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Astronomy / Space Science - 10.05.2021
At the forefront of space research
At the forefront of space research
We're at the forefront of research that is furthering our understanding of the universe and the exploration of space. Durham's research spans from black holes to dark matter, planet formation to galaxy evolution and the Cosmic Web that binds the universe together. We also work on building some the biggest and best new telescopes.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 06.05.2021
Supernovae Twins Open Up New Possibilities for Precision Cosmology
Supernovae Twins Open Up New Possibilities for Precision Cosmology
By Bob Cahn Cosmologists have found a way to double the accuracy of measuring distances to supernova explosions - one of their tried-and-true tools for studying the mysterious dark energy that is making the universe expand faster and faster. The results from the Nearby Supernova Factory (SNfactory) collaboration, led by Greg Aldering of the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), will enable scientists to study dark energy with greatly improved precision and accuracy, and provide a powerful crosscheck of the technique across vast distances and time.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 05.05.2021
FASER is born: new experiment will study particles that interact with dark matter
FASER is born: new experiment will study particles that interact with dark matter
The newest experiment at CERN, the European Organization for Nuclear Research, is now in place at the Large Hadron Collider in Geneva. FASER , or F orw a rd S earch E xpe r iment, was approved by CERN's research board in March 2019. Now installed in the LHC tunnel, this experiment, which seeks to understand particles that scientists believe may interact with dark matter, is undergoing tests before data collection commences next year.

Astronomy / Space Science - 03.05.2021
6000 hours of research to hear gravitational waves
6000 hours of research to hear gravitational waves
Remember the days before working from home? It's Monday morning, you're running late to beat the traffic, and you can't find your car keys. What do you do? You might try moving from room to room, casting your eye over every flat surface, in the hope of spotting the missing keys. Of course, this assumes they are somewhere in plain sight; if they're hidden under a newspaper, or fallen behind the sofa, you'll never spot them.

Astronomy / Space Science - 30.04.2021
’Campfires’ offer clue to solar heating mystery
Miniature solar flares nicknamed "campfires", recently discovered near the surface of the Sun, are about 1,000 to 5,000 km tall and between 1-1.5 million degrees hot, finds a new study co-authored by UCL researchers. The study compared data from Solar Orbiter, the Sun-observing mission by ESA and NASA, with observations from NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory to triangulate the height of the campfires.

Astronomy / Space Science - 29.04.2021
How long is a day on Venus’ Scientists crack mysteries of our closest neighbor
Venus is an enigma. It's the planet next door and yet reveals little about itself. An opaque blanket of clouds smothers a harsh landscape pelted by acid rain and baked at temperatures that can liquify lead. Now, new observations from the safety of Earth are lifting the veil on some of Venus' most basic properties.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 28.04.2021
Black hole-neutron star collisions may settle dispute over Universe’s expansion
Studying the violent collisions of black holes and neutron stars may soon provide a new measurement of the Universe's expansion rate, helping to resolve a long-standing dispute, suggests a new simulation study led by researchers at UCL. Our two current best ways of estimating the Universe's rate of expansion - measuring the brightness and speed of pulsating and exploding stars, and looking at fluctuations in radiation from the early Universe - give very different answers, suggesting our theory of the Universe may be wrong.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 25.04.2021
Icy clouds could have kept early Mars warm enough for rivers and lakes
Simulation led by UChicago geoscientist finds missing piece to Martian climate puzzle One of the great puzzles of modern space science is neatly summed up by the view from NASA's Perseverance, which just landed on Mars: Today it's a desert planet, and yet the rover is sitting right next to an ancient river delta.

Astronomy / Space Science - 23.04.2021
Black holes to dark matter – an evolving universe
Black holes to dark matter – an evolving universe
From supermassive black holes to the hunt for dark matter, Durham's scientists are at the forefront of investigations into the evolution of the universe. Our astronomers and cosmologists are world-leaders working with fellow researchers across the planet to further our understanding of the cosmos and our place in it.

Astronomy / Space Science - 23.04.2021
Scientists retrace asteroid's long one-way trip to Earth
Scientists retrace asteroid’s long one-way trip to Earth
An international team of scientists has reconstructed the 22-million-year journey of an asteroid through the Solar System to its impact on Earth.    The research on the flight path of the asteroid, which landed in the Kalahari Desert in Botswana on 2 June 2018, is the first time that scientists have precisely mapped a meteorite's voyage to Earth.   The breakthrough offers new insights into the Solar System's ancient past, including a better unde

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 20.04.2021
From extravagant to achievable - pushing the boundaries of research to find life beyond Earth
From extravagant to achievable - pushing the boundaries of research to find life beyond Earth
The University of Cambridge is creating a new research initiative, bringing together physicists, chemists, biologists, mathematicians, and earth scientists to answer fundamental questions on the origin and nature of life in the Universe.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.04.2021
Durham among first to use Hubble successor
Durham among first to use Hubble successor
Durham's astronomers are playing a key role in the biggest scientific programme to be carried out on the new successor to the Hubble Space Telescope. Our scientists will use NASA's James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) to hunt for dark matter and investigate early galaxy formation. The JWST is the largest, most powerful space telescope ever built and is scheduled for launch in October 2021 before beginning operations in 2022.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 19.04.2021
New Exoplanet discovered orbiting young Sun-like star
New Exoplanet discovered orbiting young Sun-like star
Astronomers from the Netherlands, Belgium, Chile, the USA and Germany have imaged the newly discovered exoplanet "YSES 2b" right next to its host star An international research team with the participation of Dr Markus Mugrauer from the Astrophysical Institute of Friedrich Schiller University Jena has succeeded in the direct imaging of a young exoplanet.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 15.04.2021
IceCube Neutrino Observatory Detects New High-Energy Particle
San Diego Supercomputer Center Among Resources Used to Prove 60-Year-Old Theory In December 2016, a high-energy particle called an electron antineutrino hurtled to Earth from outer space at close to the speed of light. Deep inside the ice sheet at the South Pole, it smashed into an electron and produced a particle, called W − boson, that quickly decayed into a shower of secondary particles.

Campus - Astronomy / Space Science - 15.04.2021
Fast radio bursts shown to include lower frequency radio waves than previously detected
Since fast radio bursts (FRBs) were first discovered over a decade ago, scientists have puzzled over what could be generating these intense flashes of radio waves from outside of our galaxy. In a gradual process of elimination, the field of possible explanations has narrowed as new pieces of information are gathered about FRBs - how long they last, the frequencies of the radio waves detected, and so on.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.04.2021
Telescopes unite in unprecedented observations of famous black hole
In April 2019, scientists released the first image of a black hole in the galaxy M87 using the Event Horizon Telescope (EHT). However, that remarkable achievement was just the beginning of the science story to be told. McGill University astronomers were part of this global effort. Data from 19 observatories are now being released that promise to give unparalleled insight into this black hole and the system it powers, and to improve tests of Einstein's General Theory of Relativity.

Physics - Astronomy / Space Science - 08.04.2021
Particle’s ’wobble’ hints at new physics
The "wobble", or rate of precession, of the muon particle in a magnetic field is different from what our best theoretical model of the subatomic world would predict, according to an experiment involving UCL researchers that strengthens evidence for new, unknown physics. The Muon g-2 experiment, carried out at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory in the United States, measured with unprecedented precision the rate at which the muon "wobbled" (precessed) as it circulated a 15-metre magnetic ring at nearly the speed of light.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 08.04.2021
More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust fall to Earth each year
More than 5,000 tons of extraterrestrial dust fall to Earth each year
Every year, our planet encounters dust from comets 1 and asteroid 2 . These interplanetary dust particles pass through our atmosphere and give rise to shooting stars. Some of them reach the ground in the form of micrometeorites. An international program 3 conducted for nearly 20 years by scientists from the CNRS, the Université Paris-Saclay and the National museum of natural history 4 with the support of the French polar institute, has determined that 5,200 tons per year of these micrometeorites reach the ground.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 07.04.2021
Dark Energy Survey physicists open new window into dark energy
For the first time, DES scientists can combine measurements of the distribution of matter, galaxies, and galaxy clusters to advance our understanding of dark energy. The universe is expanding at an ever-increasing rate, and while no one is sure why, researchers with the Dark Energy Survey (DES) at least had a strategy for figuring it out: They would combine measurements of the distribution of matter, galaxies and galaxy clusters to better understand what's going on.

Astronomy / Space Science - Computer Science - 07.04.2021
Seeing Quadruple
Machine-learning methods lead to discovery of rare "quadruply imaged quasars" that can help solve cosmological puzzles With the help of machine-learning techniques, a team of astronomers has discovered a dozen quasars that have been warped by a naturally occurring cosmic "lens" and split into four similar images.
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