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Health - Life Sciences - 08:00
Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you
Why a blow to the chest can kill or save you
It is still a mystery why a blow to the chest can kill some people yet save others. We may be one step closer to an answer, however, thanks to a device developed by researchers at EPFL and the University of Bern that can replicate the experience in the laboratory. A blow to the chest can have highly contrasting effects.

Health - 21.02.2019
Venezuelan crisis could cause public health emergency in South America
Since the early 2000s Venezuela has faced severe economic crisis caused by political instability and declining oil revenue. In particular, public health provision has suffered with an exodus of trained medical professionals and long-term shortages in medicines and medical supplies. As a result the country, which was once a leader in public health policies and disease control in Latin America, is now facing a re-emergence of many deadly diseases on a scale scientists describe as “an epidemic of unprecedented proportions”.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2019
Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life
Half-a-billion-year-old weird wonder worm finally gets its place in the tree of life
Palaeobiologists from the University of Bristol have shed new light on a jaw-snapping species of prehistoric worm using half-a-billion-year-old fossils kept at the Smithsonian Institute in Washington DC. Amiskwia was originally described by the famous palaeontologist Charles Doolittle Walcott (1850-1927) in 1911 who compared it to the modern arrow worms (chaetognaths) - a group of ocean-dwelling worms that are fierce predators, equipped with an array of spines on their head for grasping small prey.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.02.2019
Three years into soda tax, sugary drink consumption down more than 50 percent in Berkeley
Three years into soda tax, sugary drink consumption down more than 50 percent in Berkeley
Consumption of sugary drinks in Berkeley's diverse and low-income neighborhoods dropped precipitously in 2015, just months after the city levied the nation's first soda tax on sugar-sweetened beverages. Three years later, residents in these neighborhoods reported drinking 52 percent fewer servings of sugary drinks than they did before the tax was passed in November 2014, shows a new report from the University of California, Berkeley.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.02.2019
New type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves
New type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves
UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves. The findings could pave the way for new treatments for heart valve disorders, which can be caused by congenital defects, aging or disease. Their study, led by Dr. Atsushi “Austin” Nakano, a UCLA associate professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology and member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA , was published in the journal Developmental Cell.

Health - Pharmacology - 21.02.2019
New care package can improve treatment of people with acute kidney injury
A large clinical trial involving people with acute kidney injury has found that a new package of interventions can significantly improve the diagnosis and treatment of patients, as well as improving their care experience. Acute kidney injury (AKI) is a sudden or rapid decline in kidney function that can lead to hospital admission, longer hospital stays, increased mortality risk and long-term kidney damage.

Health - 21.02.2019
New sensor technology can diagnose reproductive health problems in real-time
Researchers have developed new robotic sensor technology that has the capability to diagnose women's reproductive health problems in real-time. The technology, developed by researchers at Imperial College London and The University of Hong Kong , can be used to measure hormones that affect fertility, sexual development and menstruation more quickly and cheaply than current methods.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.02.2019
Bat Influenza Viruses Could Infect Humans
Bat Influenza Viruses Could Infect Humans
Bats don't only carry the deadly Ebola virus, but are also a reservoir for a new type of influenza virus. These newly discovered flu viruses could potentially also attack the cells of humans and livestock, researchers at the University of Zurich have now shown. Seasonal outbreaks of the flu are caused by influenza viruses that can only infect people.

Health - 21.02.2019
Supporting driver retirement for people with dementia
Researchers are calling for Australia's system of managing driver retirement for people with dementia to be overhauled. A University of Queensland study found a lack of suitable screening and assessment measures remained an issue for General Practitioners. Dr Theresa Scott of the UQ School of Psychology said the research revealed a number of complexities in the existing system.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.02.2019
Long-term benefits from intensive therapy in early stages of MS
New findings by researchers at Cardiff University suggest that intensive therapy during the early stages of multiple sclerosis (MS) leads to better long-term outcomes for patients, despite it often being viewed as a riskier option than other first line treatments. Dr Emma Tallantyre, from Cardiff University's Division of Psychological Medicine and Clinical Neurosciences, said: “Over the last 10-20 years we have seen huge advances in the treatment of relapsing-remitting MS, with over 12 licensed medications having been shown to suppress disease activity.

Health - 20.02.2019
Yale first in Connecticut to offer advanced cardiac test
Radiologists and cardiologists at Yale School of Medicine are the first in Connecticut and among the first in the Northeast to use a new personalized cardiac test that can predict the need for cardiac catheterizations. Patients at Yale-New Haven Hospital are the first in the region to benefit from this new technology for analyzing blood flow to the heart.

Pharmacology - Health - 20.02.2019
New Method Identifies Which Asthma Patients Respond to Systemic Corticosteroids
Computational tool could help relieve suffering for patients not helped by mainline therapy Physicians will be able to predict which of their patients with severe asthma are likely to benefit from treatment with systemic corticosteroids - and which might only suffer their side effects - with help from a dozen clinical variables researchers have identified using machine learning techniques.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.02.2019
Improving diagnosis of colorectal cancer
Current faecal blood tests for colorectal cancer have a sixty percent false positive rate. New funding from Cancer Research UK is helping scientists at Cardiff University to find better, safer tests . Inaccuracy of initial tests for colorectal cancer are putting patients at unnecessary risk, highlighting vital need for the development of precise and non-invasive testing.

Health - Computer Science / Telecom - 20.02.2019
Researchers Develop Method To ID Diseases with Less Data
As artificial intelligence systems learn to better recognize and classify images, they are becoming highly reliable at diagnosing diseases, such as skin cancer, from medical images. But as good as they are at detecting patterns, AI won't be replacing your doctor any time soon. Even when used as a tool, image recognition systems still require an expert to label the data, and a lot of data at that: it needs images of both healthy patients and sick patients.

Health - 19.02.2019
"Origami" diagnostic device offers affordable malaria diagnoses
Simple folded sheets of waxed paper could help bring affordable, reliable field tests for diseases such as malaria to remote parts of the developing world, scientists say. In a new paper published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, researchers from universities in Scotland and China, working together with the Ministry of Health in Uganda, describe for the first time how origami-style folded paper, prepared with a printer and a hot plate, has helped detect malaria with 98% sensitivity in infected participants from two primary schools in Uganda.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.02.2019
Seeing the unseeable
Researchers at Cardiff University have used x-ray crystallography and computer simulation to get a closer look at how viruses bind cells and cause infection. The new insight could help in the development of drugs and therapies for infections and further advance the exploitation of viruses for medical treatments.

Health - 19.02.2019
More primary care physicians leads to longer life spans
Life expectancy grows when there are more primary care physicians in the field, yet their numbers are shrinking as medical students saddled with debt turn to more lucrative fields, according to a study led by researchers at Stanford and Harvard. New research shows us just how important primary care physicians are in prolonging our lives.

Health - Pharmacology - 19.02.2019
World's first gene therapy operation for common cause of sight loss carried out
World’s first gene therapy operation for common cause of sight loss carried out
Researchers in Oxford have carried out the world's first gene therapy operation to tackle the root cause of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), the UK's most common cause of sight loss. The procedure was carried out at the John Radcliffe Hospital by Professor Robert MacLaren, Professor of Ophthalmology at the University of Oxford, with the support of the NIHR Oxford Biomedical Research Centre in a clinical trial sponsored by Gyroscope Therapeutics, a UK-based company developing genetically-defined therapies for the treatment of eye diseases.

Astronomy / Space Science - Health - 15.02.2019
Astronaut photography benefiting the planet
Astronaut photography benefiting the planet
When astronauts take photographs of our planet while orbiting 400 km above our heads, they are doing much more than just taking pretty pictures. They are looking after the health of our planet and, ultimately, us too. Techniques used by astrophotographers looking at the stars and space exploration come together to measure the environmental impact of artificial lights at night.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.02.2019
Joshua Wallach: meta-researcher, Beatles fan, pizza connoisseur
Joshua Wallach: Meta-researcher, Beatles fan, pizza connoisseur  The Yale School of Public Health proudly welcomes a large number of new tenure track faculty joining us this academic year. These individuals have widely varied interests and excel in research, scholarship, innovation and teaching. They complement and expand the expertise already available at the School of Public Health and will be instrumental in addressing many of the health challenges of the 21 st  century.
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