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Health - 06.12.2019
Grow your own blood vessel model in a dish
Grow your own blood vessel model in a dish
Personalised blood vessel testing kit could unravel causes and treatments for heart attack, stroke and vascular dementia, find scientists. Researchers can now grow a model of a patient's blood vessel wall in a dish from a small sample of their blood. The technology could be used to create personalised testing kits for new drugs and advance research into diseases of the blood vessels including stroke, heart attack and vascular dementia.

Health - 06.12.2019
One third of premature deaths linked to social inequality
Nearly 900,000 deaths in England could have been avoided in a more equal society, according to a UCL study of 2.5 million premature deaths over the last 16 years. The study, published today in The Lancet Public Health , found that one in three deaths before the age of 75 are attributable to socio-economic and regional health inequalities.

Health - 06.12.2019
Tick box questionnaire could significantly improve oesophageal cancer survival rates
A simple health questionnaire could be a highly effective tool to pre-screen people for early signs of oesophageal cancer, enabling much earlier diagnosis and treatment, finds a UCL-led study. The research, published in Lancet Digital Health , used artificial intelligence to analyse a large oesophageal cancer dataset, known as BEST2 (1,299 patients), to establish which health factors were common in those individuals who had Barrett's oesophagus.

Life Sciences - Health - 06.12.2019
How do you cultivate a healthy plant microbiome?
Plant leaves harbor a diverse microbial community, as seen in this plate of agar stamped with the leaf of a greenhouse-grown tomato plant. After incubating for two days, the bacteria from the leaf grew into visible colonies. (Photo courtesy of Britt Koskella lab) Scientists are homing in on what a healthy human microbiome looks like, mapping the normal bacteria that live in and on the healthy human body.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.12.2019
Patients at risk because NHS hospitals using different record-keeping systems
A major survey of medical record keeping in the NHS has revealed critical deficiencies that could risk patients' safety. Researchers at the Institute of Global Health Innovation (IGHI) at Imperial College London, found NHS Trusts were using at least 21 different electronic medical record systems which are unable to effectively share information.

Health - 06.12.2019
Domestic abuse survivors twice at risk of long-term illnesses
Female survivors of domestic abuse are at double the risk of developing long-term illnesses that cause widespread bodily pain and extreme tiredness, shows a study by the Universities of Birmingham and Warwick. Published today in the Journal of Interpersonal Violence , the research shows that women who have experienced domestic abuse are almost twice as likely to develop fibromyalgia and chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS) than those who have not.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.12.2019
Delirium linked to brain injury after severe surgery
In a new study published today [Dec. 5, 2019] in the journal Brain, researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison School of Medicine and Public Health have discovered that delirium following severe surgery may be associated with brain injury. "For a long time it has been thought that delirium, a state of confusion that can arise in sick patients, may lead to dementia and long-term cognitive problems," says study leader Robert Sanders, assistant professor of anesthesiology at the UW School of Medicine and Public Health.

Pharmacology - Health - 05.12.2019
Reveals dramatic rise in patients ’cured’ of heart condition following GP performance pay scheme
The introduction of a performance-related financial incentive scheme for GPs led to a dramatic almost five-fold rise in the number of patients whose heart rhythm condition was said to have been ‘cured', say University of Birmingham researchers. Academics at the University of Birmingham's Institute of Applied Health Research, supported by NIHR ARC West Midlands, conducted a study into patients with the most common heart rhythm condition, called atrial fibrillation.

Health - 05.12.2019
Taming chronic inflammation may reduce illness, save lives
Scientists from 22 institutions, including UCLA, are recommending early diagnosis, prevention and treatment of severe chronic inflammation to reduce the risk of chronic disease and death worldwide. The group of international experts, which also includes scientists from the National Institutes of Health, Stanford University, Harvard Medical School, Columbia University Medical Center and University College London, point to inflammation-related diseases as the cause of 50 percent of all deaths worldwide.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.12.2019
NeuroRestore Center: aimed at restoring lost neurological function
NeuroRestore Center: aimed at restoring lost neurological function
The Defitech Foundation has teamed up with EPFL, CHUV and UNIL to widen access to the groundbreaking neurotechnology developed under the 2018 STIMO study, which allowed paraplegic patients to walk again. Their aim is also to develop new neurosurgical treatments for people suffering from Parkinson's disease or from neurological disorders following a head injury or stroke.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.12.2019
Being active reduces risk of prostate cancer
This new study, published in the International Journal of Epidemiology today [5 December], was led by the University of Bristol and co-funded by World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) and Cancer Research UK (CRUK). It found that people with the variation in their DNA sequence that makes them more likely to be active, had a 51 per cent reduced risk of prostate cancer than people who did not have this particular variation.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.12.2019
With cellular blueprint for lungs, researchers look to organ regeneration
Using sophisticated screening across animal species, researchers at Yale have created a cellular blueprint of the human lung that will make it easier to understand the design principles behind lung function and disease - and to bioengineer new lungs. The research, published Dec.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.12.2019
Failure of the molecular bodyguard in Parkinson's disease
Failure of the molecular bodyguard in Parkinson’s disease
Scientists from ETH Zurich and the University of Basel's Biozentrum have shown that chaperone proteins dynamically bind to the Parkinson protein -synuclein. If this interaction is disturbed, it leads to cell damage and the formation of aggregates typical for the disease. Parkinson's disease is characterised by the progressive death of nerve cells in the brain.

Pharmacology - Health - 04.12.2019
Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal
Typhoid vaccine over 81% effective in tackling disease in Nepal
A large field study of typhoid conjugate vaccine (TCV) in Nepal has shown a single dose to be safe and effective in reducing typhoid in children aged 9 months to <16 years in an endemic setting. Caused by the bacterium Salmonella Typhi, typhoid is a major cause of fever in children in lowand middle-income countries and is responsible for nearly 11 million cases and more than 116,000 deaths a year worldwide.

Health - Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Young women face unnecessary surgery for suspected appendicitis - study
Thousands of young women are unnecessarily admitted to UK hospitals and undergo surgery they do not need each year in the NHS, according to a new study. Surgery for appendicitis is one of the world's most common emergency operations. UK hospitals exhibit the world's highest rate of ‘normal appendicectomy,' where patients undergo surgery for suspected appendicitis but laboratory examination of the removed appendix finds it to be normal.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.12.2019
Big data toolkit to mine the dark genome for precision medicine
Big data toolkit to mine the dark genome for precision medicine
EPFL researchers have developed Big Data tools for identifying new gene functions. The work identifies millions of connections between genes and their functions, and can facilitate the development of precision medicine. Genes are the functional units of heredity, and the understanding of gene function is the major focus of biomedical research, serving as the basis of precision medicine.

Health - Social Sciences - 04.12.2019
Rural residents at greater risk of maternal morbidity and mortality compared to urban residents
Childbirth is increasingly risky in the United States. Maternal deaths and potentially life-threatening complications - called severe maternal morbidity - are climbing. This reality is especially challenging for rural communities, which face declining access to obstetric services. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, there are approximately 700 maternal deaths and an additional 50,000 cases of severe maternal morbidity in the U.S. every year.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.12.2019
One dose of radiotherapy as effective as five doses for cancer in the spine
A single dose of radiotherapy is as "effective" as five doses for end-of-life cancer patients suffering with painful spinal canal compression, finds a large study conducted by UCL. Spinal canal compression is a common complication in cancer patients when the cancer has spread to their spine. Radiotherapy is used to control pain and alleviate symptoms.

Life Sciences - Health - 03.12.2019
World first as artificial neurons developed to cure chronic diseases
Artificial neurons on silicon chips that behave just like the real thing have been invented by scientists - a first-of-its-kind achievement with enormous scope for medical devices to cure chronic diseases, such as heart failure, Alzheimer's, and other diseases of neuronal degeneration. Critically the artificial neurons not only behave just like biological neurons but only need one billionth the power of a microprocessor, making them ideally suited for use in medical implants and other bio-electronic devices.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.12.2019
Rare Disease Q&A: What Rare Diseases Are and Why That Matters
Rare Disease Q&A: What Rare Diseases Are and Why That Matters
Rare diseases are … rare, right? Not as rare as you might think. As much as 10% of the population is thought to have a "rare disease." Unfortunately, due to a lack of understanding, many rare diseases remain very difficult to diagnose and treat. Inspired by the enormous unmet needs of people with rare diseases, a group of scientists from across the globe has teamed up to develop open-access tools and resources for sharing disease characteristics and treatment information.
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