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Astronomy / Space Science - Life Sciences - 02.12.2022
Building blocks of life would be technically detectable in our solar system
Researchers at Freie Universität Berlin Publish Study in the Journal Astrobiology. In the future, space missions would be at least technically capable of detecting DNA, lipids, and other components of bacteria on ocean moons in our solar system - if such building blocks of life exist outside Earth. This has now been demonstrated in laboratory experiments by an international team led by scientists from the Planetary Science and Remote Sensing Research Group at Freie Universität Berlin.

Health - Life Sciences - 02.12.2022
Droplets in cells determine the accumulation of proteins in age-related diseases
Tiny droplets in our cells can accelerate the accumulation of protein deposits in diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease, but they can also hinder this accumulation. While they will worsen the accumulation if the proteins stick to the edge of the droplets, the situation actually improves when they are incorporated into the droplets.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.12.2022
ASD: Towards a Better Understanding of the Molecular Mechanisms of Autism
ASD: Towards a Better Understanding of the Molecular Mechanisms of Autism
While great progress has been made in recent years in the understanding of autism spectrum disorder (ASD), its underlying molecular mechanisms remain fairly poorly documented.

Life Sciences - 01.12.2022
Seeing the world through baby eyes
Seeing the world through baby eyes
New study shows how babies order visual perceptual impressions While adults sort visual impressions at lightning speed, babies have to learn this first. This ability is important for finding their way in everyday life. Until now, it was unclear whether visual perception in the brains of babies is fundamentally different from that of adults before language acquisition.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 01.12.2022
Researchers test promising tech treatment for youth depression
New research shows promising results using neurotechnological approaches to treat depression in youth. The research, led by Simon Fraser University (SFU) professor Faranak Farzan, is published in the Journal of Affective Disorders Reports. Researchers investigated the clinical and neurophysiological effects of using brain stimulation followed by cognitive exercise for treating Major Depressive Disorder (MDD) in 26 youth (aged 16 - 24 years old).

Health - Life Sciences - 01.12.2022
Australian public strongly supports DNA screening for risk of medically actionable conditions: study
Nine in 10 Australians would participate in preventive DNA screening for risk of medically actionable conditions, a new national survey has found. Published in the Journal of Medical Genetics , the Monash University-led survey results come as a world-first Australian DNA screening program for some cancers and heart disease called DNA Screen recently attracted more than 20,000 volunteers in its first week.

Health - Life Sciences - 01.12.2022
Anti-ageing drug rapamycin might only benefit females
Anti-ageing drug rapamycin might only benefit females
The anti-ageing drug rapamycin only prolongs the lifespan of female fruit flies, but not that of males, finds a new study co-led by UCL researchers. Working with researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Biology of Ageing in Cologne, the team reports in Nature Aging that in addition, rapamycin only slowed the development of age-related pathological changes in the gut in female flies.

Life Sciences - Health - 01.12.2022
Early life experiences can have long-lasting impact on genes
Early life experiences can have long-lasting impact on genes
Early life experiences can impact the activity of our genes much later on and even affect longevity, finds a new study in fruit flies led by UCL researchers. In the study published in Nature Aging , the scientists report that gene expression 'memory' can persist across the lifespan, and may present a novel target for improving late-life health.

Life Sciences - 01.12.2022
How touch dampens the brain’s response to painful stimuli
Rubbing an aching body part can bring some relief. Neuroscientists at MIT's McGovern Institute are looking to find out why. When we press our temples to soothe an aching head or rub an elbow after an unexpected blow, it often brings some relief. It is believed that pain-responsive cells in the brain quiet down when these neurons also receive touch inputs, say scientists at MIT's McGovern Institute for Brain Research, who for the first time have watched this phenomenon play out in the brains of mice.

Life Sciences - Environment - 30.11.2022
Large terrestrial mammals are more vulnerable to the acoustic impact of drones than to the visual impact
Large terrestrial mammals are more vulnerable to the acoustic impact of drones than to the visual impact
Large terrestrial mammals are vulnerable to the acoustic sounds of drones, technological systems which are increasingly used to study the wildlife in open habitats such as the savanna and marshes.

Life Sciences - Physics - 30.11.2022
The junction is the key
The junction is the key
Researchers decrypt transport dynamics of porous media What laws govern how chemicals pass through filters? How do droplets of oil move through layers of stone? How do blood cells travel through a living organism? A team of researchers led by the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization (MPI-DS) has discovered how pore space geometry impacts transport of substances through fluids.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.11.2022
Organic cation transporters: study provides insights for the first time
Monoamines are neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems and they also transmit signals between cells and the brain. This transmission is followed by their reuptake into the cells by means of transporters. While the specific monoamine transporters have already been well studied, not enough is known about the organic cation transporters, which are high-capacity monoamine transporters.

Health - Life Sciences - 30.11.2022
Important discovery could help extinguish disease threat to koalas
Important discovery could help extinguish disease threat to koalas
University of Queensland virologists are a step closer to understanding a mysterious AIDS-like virus that is impacting koala populations differently across state lines. Dr Michaela Blyton Associate Professor Keith Chappell from the Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology (AIBN) a School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences , have uncovered another piece of the puzzle in their quest to halt the koala retrovirus known as KoRV - a condition strongly associated with diseases that cause infertility and blindness.

Life Sciences - 30.11.2022
Silent synapses are abundant in the adult brain
Silent synapses are abundant in the adult brain
These immature connections may explain how the adult brain is able to form new memories and absorb new information. MIT neuroscientists have discovered that the adult brain contains millions of "silent synapses" - immature connections between neurons that remain inactive until they're recruited to help form new memories.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 29.11.2022
COPD patients have a higher risk of brain problems, possibly due to inflammation
Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) have a higher chance of suffering from brain-related problems such as anxiety, depression and memory problems. PhD candidate Charlotte Pelgrim discovered that inflammation in the brain and a less protective barrier of the blood vessels in the brain may play a role.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
Why do overweight people get diseases more often?
Why do overweight people get diseases more often?
Size of fat cells can cause metabolic diseases If you gain weight, the fat cells grow with you. In cases of severe obesity, the cells are usually greatly enlarged. Researchers at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now been able to show how enlarged fat cells can cause metabolic diseases. In addition, they have developed examination methods to determine the fat cell size of humans non-invasively.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
Dormant microbes can ’switch on’ to cope with climate change
Dormant strains of bacteria that have previously adapted to cope with certain temperatures are switched back on during climatic change, study shows. The results, led by a team at Imperial College London and published today in eLife , have important implications for predicting the impact of global warming on ecosystems.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
New study suggests climate change may be affecting animal body size
New study suggests climate change may be affecting animal body size
A new study finds treeshrews increase in size in warmer settings, contrary to established norms. Our study is the first to demonstrate a rule reversal over time in any species. We need to revisit some of our assumptions about size variation as our climate continues to rapidly change. Maya Juman New evidence shows that some mammals increase in size in warmer settings, upsetting established norms and suggesting that climate change may be having an unexpected impact on animal body size.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
Better Than a Hole in the Head
Just as blood pressure informs heart health, intracranial pressure (ICP) helps indicate brain health. ICP sensing is the burgeoning focus of Jana Kainerstorfer 's biomedical optics lab at Carnegie Mellon University. Her team is working to modernize ICP sensing approaches, which historically have been invasive and risky.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.11.2022
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size evolution
An ecological rule breaker shows the effects of climate change on body size evolution
Does evolution follow certain rules? Can these rules be predicted? Southeast Asia's tree shrews break multiple rules when it comes to body size variation - with an unexpected twist - according to researchers from McGill University, University of Cambridge, and Yale University. The findings shed new light on the effects of climate change on the evolution of body size in animals.
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