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Health - Life Sciences - 08:00
New contents: Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected
New contents: Neuronal Parkinson inclusions are different than expected
An international team of researchers involving members of the University of Basel's Biozentrum challenges the conventional understanding of the cause of Parkinson's disease. The researchers have shown that the inclusions in the brain's neurons, characteristic of Parkinson's disease, are comprised of a membranous medley rather than protein fibrils.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.06.2019
How the brain helps us make good decisions - and bad ones
A prevailing theory in neuroscience holds that people make decisions based on integrated global calculations that occur within the frontal cortex of the brain.  However, Yale researchers have found that three distinct circuits connecting to different brain regions are involved in making good decisions, bad ones, and determining which of those past choices to store in memory, they report June 25 in the journal Neuron.

Pharmacology - Health - 24.06.2019
New Therapy Promotes Vascular Repair Following Stroke
New Therapy Promotes Vascular Repair Following Stroke
Following a stroke, antibodies that inhibit the signaling molecule Nogo-A can help repair blood vessels in the affected brain regions. This also promotes the regaining of motor functions, researchers at the University of Zurich have shown in a mouse model. The study opens up new avenues for treatment.

Health - 24.06.2019
More women in U.S. receive 3-D mammography but disparities remain
Use of 3-D mammography, an advanced form of breast cancer screening, has risen rapidly in recent years, according to Yale researchers in a new study. But adoption of the technology varies widely, reflecting emerging disparities in care, they said. The study was published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine.

Health - 24.06.2019
Deportation worries haunt U.S.-born Latinx youth
Fear of losing loved ones to deportation may be fueling higher levels of anxiety and poorer sleep quality among U.S.-born teenage children of Mexican and Central American immigrants, shows a new UC Berkeley study. (UC Berkeley image by Hulda Nelson) The rise of anti-immigration rhetoric and policies in the United States following the 2016 presidential election may be taking its toll on the health of California's Latinx youth, including those who are U.S. citizens, suggests a new study led by University of California, Berkeley, researchers.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
Researchers Develop First Mind-controlled Robotic Arm Without Brain Implants
A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, in collaboration with the University of Minnesota, has made a breakthrough that could benefit paralyzed patients and those with movement disorders. Using a noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI), scientists have developed the first successful mind-controlled robotic arm exhibiting the ability to continuously track and follow a computer cursor.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
A bacterial remnant may explain arthritis in Lyme patients
Even after antibiotic treatment, some Lyme disease patients continue to suffer from debilitating arthritis. A new Yale study may explain why. The tick-borne bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi leaves behind parts of its cell wall in patients' joints, which appears to trigger an immune reaction that contributes to the inflammation observed in Lyme arthritis patients, the researchers report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Health - 21.06.2019
Detecting problems of the anti-bleeding system in 60 minutes
Detecting problems of the anti-bleeding system in 60 minutes
Researchers from the Universities of Geneva and Franche-Comté have developed an innovative device that investigates a patient's platelet capacity in near real-life conditions so that bleeding can be stopped (haemostasis). Various diseases can cause haemorrhages or thromboses, sometimes fatal, resulting in particular from complications during surgery.

Health - Environment - 21.06.2019
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
No conclusive links to health effects from waste incinerators
Researchers have found no link between exposure to emissions from municipal waste incinerators (MWIs) and infant deaths or reduced foetal growth. However, they show living closer to the incinerators themselves is associated with a very small increase in the risk of some birth defects, compared to the general population.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
One Third of Cambodians Infected with Threadworm
One Third of Cambodians Infected with Threadworm
Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted threadworm that is endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. In a nation-wide study in Cambodia, Swiss TPH scientists and their partners found that nearly a third of the population is infected with S. stercoralis. The results were published today in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 20.06.2019
Spaceship Concordia
Spaceship Concordia
Science for the benefit of space exploration does not only happen off planet. While some studies require the weightless isolation of the International Space Station, another location provides the right conditions for investigating the consequences of spaceflight, and it is right here on Earth. The 2018 crew of Concordia research station in Antarctica recently returned to the European Astronaut Centre in Cologne to wrap up their time as researchers and subjects at Earth's most remote outpost.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2019
Bats’ brains sync when they socialize
Socializing bats show highly correlated brain activity, shows a new UC Berkeley study. (Kim Taylor/Warren Photographic photo) The phrase "we're on the same wavelength" may be more than just a friendly saying: A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers shows that bats' brain activity is literally in sync when bats engage in social behaviors like grooming, fighting or sniffing each other.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2019
Using human genome, scientists build CRISPR for RNA to open pathways for medicine
Less than a decade ago, biology underwent one of those once-in-a-generation events that shakes up a scientific field, when the discovery of gene editing technology called CRISPR/Cas-9 made it possible to precisely alter the sequence of DNA in a living being. But while DNA may be the raw blueprints for life, RNA is the architect-translating those ideas into reality for the cell through proteins and regulation.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
For the first time, Bernese researchers have been able to solve the structure of a transport protein and thus to describe the functional mechanism that plays a significant role in the survival of cancer cells. This is an important step towards developing effective inhibitors and fight tumor growth. Certain cancer cells depend on exporting the metabolite lactate, which accumulates during the generation on energy.

Social Sciences - Health - 20.06.2019
Results Provide Basis for Targeted WASH Interventions in Rohingya Refugee Camp
Results Provide Basis for Targeted WASH Interventions in Rohingya Refugee Camp
Currently, around 910,000 Rohingya refugees live in Cox's Bazar District in Bangladesh after having fled violence faced in Myanmar, resulting in one of the most rapid exoduses in modern history. In a project funded by UNICEF and coordinated by Swiss TPH, a study was conducted to identify and understand WASH practices of the populations living in the camp.

Health - Physics - 20.06.2019
Researchers harness AI to combat colon cancer
Researchers harness AI to combat colon cancer
Engineers have shown that it is technically possible to use an AI system to guide a tiny robotic capsule inside the colon to take microultrasound images. Known as a ‘Sonopill', the device could spell the end for painful endoscopic examinations for patients, where a semi-rigid scope is passed into the bowel.

Health - 19.06.2019
How an emerging tick-borne pathogen evades detection
Human babesiosis is an emerging infectious disease transmitted to humans by ticks. A team of Yale researchers has discovered how Babesia microti, one of the two Babesia parasite species that transmit the disease in the United States, communicates with its host. Parasites and other pathogens usually secrete proteins to evade the immune system or change the structure of the host's cells to adapt and survive.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.06.2019
Federal guidelines may restrict women’s access to effective HIV protection
Restrictive recommendations for pre-exposure prophylaxis (or PrEP) issued by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) systematically disqualified nearly all women at risk for HIV and/or motivated to use the medication, researchers at the Yale School of Public Health and George Washington University have found.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 19.06.2019
'Alexa, monitor my heart': Researchers develop first contactless cardiac arrest AI system for smart speakers
’Alexa, monitor my heart’: Researchers develop first contactless cardiac arrest AI system for smart speakers
Almost 500,000 Americans die each year from cardiac arrest , when the heart suddenly stops beating. People experiencing cardiac arrest will suddenly become unresponsive and either stop breathing or gasp for air, a sign known as agonal breathing. Immediate CPR can double or triple someone's chance of survival, but that requires a bystander to be present.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.06.2019
Cell Division at High Speed
Cell Division at High Speed
06/19/2019 When two proteins work together, this worsens the prognosis for lung cancer patients: their chances of survival are particularly poor in this case. In malignant tumours, the cells usually proliferate quickly and uncontrollably. A research team from the Biocenter of Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, has discovered that two important regulators of cell division can interact in this process.
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