« BACK

Health



Results 1 - 20 of 11698.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 585 Next »


Health - 09:31
One in two Swiss people will have smoked weed by 2045
One in two Swiss people will have smoked weed by 2045
Three decades from now, nearly half of the Swiss population will have had some experience with cannabis use. According to a new study by the University of Zurich, the number of active users will rise as well, increasing by 50% compared to 2015 - unless the government establishes new regulations. Countries such as Canada and Uruguay have introduced new paradigms when it comes to regulating the sale and consumption of cannabis.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.04.2019
Evidence of heart injury in ’healthy’ people may lead to more effective treatment
New evidence of heart injury found in apparently healthy people could help pave the way for better long-term monitoring of cardiac health and personalised approaches to treatment, scientists say. Their findings appear today in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation, based on research conducted at the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Oxford, New South Wales and Johns Hopkins University.

Health - 24.04.2019
Parents reassured febrile seizures following vaccination not dangerous
University of Sydney research finds that febrile seizures after vaccination are rare, not serious and are no different to febrile seizures due to other causes, such as from a virus. New research from the University of Sydney has found the severity of febrile seizures following vaccination is no different to febrile seizures from another cause, such as from a virus, and that the majority of seizures are short-lived, self-resolving and don't require ongoing treatment.

Health - 24.04.2019
Elderberries could help minimise flu symptoms
A group of chemical and biomolecular engineers has determined that elderberries can help the fight against influenza, by reducing symptoms and severity of the virus. Folk medicines and herbal products have been used for millennia to combat a whole range of ailments, at times to the chagrin of modern scientists who have struggled to explain their medicinal benefits.

Health - 23.04.2019
Low mobility predicts hospital readmission in older heart attack patients
Close to 20% of elderly adults who have suffered a heart attack will be readmitted to the hospital within 30 days. Performance on a simple mobility test is the best predictor of whether an elderly heart attack patient will be readmitted, a Yale-led study reports. Appearing in Circulation: Cardiovascular Quality and Outcomes, the study describes the first risk model for hospital readmission specifically developed for older heart attack patients.

Health - Pharmacology - 23.04.2019
Simple and Fast Method for Radiolabelling Antibodies against Breast Cancer
Simple and Fast Method for Radiolabelling Antibodies against Breast Cancer
Radioactive antibodies that target cancer cells are used for medical diagnostics with PET imaging or for targeted radioimmunotherapy. Researchers from the University of Zurich have created a new method for radiolabelling antibodies using UV light. In less than 15 minutes, the proteins are ready-to-use for cancer imaging or therapy.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 23.04.2019
Improved WIC food packages reduced children's risk for obesity
Improved WIC food packages reduced children’s risk for obesity
Sweeping changes designed to make the food more nutritious in a federal assistance program for low-income families reduced the risk for obesity for 4-year-olds who had been on the program since birth, according to new research. The study of the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, or WIC, was conducted by researchers from the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health , Tulane University and Los Angeles-based PHFE WIC, the nation's largest local WIC agency and a program of Heluna Health.

Health - Pharmacology - 22.04.2019
Identifies why some colds cause asthma attacks in children
Upper respiratory infections remain one of the most common triggers of asthma attacks in children, but not every cold leads to a dangerous worsening of symptoms, even among children with severe asthma. The reasons for this have mostly gone unanswered for decades, but a new study led by the University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health provides some insight on what differentiates a cold that leads to an asthma attack from a cold that remains a cold.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.04.2019
Innovative drug delivery improves effectiveness of cancer immunotherapy
Even after decades of research, cancer remains difficult to treat, in part because of its ability to evade the body's natural defenses found in the immune system. Immunotherapy, which stimulates the body's immune system to find and attack cancer and other diseases, has offered a new avenue for treatment.

Pharmacology - Health - 19.04.2019
When psychiatric medications are abruptly discontinued, withdrawal symptoms may be mistaken for relapse
Withdrawal symptoms following the practice of discontinuation, or abruptly “coming off,” of psychiatric drugs in randomized clinical trials may be mistaken for relapse and bolster the case for continued use of medication, according to two new studies by UCLA researchers published in the journal Psychotherapy and Psychosomatics.

Health - Materials Science - 19.04.2019
Possible blood test for colon cancer
Up to half of people who should be screened for colorectal cancer do not get the routine procedure. A blood test to detect colorectal cancer being developed by Stanford doctors and materials scientists could help change that. Colorectal cancer is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in the U.S. and a growing problem around the world, but not because it's a particularly difficult cancer to detect and halt.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.04.2019
Next frontier in study of gut bacteria: mining microbial molecules
The human gut harbors trillions of invisible microbial inhabitants, referred to as the microbiota, that collectively produce thousands of unique small molecules. The sources and biological functions of the vast majority of these molecules are unknown. Yale researchers recently applied a new technology to uncover microbiota-derived chemicals that affect human physiology, revealing a complex network of interactions with potentially broad-reaching impacts on human health.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
Microbiomes of diabetic foot ulcers are associated with clinical outcomes
MADISON - New research suggests that the microbial communities associated with chronic wounds common in diabetic patients affect whether those wounds heal or lead to amputations. Work led by University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Professor of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Lindsay Kalan and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania found that particular strains of the common pathogen Staphylococcus aureus exclusively infected diabetic foot ulcers that never healed, indicating these strains may delay healing.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
More severe salmonella outbreaks ahead
More severe salmonella outbreaks ahead
University of Sydney researchers have developed a model that can predict outbreaks several months in advance, and its results come as a warning ahead of the Easter long weekend. Australia has more salmonella outbreaks than any other country in the world, with the number of cases doubling over the last decade.

Health - 17.04.2019
Risk factors identified for patients undergoing knee replacements
Risk factors identified for patients undergoing knee replacements
In the largest study of its kind, researchers from the Musculoskeletal Research Unit at the University of Bristol have identified the most important risk factors for developing severe infection after knee replacement. Patients who are under 60 years of age, males, those with chronic pulmonary disease, diabetes, liver disease, and a higher body mass index are at increased risk of having the joint replacement redone (known as revision) due to infection.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.04.2019
Scientists restore some functions in a pig’s brain hours after death
Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death, Yale scientists report April 17 . The brain of a postmortem pig obtained from a meatpacking plant was isolated and circulated with a specially designed chemical solution.

Health - 17.04.2019
Breast cancer blood test could help to spot relapse earlier
Breast cancer blood test could help to spot relapse earlier
A simple blood test could help to detect breast cancer relapse up to two years earlier than imaging in patients with early-stage breast cancer. In a small study, carried out by the University of Leicester and Imperial College London and funded by Cancer Research UK, researchers showed that the blood test was able to detect 89 per cent of all relapses, on average 8.9 months quicker than imaging.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.04.2019
Mystery arthritis-linked knee bone three times more common than 100 years ago
Mystery arthritis-linked knee bone three times more common than 100 years ago
The fabella, a small bone in the knee once lost to human evolution, has made a surprising resurgence over the last century. We are taught the human skeleton contains 206 bones, but our study challenges this. Dr Michael Berthaume Department of Bioengineering The new findings could help clinicians treating patients with knee issues and provide insight into human evolution over the past 100 years.

Health - Career - 16.04.2019
Workplace wellness programs fail to improve health
Workplace wellness programs have been touted as a powerful tool that can make employees healthier and more productive while reducing health care spending, but the results of a new study suggest such interventions yield less-than-impressive results. The findings by University of Chicago and Harvard University scholars, published April 16 in the Journal of the American Medical Association , raise questions about the effectiveness of such programs offered by 80 percent of large U.S. employers in the $8 billion workplace wellness industry.

Health - 16.04.2019
New test could lead to personalized treatments for cystic fibrosis
Cystic fibrosis is a devastating disease caused by mutations in a specific gene, known as the CFTR gene. But not everyone with cystic fibrosis has the same symptoms or responds to drug treatments in the same way. In a new pilot study, researchers from the University of Cambridge and Yale University developed a novel, straightforward way to test multiple drugs on cells obtained from individual patients with cystic fibrosis, raising the possibility of highly personalized drug treatment.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 585 Next »