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Health - 10:06
Increase health benefits of exercise by working out before breakfast - new research
Exercising before eating breakfast burns more fat, improves how the body responds to insulin and lowers people's risk of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. According to a new study, published Friday 18 October 2019 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism, health scientists at the Universities of Bath and Birmingham found that by changing the timing of when you eat and exercise, people can better control their blood sugar levels.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2019
Stress test separates tough bacteria from the tender
By scooping the guts out of bacteria and refilling them with an expansive fluid, scientists can discover whether a microbe is structurally strong or weak, gaining insights that could help fight infectious diseases or aid studies of the beneficial bacterial communities known as microbiomes. Bacteria. Sometimes we can't live with 'em, but there's a growing appreciation that we can't live without 'em.

Health - 16.10.2019
Risk of brain damage in premature babies may reduce if born in specialist units
Extremely premature babies born in English hospitals with specialist neonatal intensive care units may have a reduced risk of brain damage and death. This is the finding of research, by a team from Imperial College London and the University of Turku , Finland, that involved 17,000 infants born in England earlier than 28 weeks gestation.

Pharmacology - Health - 16.10.2019
Global trial is first clear evidence that a widely available drug reduces head injury deaths
A low cost and widely available drug could reduce deaths in traumatic brain injury patients by as much as 20 per cent depending on the severity of injury, according to a major study carried out in collaboration with the University of Birmingham. The research, published in The Lancet, showed that tranexamic acid (TXA), a drug that prevents bleeding into the brain by inhibiting blood clot breakdown, has the potential to save hundreds of thousands of lives.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.10.2019
EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
Working with clinicians from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, a team of EPFL researchers has developed a conformable electrode implant that will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again. This new device could replace existing auditory brainstem implants, which have a number of shortcomings.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.10.2019
Shows why even well-controlled epilepsy can disrupt thinking
Transient bursts of high-frequency electrical activity in epileptic brain tissue can impair cognition even when no seizure is occurring, Stanford scientists have found. A study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators may help explain why even people benefiting from medications for their epilepsy often continue to experience bouts of difficulty thinking, perceiving and remembering clearly.

Health - 16.10.2019
Scientists link hormone production in baby wallabies to how some human girls are born with genitalia that appear more male than female
Research led by the Universities of Birmingham and Manchester has made a connection between the way baby wallabies produce male hormones and how some human girls are born with genitalia that resemble those of a boy. The research, published in PNAS and supported by the Wellcome Trust and the Medical Research Council, shows that an alternative pathway to the production of active male hormones - previously identified in the tammar wallaby pouch young - is present and active during human fetal development.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2019
Focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington’s disease
A new study examining the role that star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes play in Huntington's disease has identified a potential strategy that may halt the disease and repair some of the damage it causes. Astrocytes interact with and support neurons, or nerve cells, and other brain cells. Although astrocytes outnumber neurons, little is known about how they interact with synapses, the junctions between neurons that enable them to communicate and convey messages to each other.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.10.2019
Diabetes: a next-generation therapy soon available?
Diabetes: a next-generation therapy soon available?
By identifying a protein that helps regulate blood glucose and lipids, researchers at UNIGE hope for the rapid development of treatments more effective than current insulin therapy. Insulin, a hormone essential for regulating blood sugar and lipids, is normally produced by pancreatic - cells. In many people with diabetes, however, pancreatic cells are not (or no longer) functional, causing a chronic and potentially fatal insulin deficiency that can only be controlled through daily insulin injections.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2019
Raw Meat-Based Diets for Pets Pose a Health Risk for Humans
Multidrug-resistant bacteria are found in half of all dog foods made from raw meat, researchers from the University of Zurich have found. Feeding pets a diet of raw meat, also known as a "BARF" diet, is a growing trend. The resistant bacteria in the raw food can be transmitted to the pets - and thus also to humans.

Health - Environment - 15.10.2019
Predicting Ebola outbreaks by understanding how ecosystems influence human health
The next Ebola outbreak could be predicted using a new UCL-developed model that tracks how changes to ecosystems and human societies combine to affect the spread of the deadly infectious disease. The model could help policymakers to decide where to target vaccine deployment, or develop healthcare infrastructure, to reduce the risk of zoonotic disease outbreaks - illnesses that spread between animals and humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.10.2019
Antibody eradicates leukemia stem cells
The introduction of the drug imatinib in 2001 revolutionized the treatment of a type of cancer called chronic myelogenous leukemia. In more than 80% of people with CML who received the drug, the disease went into complete remission. However, in most people with chronic myelogenous leukemia, cancerous stem cells remain in the body for years after their cancer has gone into remission.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Researchers have discovered that a key cell type involved in liver injury and cancer consists of two cellular families with different origins and functions. The research by academics from the Universities of Edinburgh and Bristol and funded by the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council, is published today [Tuesday 15 October] .

Health - Music - 15.10.2019
First smart speaker system that uses white noise to monitor infants' breathing
First smart speaker system that uses white noise to monitor infants’ breathing
Gone are the days when people use smart speakers - like Amazon Echo or Google Home - only as kitchen timers or dinner party music players. These devices have started helping people track their own health, and can even monitor for cardiac arrest. Now researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new smart speaker skill that lets a device use white noise to both soothe sleeping babies and monitor their breathing and movement.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.10.2019
Inactive receptor renders immunotherapies ineffective
Inactive receptor renders immunotherapies ineffective
The aim of immunotherapies is to enable the immune system once again to fight cancer on its own. Drugs known as checkpoint inhibitors are already in clinical use for this purpose. However, they are only effective in about one third of patients. Based on analysis of human tissue samples, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered one reason why this is so: an inactive receptor in cancer cells prevents the drugs from reactivating the immune system.

Health - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
A Yale-developed drug shows promise as immune therapy for cancer
A therapy developed by Yale researchers stimulates immune cells to shrink or kill tumors in mice, according to a new study published in the Journal of Experimental Medicine. The therapy is effective alone or in combination with existing cancer immunotherapies, and it appears to have lasting effects, the researchers said.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.10.2019
Scientists help immune system find hidden cancer cells
Cancer cells are masters at avoiding detection, but a new system developed by Yale scientists can make them stand out from the crowd and help the immune system spot and eliminate tumors that other forms of immunotherapies might miss, the researchers report Oct. 14 Immunology. The new system reduced or eliminated melanoma and triple-negative breast and pancreatic tumors in mice, even those located far from the primary tumor source, the researchers report.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.10.2019
The electric switches in our brain need lipids
Our brain cells, and more specifically the channel proteins in the cell wall, need lipids - or fat - to function properly. These are the findings of an international study led by the Laboratory of Structural Neurobiology at KU Leuven. The researchers identified the structure of these proteins in the presence of a lipid molecule at the atomic level for the first time.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.10.2019
Unlocking the Biochemical Treasure Chest Within Microbes
Unlocking the Biochemical Treasure Chest Within Microbes
Secondary metabolites - the compounds produced by microbes to mediate internal and external messaging, self-defense, and chemical warfare - are the basis for hundreds of invaluable agricultural, industrial, and medical products. And given the increasing pace of discovery of new, potentially valuable secondary metabolites, it's clear that microbes have a great deal more to offer.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.10.2019
Yale faculty pioneer development and testing of portable MRI device
Yale researchers have agreed to develop, deploy, and test a new portable MRI scanner, a device its developer hopes will cost a fraction of that of traditional MRIs and make the new imaging technology available in clinics in the U.S. and around the world. The device, called Portable Point-of Care MRI System, was developed by Hyperfine Research Inc.
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