attendance drop
Students in high surveillance schools who get punished often can feel "less like students and more like suspects," says Hopkins professor Odis Johnson Students at high schools with prominent security measures have lower math scores, are less likely to attend college, and are suspended more compared to students in schools with less surveillance, finds a new Johns Hopkins University study.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.09.2022
Calculate your neighborhood’s ’cognability’
A new tool, an interactive map developed by University of Michigan researchers, allows you to plug in your address and assess how your neighborhood could support healthy cognitive aging under a theory U-M scientist Jessica Finlay and colleagues developed, called "cognability. The theory suggests that an older adult's access to civic and social organizations, cultural centers such as museums and art galleries, and recreation centers may help protect against cognitive decline as a person ages.

Social Sciences - Career - 15.09.2022
The power of weak ties in gaining new employment
The power of weak ties in gaining new employment
An experiment using data from 20 million LinkedIn profiles shows how much we rely on people we know less well to land new jobs. If you have a LinkedIn account, your connections probably consist of a core group of people you know well, and a larger set of people you know less well. The latter are what experts call -weak ties.

Social Sciences - History / Archeology - 15.09.2022
Beads show European trade in African interior used Indigenous routes
Beads show European trade in African interior used Indigenous routes
Tiny glass beads discovered in mountain caves about 25 miles from the shores of Lake Malawi in eastern-central Africa provide evidence that European trade in the continent's hinterland was built on Indigenous trade routes from the coast to the interior that had existed for centuries, according to a study co-authored by Yale anthropologist Jessica Thompson.

History / Archeology - Social Sciences - 15.09.2022
Beads from African interior reveal traces of European exploitation
Beads from African interior reveal traces of European exploitation
Tiny glass beads discovered in mountain caves about 25 miles from the shores of Lake Malawi in eastern-central Africa provide evidence that European trade in the continent's hinterland was built on Indigenous trade routes from the coast to the interior that had existed for centuries, according to a study co-authored by Yale anthropologist Jessica Thompson.

Social Sciences - 12.09.2022
Money can increase willingness to help - but only if empathy is low
People who help others do not necessarily want to be rewarded for this. However, a reward can motivate low-empathic individuals to provide help. This is shown by a new study. A classic finding of social psychology research is that people donate less blood if they are paid to do so. If there is no payment, which means that they act simply out of a desire to help their fellow human beings, they give significantly more blood.

Environment - Social Sciences - 12.09.2022
Battle of the bins
Battle of the bins
In Australia, cockatoos and humans are in an arms race over garbage access Residents of southern Sydney, Australia have been in a long-term battle over garbage - humans want to throw it out, and cockatoos want to eat it. The sulphur-crested cockatoos that call the area home have a knack for getting into garbage bins, and people have been using inventive devices to keep them out.

Social Sciences - 09.09.2022
Who flirts to get ahead at work? Usually men in subordinate roles
The stereotype of the female secretary who hikes up her skirt to get a promotion is as pervasive as the powerful male boss who makes passes at his underlings. But a new study upends both tropes with evidence that it's actually men in subordinate positions who are most likely to flirt, use sexual innuendo, and even harass female bosses as a way to demonstrate their masculinity and power for personal gain at work.

Social Sciences - 08.09.2022
Inadequate post-release support drives up reincarceration rates: study
New research shows that people released from prison who sought help for their mental health or substance use problems were more likely to end up back in prison, prompting calls for an overhaul of the system to allow quicker and more consistent support. The study, published in the Journal PLOS ONE, examined the link between contact with mental health and substance use treatment services and reincarceration rates among 1,115 adults released from prisons in Queensland, Australia.

Social Sciences - 07.09.2022
Research into our relationship with social media is flawed
Research into our relationship with social media is flawed
Social media platforms such as TikTok, Instagram and Twitter encourage their users to scroll endlessly through content. But this doesn't automatically imply that there is evidence of 'doom scrolling', in which the user's endless scrolling has a negative effect on their well-being. That's what Nastasia Griffioen argues, who has conducted research into smartphone use among young people; she will receive her PhD from Radboud University on 12 September.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.09.2022
Starting kindergarten: Normal stress for the vast majority of children
Starting kindergarten: Normal stress for the vast majority of children
Measures of morning salivary cortisol show that children experience stress when starting kindergarten. It's normal. The transition to kindergarten causes a generalized and normal increase in the stress hormone cortisol in children during the first two weeks of school. Cortisol levels then decrease in some children but not others.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 06.09.2022
What attitudes towards outgroups improves
A realistic assessment of our own social group can help improve our attitude towards other groups. This is shown by a new study by the University Hospital of Würzburg. We are us, and others are exactly that - other. The feeling of belonging to a particular group that is clearly different from other groups is probably a human trait that we all share.

Social Sciences - Health - 05.09.2022
'Children younger than six years old do not belong in bunk beds'
’Children younger than six years old do not belong in bunk beds’
Study by Leipzig University Medical Center: Forearm fractures most common after falls from bunk beds They are in vogue with many families: bunk beds in all shapes and colors, with stairs, ladders or even slides. A study by Leipzig University Medical Center has shown that accidents involving such beds frequently lead to bone fractures in children.
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