« BACK

Earth Sciences



Results 1 - 20 of 1314.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 66 Next »


Earth Sciences - 22.02.2019
Copernicus Sentinel-1 reveals shared plumbing led to Agung awakening
Copernicus Sentinel-1 reveals shared plumbing led to Agung awakening
ESA > Our Activities > Observing the Earth > Copernicus > Sentinel-1 When Mount Agung in Indonesia erupted in 2017, the search was on to find out why it had stirred. Thanks to information on ground deformation from the Copernicus Sentinel-1 mission, scientists now have more insight into the volcano's hidden secrets that caused it to reawaken.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 22.02.2019
Diving into Earth's interior helps scientists unravel secrets of diamond formation
Diving into Earth’s interior helps scientists unravel secrets of diamond formation
Understanding the global carbon cycle provides scientists with vital clues about the planet's habitability. It's the reason why the Earth has a clement stable climate and a low carbon dioxide atmosphere compared to that of Venus, for instance, which is in a runaway greenhouse state with high surface temperatures and a thick carbon dioxide atmosphere.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 21.02.2019
Using AI to avert 'environmental catastrophe'
Using AI to avert ’environmental catastrophe’
A new Centre at the University of Cambridge will develop AI techniques to help address some of the biggest threats facing the planet.  These datasets represent a transformation in the way we can study and understand the Earth and environment, as we assess and find solutions to environmental risk Simon Redfern Funded by UK Research and Innovation (UKRI), the Centre for Doctoral Training in Application of Artificial Intelligence to the study of Environmental Risks (AI4ER) is one of 16 new Centres for Doctoral Training (CDTs) announced today.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 21.02.2019
Asteroid or volcanos' Apportioning blame for the dinosaur extinction
Asteroid or volcanos’ Apportioning blame for the dinosaur extinction
Based on new data published today in the journal Science , it seems increasingly likely that an asteroid or comet impact 66 million years ago reignited massive volcanic eruptions in India, half a world away from the impact site in the Caribbean Sea. But it leaves unclear to what degree the two catastrophes contributed to the near-simultaneous mass extinction that killed off the dinosaurs and many other forms of life.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 20.02.2019
A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
A Volcanic Binge And Its Frosty Hangover
A major volcanic event could have triggered one of the largest glaciations in Earth's history - the Gaskiers glaciation, which turned the Earth into a giant snowball approximately 580 million years ago. Researchers from Heidelberg University and colleagues from Mexico have discovered remnants of such a large igneous province that resulted from vast lava flows.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 18.02.2019
Rosetta's comet sculpted by stress
Rosetta’s comet sculpted by stress
Feeling stressed? You're not alone. ESA's Rosetta mission has revealed that geological stress arising from the shape of Comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko has been a key process in sculpting the comet's surface and interior following its formation. Small, icy comets with two distinct lobes seem to be commonplace in the Solar System, with one possible mode of formation a slow collision of two primordial objects in the early stages of formation some 4.5 billion years ago.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 18.02.2019
Climate change makes summer weather stormier yet more stagnant
Study finds rising temperatures feed more energy to thunderstorms, less to general circulation. Climate change is shifting the energy in the atmosphere that fuels summertime weather, which may lead to stronger thunderstorms and more stagnant conditions for midlatitude regions of the Northern Hemisphere, including North America, Europe, and Asia, a new MIT study finds.

Earth Sciences - 14.02.2019
Satellite images reveal interconnected plumbing system that caused Bali volcano to erupt
Satellite images reveal interconnected plumbing system that caused Bali volcano to erupt
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has used satellite technology provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) to uncover why the Agung volcano in Bali erupted in November 2017 after 50 years of dormancy. Their findings, published today , could have important implications for forecasting future eruptions in the area.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.02.2019
Ambitious research to help achieve UN Sustainable Development Goals
Scientists from across five countries, including those from University of Glasgow, will collaborate on ambitious research to gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between humans and their environment in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The University of Glasgow project “River basins as 'living laboratories' for achieving sustainable development goals across national and sub-national scales” has been funded through the new Natural Environment Research Council-TaSE (Towards a Sustainable Earth) research programme.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 11.02.2019
Indonesia's devastating 2018 earthquake was a rare 'supershear,' according to UCLA-led study
Indonesia’s devastating 2018 earthquake was a rare ’supershear,’ according to UCLA-led study
The devastating 7.5 magnitude earthquake that struck the Indonesian island of Sulawesi last September was a rare “supershear” earthquake, according to a study led by UCLA researchers. Only a dozen supershear quakes have been identified in the past two decades, according to Lingsen Meng, UCLA's Leon and Joanne V.C. Knopoff Professor of Physics and Geophysics and one of the report's senior authors.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 11.02.2019
Many Arctic lakes give off less carbon than expected
Many Arctic lakes give off less carbon than expected
The Arctic is warming twice as fast as the rest of the planet. One consequence of that trend is the thawing of permafrost, a layer of earth that has remained frozen for thousands of years in some areas. This frozen soil and vegetation currently holds more than twice the carbon found in the atmosphere.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 07.02.2019
Volcanic growth ’critical’ to the formation of Panama
It is a thin strip of land whose creation kick-started one of the most significant geological events in the past 60 million years. Yet for scientists the exact process by which the Isthmus of Panama came into being still remains largely contentious. In a new study published today in the journal Scientific Reports , scientists from Cardiff University have proposed that the Isthmus was born not solely from tectonic process, but could have also largely benefited from the growth of volcanoes.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 05.02.2019
Dark Fiber Lays Groundwork for Long-Distance Earthquake Detection and Groundwater Mapping
Dark Fiber Lays Groundwork for Long-Distance Earthquake Detection and Groundwater Mapping
Berkeley Lab researchers capture a detailed picture of how earthquakes travel through the Earth's subsurface In traditional seismology, researchers studying how the earth moves in the moments before, during, and after an earthquake rely on sensors that cost tens of thousands of dollars to make and install underground.

Earth Sciences - 31.01.2019
Monitoring gas dynamics in a deep geological repository
Monitoring gas dynamics in a deep geological repository
The Mont Terri Rock Laboratory, lying to the north of Saint-Ursanne in the canton of Jura, is located at a depth of around 300 metres underground. At this site, various long-term experiments are being carried out as part of efforts to develop an operating plan for the safe disposal of radioactive waste.

Earth Sciences - 28.01.2019
New method to determine how safe buildings are after an earthquake
New method to determine how safe buildings are after an earthquake
EPFL scientists have developed a new method for evaluating building safety after an earthquake, helping residents return to their homes more quickly. Deciding when it's safe for a building's residents to move back in after an earthquake is a major challenge and responsibility for civil engineers. Not only do they have to evaluate whether the building could collapse, but also whether it could withstand aftershocks of the same magnitude.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 23.01.2019
An equipment facility for natural hazards research
After a natural disaster, researchers often want to collect information about what happened so that they can improve infrastructure and community resilience in the future. A center housed at the University of Washington, which opened its doors Sept. 1, offers a new way for these scientists to get their hands on state-of-the-art equipment to study the effects of natural disasters.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 18.01.2019
Q&A: Designing a better local tsunami warning system
New research outlines a more accurate and consistent way to warn coastal residents when and where tsunami waves are likely to hit. On a Friday afternoon in the spring of 2011, the T'hoku-Oki earthquake shook northeastern Japan for six minutes and shifted the country's main island by 8 feet. Minutes later, residents began receiving tsunami warnings through broadcast media, mobile phones and sirens.

Earth Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 16.01.2019
Researchers are using a data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging
Researchers are using a data-driven approach to make earthquakes less damaging
Technologies like artificial intelligence, sensor networks and advances in mapping are driving the work Amy Akmal The 1994 Northridge earthquake was one of the costliest natural disasters in U.S. history. Fifty-seven people died, more than 8,700 were injured, and property damages amounted to billions of dollars.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.01.2019
For 35 years, the Pacific Ocean has largely spared West's mountain snow from effects of global warming
For 35 years, the Pacific Ocean has largely spared West’s mountain snow from effects of global warming
A new study has found that a pattern of ocean temperatures and atmospheric circulation has offset most of the impact of global warming on mountain snowpack in the western U.S. since the 1980s. The study from Oregon State University, the University of Washington and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory was published Jan.

History / Archeology - Earth Sciences - 16.01.2019
New insights into what Neolithic people ate in southeastern Europe
New insights into what Neolithic people ate in southeastern Europe
New research, led by the University of Bristol, has shed new light on the eating habits of Neolithic people living in southeastern Europe using food residues from pottery extracts dating back more than 8,000 years. With the dawn of the Neolithic age, farming became established across Europe and people turned their back on aquatic resources, a food source more typical of the earlier Mesolithic period, instead preferring to eat meat and dairy products from domesticated animals.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 66 Next »