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Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Largest public database on genetic variants that regulate colonic gene expression
Largest public database on genetic variants that regulate colonic gene expression
A collaboration between Catalan and American researchers has resulted in the largest public databank known to date on data about gene expression and colonic genetic variants.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.04.2021
Worm infections leave African women more vulnerable to STIs
Worm infections leave African women more vulnerable to STIs
Intestinal worm infections can leave women in sub-Saharan Africa more vulnerable to sexually-transmitted viral infections, a new study reveals. The rate and severity of sexually-transmitted viral infections (STI) in the region are very high, as are those of worm infections, which when caught in the intestine can change immunity in other parts of the body.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.04.2021
'All-in-One' Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
’All-in-One’ Technique that Could Accelerate Phage-Therapy Diagnosis
Lensless Imaging System Affirms Phage Therapy's Value in Treating Serious Infection, Tracks Phage Resistance and Could Easily Be Implemented in Compact Devices at Phage Labs GRENOBLE, France - April 13, 2021 - A team of French and Swiss scientists has demonstrated a lensless imaging technique that could easily be implemented in cost-effective and compact devices in phage laboratories to accelerate phage-therapy diagnosis.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2021
Is it Possible to Slow Down Age-Related Memory Loss?
A team of researchers from Berlin, Dortmund, and Graz are investigating how the substance spermidine can protect aging brain cells. No 062/2021 from Apr 13, 2021 According to a recent study, age-related memory loss may be preventable. Researchers from Freie Universität Berlin, the NeuroCure Cluster of Excellence, the Leibniz-Institut für Analytische Wissenschaften (ISAS) in Dortmund, and the University of Graz found that the substance spermidine - something that is present in all human cells - can protect the mitochondria found in aging brain cells.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.04.2021
When two worlds meet: a protease that controls small RNA activity
When two worlds meet: a protease that controls small RNA activity
The protection of genome integrity of germ cells is essential for animal fertility. Researchers from the Grosshans group characterized a defense mechanism against selfish genetic elements in the C. elegans germline. They identified a protein processing mechanism that controls the activity of small RNAs to achieve specific silencing of transposons while sparing endogenous genes.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 13.04.2021
Joyful Screams Perceived More Strongly than Screams of Fear or Anger
The human scream signals more than fear of imminent danger or entanglement in social conflicts. Screaming can also express joy or excitement. For the first time, researchers at the University of Zurich have demonstrated that non-alarming screams are even perceived and processed by the brain more efficiently than their alarming counterparts.

Life Sciences - 12.04.2021
New Jurassic flying reptile reveals the oldest opposed thumb
New Jurassic flying reptile reveals the oldest opposed thumb
A new 160-million-year-old arboreal pterosaur species, dubbed 'Monkeydactyl', has the oldest true opposed thumb - a novel structure previously not known in pterosaurs. An international team of researchers from China, Brazil, UK, Denmark and Japan have described a new Jurassic pterosaur Kunpengopterus antipollicatus, which was discovered in the Tiaojishan Formation of Liaoning, China.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 12.04.2021
Unusual fossil reveals last meal of prehistoric pollinator
Unusual fossil reveals last meal of prehistoric pollinator
An amber fossil of a Cretaceous beetle has shed some light on the diet of one of the earliest pollinators of flowering plants. The animal's remains were unearthed by researchers at the University of Bristol and the Nanjing Institute of Geology and Palaeontology of the Chinese Academy of Sciences (NIGPAS) who were able to study its fossil faecal matter, which was composed solely of pollen.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.04.2021
Postnatal molecular changes associated with the fetal inflammatory response have been identified in extremely preterm newborns
The molecular changes observed after birth reveal for the first time a postnatal alteration of adaptive immunity in extremely preterm newborns affected by fetal inflammatory response before birth. A new study provides the largest catalogue to date of postnatal molecular changes associated with the fetal inflammatory response in extremely preterm newborns.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.04.2021
Researchers call for greater awareness of unintended consequences of CRISPR gene editing
Researchers call for greater awareness of unintended consequences of CRISPR gene editing
CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing can lead to unintended mutations at the targeted section of DNA in early human embryos, researchers have revealed. This highlights the need for further research into the effects of CRISPR-Cas9 genome editing, especially when used to edit human DNA in laboratory research. We and others are trying to develop and refine the tools to assess these complex mutations.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.04.2021
Rice, Baylor part of research effort to advance genome editing
Rice, Baylor part of research effort to advance genome editing
Somatic Cell Genome Editing Consortium funded by NIH By MOLLY CHIU Special to the Rice News Researchers from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine are part of a national effort to accelerate genome-editing research and develop gene-editing technologies and therapies. The goals and planned activities of the Somatic Cell Genome Editing Consortium ( SCGE ) were described in a paper published in Nature by more than 70 principal investigators on 45 SCGE projects funded by the National Institutes of Health.

Environment - Life Sciences - 09.04.2021
We don't know how most mammals will respond to climate change
We don’t know how most mammals will respond to climate change
Researchers at the University of Oxford, alongside international collaborators, have found that there is a significant knowledge gap in the risks posed by climate change to mammals. In their systematic review, published in the Journal of Animal Ecology, the scientists identify that there are significant blanks about the risks to mammals in regions most vulnerable to climate change, including boreal and tropic areas.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Understudied Mutations Have Big Impact on Gene Expression
Variable number tandem repeats modulate genes associated with Alzheimer's disease, obesity, cancer and other conditions An international team of researchers led by computer scientists at the University of California San Diego have identified 163 variable number tandem repeats (VNTRs) that actively regulate gene expression.

Health - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
Urolithin A shows effective against muscular dystrophy
A new study published in Science Translational Medicine by EPFL professor Johan Auwerx and scientists from EPFL start-up Amazentis highlights the effectiveness of mitophagy-stimulating molecule Urolithin A in mice to cure a disease similar to Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. And points to a possible treatment for affected people.

Environment - Life Sciences - 08.04.2021
Illuminating a sea turtle mystery
Illuminating a sea turtle mystery
North Pacific loggerhead turtles' years-long oceanic journeys remain poorly understood. Using data from satellite tracking and other techniques, scientists reveal a unique phenomenon that may explain the endangered migrants' pathway. By Rob Jordan Stanford Woods Institute for the Environment "Not all those who wander are lost...

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 08.04.2021
Modern Human Brain Originated in Africa Around 1.7 Million Years Ago
Modern Human Brain Originated in Africa Around 1.7 Million Years Ago
The human brain as we know it today is relatively young. It evolved about 1.7 million years ago when the culture of stone tools in Africa became increasingly complex. A short time later, the new Homo populations spread to Southeast Asia, researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown using computed tomography analyses of fossilized skulls.

Life Sciences - Health - 08.04.2021
Leaking calcium in neurons an early sign of Alzheimer’s pathology
Alzheimer's disease is known for its slow attack on neurons crucial to memory and cognition.  But why are these particular neurons in aging brains so susceptible to the disease's ravages, while others remain resilient? In a new study published April 8 in the journal Alzheimer's & Dementia, The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association , researchers at the Yale School of Medicine found that susceptible neurons in the prefrontal cortex develop a "leak" in calcium storage with advancing age.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.04.2021
Face, brain development share many genes
Researchers at Stanford and KU Leuven have identified more than 70 genes that affect variation in both brain and facial structure. The genes don't influence cognitive ability, further debunking beliefs that intelligence can be assessed by facial features. Even when you assume your best poker face, you reveal something about what's in your head, according to a new study by researchers at Stanford Medicine and KU Leuven , a university in Belgium.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 07.04.2021
Using AI to Diagnose Neurological Diseases Based on Motor Impairment
New Heidelberg approach: analysing movement patterns through machine learning The way we move says a lot about the state of our brain. While normal motor behaviour points to a healthy brain function, deviations can indicate impairments owing to neurological diseases. The observation and evaluation of movement patterns is therefore part of basic research, and is likewise one of the most important instruments for non-invasive diagnostics in clinical applications.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.04.2021
The Incredible Bacterial 'Homing Missiles' That Scientists Want to Harness
The Incredible Bacterial ’Homing Missiles’ That Scientists Want to Harness
A Berkeley Lab-led team is digging into the bizarre bacteria-produced nanomachines that could fast-track microbiome science Imagine there are arrows that are lethal when fired on your enemies yet harmless if they fall on your friends. It's easy to see how these would be an amazing advantage in warfare, if they were real.
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