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Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.11.2018
Preventing type 2 diabetes in Malawi
Researchers at the University of Glasgow are collaborating with Malawian scientists to try to find out why some people in Malawi develop type 2 diabetes - even though many are slim and highly active. Worldwide, diabetes is on the rise with almost 400 million people living with the disease - a figure that is predicted to rise to about 600 million in 2035.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 08.11.2018
Researchers and partners work with sushi restaurants to reduce seafood fraud
A new monitoring project involving UCLA researchers and partners aims to take “fake sushi” off Los Angeles diners' plates. The Los Angeles Seafood Monitoring Project team — which includes university researchers, students, sushi restaurants and government regulators — is working to reduce sushi fraud and the mislabeling of fish.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 06.11.2018
Tax on meat could offset health costs
Introducing a health tax on red and processed meat could prevent more than 220,000 deaths and save over US$40 billion in healthcare costs every year, new Oxford University research suggests. Published today in the journal PLoS One , the study conducted by the Oxford Martin School and the Nuffield Department of Population Health focused on optimal levels of taxation for red and processed meat in 149 world regions, to account for the cost burden on healthcare systems and spur changes in consumption patterns.

Agronomy / Food Science - 30.10.2018
Divona - Agroscope's New Disease-Resistant White Grape Variety
Divona - Agroscope’s New Disease-Resistant White Grape Variety
Bern, 30.10.2018 - Agroscope, the Swiss federal centre of excellence for agricultural research, is launching the first multiresistant white grape variety, Divona. The fruit of twenty years of research, Divona is resistant to fungal diseases, and well-suited for the production of high-quality wines - two characteristics that make it a popular variety for viticulture and winemaking.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.10.2018
Even with health insurance, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults are more likely to delay medical care
Even with health insurance, lesbian, gay and bisexual adults are more likely to delay medical care
UCLA study analyzes rates of insurance coverage in California, access to health care and healthy behaviors Venetia Lai Lesbian, gay and bisexual adults in California have rates of health insurance coverage on par with or better than that of straight men and women in the state, but they are more likely to wait to see the doctor when they need medical care, according to a new policy brief by the UCLA Center for Health Policy Research.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 03.10.2018
Tracing Prehistoric Diets
International Research Team including Scientists at Freie Universität Berlin Analyzes Protein Residues in 8000-year-old Ceramic Vessels No 257/2018 from Oct 03, 2018 Through an analysis of ceramic vessels, an international research team has gained insights into the dietary habits of inhabitants of a prehistoric settlement.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 27.09.2018
Total diet replacement programmes are effective for treating obesity
Replacing food with a diet of soups, shakes and bars starting at 810 calories per day alongside regular sessions with a counsellor is a safe and clinically effective way to treat obesity in primary care, finds a study from Oxford University researchers. Total diet replacement programmes are not generally funded by the NHS in England but the authors of this study, published in the BMJ , suggest that there is now enough evidence for these programmes to be one of the treatments recommended for people who are obese.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 18.09.2018
’High-yield’ farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the "least bad" option for feeding the world while saving its species - provided use of such "land-efficient" systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland. Agriculture that appears to be more eco-friendly but uses more land may actually have greater environmental costs per unit of food than "high-yield" farming that uses less land, a new study has found.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.09.2018
'High-yield' farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New research involving dairy experts at the University of Nottingham suggests that more intensive agriculture might be the ‘least bad' option for feeding the world, while saving its species - provided use of such “land-efficient” systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 14.09.2018
’High-yield’ farming costs the environment less than previously thought - and could help spare habitats
New findings suggest that more intensive agriculture might be the "least bad" option for feeding the world while saving its species - provided use of such "land-efficient" systems prevents further conversion of wilderness to farmland. Our results suggest that high-yield farming could be harnessed to meet the growing demand for food without destroying more of the natural world Andrew Balmford Agriculture that appears to be more eco-friendly but uses more land may actually have greater environmental costs per unit of food than "high-yield" farming that uses less land, a new study has found.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 12.09.2018
Did crafting beer lead to cereal cultivation?
Stanford researchers have found the oldest archaeological evidence of beer brewing, a discovery that supports the hypothesis that in some regions, beer may have been an underlying motivation to cultivate cereals. Standing in the entrance to Raqefet Cave, where they found evidence for the oldest man-made alcohol in the world, are, from left, Dani Nadel, Li Liu, Jiajing Wang and Hao Zhao.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 29.08.2018
Improving soil quality can slow global warming
Improving soil quality can slow global warming
Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to print (Opens in new window) Low-tech ways of improving soil quality on farms and rangelands worldwide could pull significant amounts of carbon out of the atmosphere and slow the pace of climate change, according to a new UC  Berkeley study.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 29.08.2018
Food activates brown fat
Brown fat consumes energy, which is the reason why it could be important for preventing obesity and diabetes. Working together with an international team, researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) were able to demonstrate that food also increases the thermogenesis of brown fat, and not just cold as previously assumed.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.08.2018
New perspectives to improve wheat: the reference sequence of wheat genome is finally a reality
New perspectives to improve wheat: the reference sequence of wheat genome is finally a reality
The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC), of which INRA is a leading member, published the first wheat genome reference sequence in Science , on 17 August 2018. French research teams from INRA, CEA, and the universities of Clermont-Auvergne, Evry, Paris-Sud and Paris-Saclay contributed to the project, a scientific milestone due to the enormous complexity and size of the genome - five times larger than the human genome and forty times larger than the rice genome.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 16.08.2018
The Wheat Genome Is Five Times Bigger than the Human Genome
The Wheat Genome Is Five Times Bigger than the Human Genome
Scientists have been able to sequence the complete genome of common wheat for the first time. The information will enable more effective measures to be taken to combat pests and climate stress in wheat. Wheat is the one of the most widely cultivated crops in the world and one of the most common type of grain.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 09.08.2018
Lab ’failure’ leads to potential treatment for obesity
Yale scientists set out to create a morbidly obese mouse. They failed miserably. What they found was much more interesting. " We created a mouse that eats fat but doesn't get fat," said Anne Eichmann , Ensign Professor of Medicine (Cardiology) and Professor of Cellular And Molecular Physiology. The "failure" led Eichmann's team headed by Associate Research Scientist Feng Zhang to discover that the absence of two molecules helped "zip up" specialized  vessels in lymphatic tissue and prevent the uptake of fat particles called chylomicrons, they report Aug.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 07.08.2018
Corn that acquires its own nitrogen identified, reducing need for fertilizer
The dripping gel from this corn plant harbors bacteria that convert atmospheric nitrogen into a form usable by the plant. Photo: Howard-Yana Shapiro A public-private collaboration of researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison, the University of California, Davis, and Mars Inc., have identified varieties of tropical corn from Oaxaca, Mexico, that can acquire a significant amount of the nitrogen they need from the air by cooperating with bacteria.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 25.07.2018
Heart disease and cancer kill more people in developing nations
Diseases such as cancer, heart disease and stroke are deadlier in the developing world than in rich nations. This is the finding of a new analysis from researchers at Imperial College London. The paper revealed that death rates in low and middle income tropical countries from so-called non-communicable diseases (NCDs), are higher than from NCDs in Western countries.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 25.07.2018
Why we need more rigorous nutrition research
Stanford's John Ioannidis recently discussed why the design of most nutrition studies impedes progress in the field and suggested a new kind of approach. Pervasive and compelling though it may be, research on nutritional health frequently yields less-than-dependable results. This, at least, is the opinion of John Ioannidis , MD, DSc, professor of medicine and of health research and policy at the School of Medicine.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 25.07.2018
CMU’s Lowry Weighs in On Future of Agriculture
A new National Academies report identifies research opportunities to transform U.S. food production by 2030 The National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and Medicine has released a new blueprint for how research can transform the fields of agriculture and food production.
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