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Chemistry - Health - 12:06
New Model Shows Fire Emissions Pose Health Threats Hundreds of Miles from the Flames
A new model by researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's College of Engineering shows that health hazards from fires go beyond the burned areas, and fire emissions can contribute to cardiovascular disease hundreds of miles from the flames. The researchers said the risks are greater and more widespread than most predictive models show.

Pharmacology - Health - 09:36
Aggressive brain tumour could be diagnosed with simple blood test
Aggressive brain tumour could be diagnosed with simple blood test
New research by Sussex scientists could be the first step towards developing a blood test to diagnose the most aggressive type of brain tumour, known as Glioblastoma. A team from Professor Georgios Giamas' lab at the University of Sussex has identified novel biomarkers within bodily fluids, which signal the presence of the tumour.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.08.2019
X chromosome gene may explain why women are more prone to autoimmune diseases
FINDINGS A UCLA study revealed that a gene on the X chromosome may help explain why more women than men develop multiple sclerosis and other autoimmune diseases. Researchers found that a gene known as Kdm6a was expressed more in women's immune cells than in men's, and expressed more in female mice than in males.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
Optic nerve stimulation to aid the blind
Optic nerve stimulation to aid the blind
EPFL scientists are investigating new ways to provide visual signals to the blind by directly stimulating the optic nerve. Their preliminary study on animals uses a new type of neural electrode and provides distinct signals. Scientists from EPFL in Switzerland and Scuola Superiore Sant'Anna in Italy are developing technology for the blind that bypasses the eyeball entirely and sends messages to the brain.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
New hydrogels show promise in treating bone defects
Bioengineers and dentists from the UCLA School of Dentistry have developed a new hydrogel that is more porous and effective in promoting tissue repair and regeneration compared to hydrogels that are currently available. Once injected in a mouse model, the new hydrogel is shown to induce migration of naturally occurring stem cells to better promote bone healing.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
Potential treatments for citrus greening
Finding a treatment for a devastating, incurable citrus disease was personal for Sharon Long and Melanie Barnett. Now, a system they developed could provide clues to a cure. Over the course of 40 years, biologist Sharon Long has become an expert in symbiotic bacteria that help alfalfa grow. She has published over 150 papers on this one topic but when she realized her lab's decades of highly focused research could contribute to a solution for citrus greening - a disease that devastates citrus crops - she was inspired to go in a new direction.

Health - Social Sciences - 19.08.2019
'Hidden' data exacerbates rural public health inequities
’Hidden’ data exacerbates rural public health inequities
Differences in the health of rural residents compared to their urban neighbors are startling. In Washington, for instance, rural residents are one-third more likely to die from intentional self-harm or 13 percent more likely to die from heart disease. However, while statistics like these help guide public health policy and spending, they can hide even greater health disparities within those rural communities, said Betty Bekemeier , director of the UW School of Public Health's Northwest Center for Public Health Practice and a professor in the UW School of Nursing.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
Biochemists discover new insights into what may go awry in brains of people with Alzheimer’s
M ore than three decades of research on Alzheimer's disease have not produced any major treatment advances for those with the disorder, according to a UCLA expert who has studied the biochemistry of the brain and Alzheimer's for nearly 30 years. “Nothing has worked,” said Steven Clarke, a distinguished professor of chemistry and biochemistry.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
When liver disease affects the brain
When liver disease affects the brain
Scientists have demonstrated how chronic liver diseases cause molecular changes in the brain. They carried out their research using the 9.4 Tesla high-magnetic-field MRI machine at the Center for Biomedical Imaging (CIBM) at EPFL. The liver plays a vital role as a filter in the human body.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.08.2019
When a diseased liver disrupts the brain
When a diseased liver disrupts the brain
Researchers from UNIGE, CHUV, EPFL, CIBM, HUG and UNIL have demonstrated how chronic liver diseases cause molecular changes in the brain. The liver plays a vital role as a filter in the human body.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.08.2019
Smart interaction between proteins
Smart interaction between proteins
Very little was known till now about DNA repair by homologous recombination, which is fundamental for human health. Now an ETH research group has for the first time isolated and studied all the key proteins involved in this process, laying the foundation for investigating many diseases. Within our body, the process of cell division is constantly creating new cells to replace old or damaged ones.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.08.2019
New insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle
New insight into bacterial infections found in the noses of healthy cattle
New research led by academics at the University of Bristol Veterinary and Medical Schools used the 'One Health' approach to study three bacterial species in the noses of young cattle and found the carriage of the bacteria was surprisingly different. The findings which combined ideas and methods from both animal and human health research could help prevent and control respiratory diseases.

Health - Pharmacology - 16.08.2019
Relaxing of regulations for regenerative medicines has cascading effect internationally, new research warns
Countries that relax regulations for regenerative medicines could be causing a downward spiral in international standards, according to new research published today. Researchers warn that if just one country decides to relax regulations in the field, a heightened sense of competition can spur others to do the same.

Health - Innovation / Technology - 16.08.2019
Wireless sensors stick to skin and track health
Wireless sensors stick to skin and track health
Stanford engineers have developed experimental stickers that pick up physiological signals emanating from the skin, then wirelessly beam these health readings to a receiver clipped onto clothing. It's all part of a system called BodyNet. We tend to take our skin's protective function for granted, ignoring its other roles in signaling subtleties like a fluttering heart or a flush of embarrassment.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.08.2019
Dog detectives sniff out harmful bacteria causing lung infections
Dog detectives sniff out harmful bacteria causing lung infections
Sniffer dogs have been trained to detect ultra-low concentrations of bacteria which cause lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In a study by Imperial College London and the charity Medical Detection Dogs , researchers found that specially trained medical detection dogs were able to detect ultra-low concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), the most common cause of lung infection in people with CF.

Health - Environment - 15.08.2019
Heatwaves Increase Emergency Admissions to Swiss Hospitals
Heatwaves Increase Emergency Admissions to Swiss Hospitals
Numerous studies have shown that heat increases mortality rates. 1,2 In Switzerland, for example, the hot summer of 2015 caused around 800 additional deaths. 3 Only a few studies, however, have investigated the effects of heatwaves on morbidity and hospital admissions. Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) recently conducted a detailed analysis of emergency hospital admissions in Switzerland during the three heatwaves between June and August 2015 in a study commissioned by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN).

Health - 15.08.2019
Bringing back the colour to Egyptian coffin
The re-colourisation of a 2,600 year old coffin will give visitors to the Chau Chak Wing Museum a vivid picture of the colours and hieroglyphics used to decorate wooden coffins in 7 th century BC Egypt. The digital model of the coffin of Mer-Neith-it-es will feature in the dedicated Mummy Room at the new museum, due to open next year.

Health - Materials Science - 15.08.2019
Plasma coating developed to decrease bone implant rejections
Plasma coating developed to decrease bone implant rejections
One million Australians have undergone joint replacement surgery and the numbers are growing. University of Sydney researchers have developed a bone implant coating that could lead to improved implant outcomes. An international research project, led by the University of Sydney's School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering and the School of Physics in collaboration with UMC Utrecht and the Heart Research Institute and three other research partners, has developed a new plasma coating for bone implants with the aim of decreasing complications.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.08.2019
Asthmatics over-using over-the-counter puffers: study
Asthmatics over-using over-the-counter puffers: study
For the first time, details about Australians using over-the-counter reliever puffers have been revealed, indicating people may be placing themselves at risk by not getting a diagnosis and taking preventative medication. Australian asthmatics are overusing reliever medication, according to new research that strongly suggests many are failing to manage their condition.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.08.2019
Questions expected link between farming and evolution of immune system
Researchers have long theorized that cultural shifts thousands of years ago from hunting and gathering to agriculture and living in permanent settlements spurred an increase in diseases like smallpox and measles. Compared to hunter-gatherers, farmers stayed put, living close to one another and their animals.
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