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Health - 03.07.2020
Early and responsive control measures helped reduce COVID-19 spread in China
China has contained coronavirus by introducing control measures early and adjusting them to respond to changes in transmission, a report finds. In Report 30 from the Imperial College London COVID-19 Response Team the team found that early implementation and timely adjustment of control measures could be important in containing coronavirus transmission.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.07.2020
Exploring the sun and targeting cancer: News from the College
Exploring the sun and targeting cancer: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From commencing a space study despite COVID-19 challenges, to a new drug and diet combo treatment for cancer, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Operating a spacecraft in lockdown After launching in February , the European Space Agency's (ESA) Solar Orbiter spacecraft has successfully completed four months of technical verification, known as commissioning.

Health - Social Sciences - 03.07.2020
Levels of depression and anxiety higher amongst those from BAME backgrounds during lockdown
People from BAME backgrounds have had higher levels of depression and anxiety throughout the Covid-19 lockdown, as well as lower levels of happiness and life satisfaction, finds UCL's Covid-19 Social Study. In addition, whilst 21% of people from white backgrounds have reported being often lonely during lockdown, this figure has been 23% amongst those from BAME backgrounds.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.07.2020
How the body regulates scar tissue growth after heart attacks
New UCLA research conducted in mice could explain why some people suffer more extensive scarring than others after a heart attack. The study, published in the journal Cell , reveals that a protein known as type 5 collagen plays a critical role in regulating the size of scar tissue in the heart. Once formed, heart scar tissue remains for life, reducing the heart's ability to pump blood and adding strain to the remaining heart muscle.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.07.2020
Popular chemotherapy drug may be less effective in overweight and obese women
Breast cancer patients who are overweight or obese might benefit less from treatment with docetaxel, a common chemotherapy drug, than lean patients. An international team of researchers based this conclusion on a retrospective analysis of data from a large clinical trial. Their study was published in the Journal of Clinical Oncology .

Health - Pharmacology - 03.07.2020
Researchers test tuberculosis vaccine combination for COVID-19
Sydney researchers are taking an innovative approach to designing potential COVID-19 vaccines - using a tuberculosis vaccine to deliver components of the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Early results from pre-clinical testing in mice are promising. Researchers at the University of Sydney and Centenary Institute are repurposing an existing tuberculosis vaccine to see if it can be used in a new way against COVID-19 to develop a novel vaccine.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.07.2020
How the body fights off urinary tract infections
How the body fights off urinary tract infections
Some people are better protected than others against urinary tract infections. This may be because their bodies produce more of a protein called uromodulin. An interdisciplinary research team has now found out how this helper protein brings relief when nature calls and how this knowledge might benefit the treatment and prevention of these painful inflammations.

Health - 02.07.2020
Why tummy bugs are so good at swimming through your gut
Why tummy bugs are so good at swimming through your gut
Researchers have solved the mystery of why a species of bacteria that causes food poisoning can swim faster in stickier liquids, such as within guts. The findings could potentially help scientists halt the bacteria in its tracks, because they show how the shape of the bacteria's body and the components that help it swim are all dependent on each other to work.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.07.2020
New sequencing technology will help scientists decipher disease mechanisms
New technologies capable of sequencing single molecules in fine detail will help scientists better understand the mechanisms of rare nucleotides thought to play an important role in the progression of some diseases. A review paper, led by a scientist at the University of Birmingham, describes how emerging sequencing technologies will transform our understanding of these molecules, ultimately leading to new drug targets.

Life Sciences - Health - 02.07.2020
Novel genetic causes of rare diseases, leading to improved diagnosis and better patient care
Novel genetic causes of rare diseases, leading to improved diagnosis and better patient care
Whole genome sequencing is the technology used by the 100,000 Genomes Project, a service set up by the government which aims to introduce routine genetic diagnostic testing in the NHS. The integration of genetic research with NHS diagnostic systems increases the likelihood that a patient will receive a diagnosis and the chance this will be provided within weeks rather than months.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.07.2020
Convalescent blood plasma given to COVID-19 patients
An Imperial researcher discussed a trial giving UK COVID-19 patients blood plasma from people who have recovered from coronavirus, in a recent talk. Professor Anthony Gordon, Chair in Anaesthesia and Critical Care at Imperial College London and a Consultant in Intensive Care Medicine at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, is leading a trial to investigate whether convalescent plasma transfusions improve the speed of recovery and chances of survival for patients with COVID-19.

Health - Pharmacology - 02.07.2020
COVID-19 vaccine technology can be used for future pandemics, says expert
The researcher developing a potential new coronavirus vaccine said the technology behind it could also be used for future pandemics, in a recent talk. Professor Robin Shattock, from the Department of Infectious Diseases at Imperial College London, is leading the development of a candidate vaccine. It is currently being tested in human trials to establish whether it can be well tolerated and produce an effective immune response against COVID-19.

Health - 02.07.2020
Has COVID-19 boosted interest in physical activity?
According to an analysis of Google Trends data led by researchers from the University of Sydney's Charles Perkins Centre online interest in exercise has been at an all-time high during the COVID-19 pandemic. "While I'd love to say this surge in searches has mirrored higher levels of physical activity in the community, it really is too early to tell," said Associate Professor Melody Ding , an epidemiologist and behavioural change scientist at the Charles Perkins Centre and Faculty of Medicine and Health.

Health - Pharmacology - 01.07.2020
Breast cancer found earlier in states with expanded Medicaid
In a new  Yale Cancer Center  (YCC) study, researchers have demonstrated that a higher percentage of women with breast cancer had their disease diagnosed at an early stage in states with expanded Medicaid coverage through the Affordable Care Act (ACA). No such change was seen in states that didn't expand their coverage.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2020
Secrets of naked mole-rat cancer resistance unearthed
Secrets of naked mole-rat cancer resistance unearthed
Naked mole-rats can live for an incredibly long time and have an exceptional resistance to cancer thanks to unique conditions in their bodies that stop cancer cells multiplying, according to new research.

Health - 01.07.2020
Big fall in numbers attending hospital emergency departments in England
There have been big reductions in people attending hospital A&E departments in England since the COVID-19 pandemic began, according to a new report. The report looked in detail at the number of people attending Accident and Emergency (A&E) departments in two hospitals in Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust , as well as at the wider picture across English hospitals.

Health - Materials Science - 01.07.2020
New plastic biomaterials could lead to tougher, more versatile medical implants
A new thermoplastic biomaterial, which is tough and strong but also easy to process and shape has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham. A type of nylon, the material's shape memory properties enable it to be stretched and moulded but able to reform into its original shape when heated.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.07.2020
Tiny mineral particles are better vehicles for promising gene therapy
University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers have developed a safer and more efficient way to deliver a promising new method for treating cancer and liver disorders and for vaccination - including a COVID-19 vaccine from Moderna Therapeutics that has advanced to clinical trials with humans. The technology relies on inserting into cells pieces of carefully designed messenger RNA (mRNA), a strip of genetic material that human cells typically transcribe from a person's DNA in order to make useful proteins and go about their business.

Social Sciences - Health - 01.07.2020
Researchers to investigate social contact and physical distancing behaviours during COVID-19
Understanding these contact patterns, and how people physically distance from each other in different settings and among different groups, will help policy makers design effective control strategies for preventing transmission. The CON-QUEST (COroNavirus QUESTionnaire) study, funded by the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute and supported by the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Behavioural Science and Evaluation , will initially focus on contacts between University staff and students to understand how coronavirus spreads in a university setting.

Health - 01.07.2020
Women who experience high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to develop heart disease
Women who experience high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to develop heart disease
Women who experience high blood pressure during pregnancy are more likely to develop heart disease and heart failure in later life, according to an international team of researchers. When we looked at all the available research, the answer was clear: women who develop high blood pressure during pregnancy - even when it doesn't develop into pre-eclampsia - are more likely to develop several different kinds of cardiovascular disease Clare Oliver-Williams Between 1-6% of all pregnancies in Western countries are affected by high blood pressure, which usually returns to normal after giving birth.
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