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Astronomy - Earth Sciences - 22.06.2018
Earth's squishy interior gives rapid rise to Antarctica
Earth’s squishy interior gives rapid rise to Antarctica
Parts of Earth's crust are rising very slowly owing to post-glacial rebound, but using GPS, researchers have found that West Antarctica is rising faster than almost anywhere else in the world. And, ESA's GOCE gravity mission has, in turn, helped them to understand that the mantle below is unusually fluid.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 21.06.2018
Tall trees are crucial for the survival of the Amazon rainforest
Tall trees are crucial for the survival of the Amazon rainforest
An EPFL study has shown that Amazonian trees measuring more than 30 meters are more resistant to precipitation variations than other, shorter trees. This information is key to more accurately predicting how the rainforest, which is an important component of the carbon cycle, will react to climate change.

Astronomy - Earth Sciences - 20.06.2018
Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record time
Nearly 80 exoplanet candidates identified in record time
Scientists at MIT and elsewhere have analyzed data from K2, the follow-up mission to NASA's Kepler Space Telescope, and have discovered a trove of possible exoplanets amid some 50,000 stars. In a paper that appears online today in The Astronomical Journal , the scientists report the discovery of nearly 80 new planetary candidates, including a particular standout: a likely planet that orbits the star HD 73344, which would be the brightest planet host ever discovered by the K2 mission.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 13.06.2018
T. Rex Couldn't Stick Out Its Tongue
T. Rex Couldn’t Stick Out Its Tongue
Dinosaurs in reconstructions are often shown with tongues wildly waving - a feature that is incorrect, according to new research conducted by The University of Texas at Austin and the Chinese Academy of Sciences. Spencer Wright AUSTIN, Texas - Dinosaurs are often depicted as fierce creatures, baring their teeth, with tongues wildly stretching from their mouths like giant, deranged lizards.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 11.06.2018
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions, including the University of Bristol, provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. The paper, published today , demonstrates that higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations directly increase temperature and rainfall extremes, meaning there could be dangerous changes in these extremes even if the global mean temperature rise remains within 1.5°C.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 08.06.2018
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. The paper, published today , demonstrates that higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations directly increase temperature and rainfall extremes, meaning there could be dangerous changes in these extremes even if the global mean temperature rise remains within 1.5°C.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 07.06.2018
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapse
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapse
For the first time in our planet's 4.5 billion-year history a single species, humans, is increasingly dictating its future, according to a new book by UCL scientists.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Earth Sciences - 05.06.2018
Overpumping groundwater increases contamination risk
Pumping an aquifer to the last drop squeezes out more than water. A Stanford study finds it can also unlock dangerous arsenic from buried clays - and reveals how sinking land can provide an early warning and measure of contamination. For decades, intensive groundwater pumping has caused ground beneath California's San Joaquin Valley to sink, damaging infrastructure.

Astronomy - Earth Sciences - 04.06.2018
Thank the moon for Earth’s lengthening day
For anyone who has ever wished there were more hours in the day, geoscientists have some good news: Days on Earth are getting longer. A new study that reconstructs the deep history of our planet's relationship to the moon shows that 1.4 billion years ago, a day on Earth lasted just over 18 hours.

Earth Sciences - 04.06.2018
Scientists question the predictive value of earthquake foreshocks
A Stanford-led study questions previous findings about the value of foreshocks as warning signs that a big earthquake is coming, instead showing them to be indistinguishable from ordinary earthquakes. No one can predict when or where an earthquake will strike, but in 2011 scientists thought they had evidence that tiny underground tremors called foreshocks could provide important clues.

Earth Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 04.06.2018
Earth could have supported crust, life earlier than thought
A new study conducted in Nuvvuagittuq, Canada revealed evidence that the Earth's continental crust may have formed hundreds of millions of years earlier than thought. The early Earth might have been habitable much earlier than thought, according to new research from a group led by University of Chicago scientists.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 31.05.2018
«Top of Europe
«Top of Europe" for greenhouse gas
The research station at Jungfraujoch is at the top of Europe - and not only because of its unique location. Within the framework of the European research infrastructure «Integrated Carbon Observation System» (ICOS), the laboratory in the heart of the Alps is now officially certified. ICOS provides data to better understand the global carbon cycle and how human activities affect it.

Earth Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 30.05.2018
Seismometer Readings Could Offer Debris Flow Early Warning
Seismometer Readings Could Offer Debris Flow Early Warning
First came the fire, then the rain-and finally, the devastating mud.  In the wake of the largest wildfire in California's history, the December 2017 Thomas Fire, a powerful storm dumped about five inches of rain on the denuded hillsides of Ventura County, triggering debris flows on January 9 that killed 21 people and destroyed hundreds of homes in the Montecito and San Ysidro Creek areas.  Seismologists at Caltech noticed that the rumble and roar of the mudslide was detected by a seismometer about 1.5 kilometers away from the worst of the damage.

Earth Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 30.05.2018
Ice Shelves Compromised by Effects of Ocean and Atmosphere
Ice Shelves Compromised by Effects of Ocean and Atmosphere
AUSTIN, Texas - An international team of scientists has discovered that the world's ice shelves are being destabilized by forces from above and below, and have documented for the first time how these forces can work together to carve off enormous pieces of ice, allowing glaciers to accelerate their flow and adding to sea level rise.

Earth Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 30.05.2018
Ice Shelves Compromised by Effects of Ocean and Atmosphere W
Ice Shelves Compromised by Effects of Ocean and Atmosphere W
AUSTIN, Texas - An international team of scientists has discovered that the world's ice shelves are being destabilized by forces from above and below, and have documented for the first time how these forces can work together to carve off enormous pieces of ice, allowing glaciers to accelerate their flow and adding to sea level rise.

Earth Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 29.05.2018
Rise and fall of the Great Barrier Reef over 30,000 years
An international study led by Associate Professor Jody Webster has shown the reef is resilient to major environmental changes but is highly sensitive to increased sediment input and poor water quality. A landmark international study of the Great Barrier Reef has shown that in the past 30,000 years the world's largest reef system has suffered five death events, largely driven by changes in sea level and associated environmental change.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 25.05.2018
Dino-bird dandruff research head and shoulders above rest
Dino-bird dandruff research head and shoulders above rest
Palaeontologists from University College Cork (UCC) in Ireland have discovered 125 million-year-old dandruff preserved amongst the plumage of feathered dinosaurs and early birds, revealing the first evidence of how dinosaurs shed their skin. UCC's Dr Maria McNamara and her team studied the fossil cells, and dandruff from modern birds, with powerful electron microscopes for “The fossil cells are preserved with incredible detail - right down to the level of nanoscale keratin fibrils.

Earth Sciences - Astronomy - 23.05.2018
A promising target in the quest for a 1-million-year-old Antarctic ice core
A promising target in the quest for a 1-million-year-old Antarctic ice core
Ice cores offer a window into the history of Earth's climate. Layers of ice reveal past temperatures, and gases trapped in bubbles reveal past atmospheric composition. The oldest continuous ice core so far comes from Dome C in East Antarctica and extends back 800,000 years. But a tantalizing clue recently offered the possibility to go back even further.

Earth Sciences - 23.05.2018
Land rising above the sea 2.4 billion years ago transformed Earth’s life, climate
The composition of ancient shales shows that about 2.4 billion years ago, the pattern of precipitation changed as rainwater fell over larger continents and higher mountains, like these in the islands of Norway. Chemical signatures in shale rocks, a consolidated form of mud, point to an increased rate in the rise of land above the ocean 2.4 billion years ago-possibly triggering dramatic changes in climate and life.

Earth Sciences - 17.05.2018
Pass the toothpick! Feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teeth
Pass the toothpick! Feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives uncovered from grass fragments stuck in their teeth
A new study, led by scientists at the Institute of Vertebrate Paleontology and Paleoanthropology (IVPP) in Beijing, China, including University of Bristol PhD student Zhang Hanwen, examined the feeding habits of ancient elephant relatives that inhabited Central Asia some 17 million years ago. Professor Wang Shiqi from IVPP, the study's senior author, said: “We found ancient elephant teeth in the Junggar Basin, in China's far North West and they belong to two species, Gomphotherium connexum , and the larger G .
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