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Life Sciences - Environment - 10:36
Krill’s role in global climate should inform fishing policy in Antarctica
Krill ' small crustaceans eaten by whales, seals and penguins ' play a vital role in removing carbon from the atmosphere, according to a new study. A study on how krill affect the Southern Ocean's ability to take in carbon from the atmosphere and bury it on the seafloor has revealed the small crustaceans play an outsized role in the process.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
New clinical research offers possibility of future rehabilitation for patients in vegetative and minimally conscious states
Non-invasive brain stimulation is to be trialed for the first time alongside advanced brain imaging techniques in patients who are minimally conscious or in a vegetative state. The study builds on promising results from the Centre for Human Brain Health at the University of Birmingham which suggested that non-invasive brain stimulation can improve the success of rehabilitation for non-responsive patients.

Life Sciences - 18.10.2019
Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked 'fabella' knee bone
Region, age, and sex decide who gets arthritis-linked ’fabella’ knee bone
The once-rare 'fabella' bone has made a dramatic resurgence in human knees, but who's likely to have a fabella or two - and why? Fabellae aren't formed by knee-jerk reactions to either genetics or environment alone. Dr Michael Berthaume Department of Bioengineering Led by Dr Michael Berthaume at Imperial College London, a new meta-analysis has found that the mystery knee bone is more common in older people, more often found in men than women, and in people in Asia.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.10.2019
Stress test separates tough bacteria from the tender
By scooping the guts out of bacteria and refilling them with an expansive fluid, scientists can discover whether a microbe is structurally strong or weak, gaining insights that could help fight infectious diseases or aid studies of the beneficial bacterial communities known as microbiomes. Bacteria. Sometimes we can't live with 'em, but there's a growing appreciation that we can't live without 'em.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 17.10.2019
How roots grow hair
How roots grow hair
The roots of plants can do a lot of things: They grow in length to reach water, they can bend to circumvent stones, and they form fine root hairs enabling them to absorb more nutrients from the soil. A team of researchers led by scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now identified an important regulator of this process.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.10.2019
EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
EPFL is developing next-generation soft hearing implants
Working with clinicians from Massachusetts Eye and Ear and Harvard Medical School, a team of EPFL researchers has developed a conformable electrode implant that will allow people with a dysfunctional inner ear to hear again. This new device could replace existing auditory brainstem implants, which have a number of shortcomings.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.10.2019
Shows why even well-controlled epilepsy can disrupt thinking
Transient bursts of high-frequency electrical activity in epileptic brain tissue can impair cognition even when no seizure is occurring, Stanford scientists have found. A study by Stanford University School of Medicine investigators may help explain why even people benefiting from medications for their epilepsy often continue to experience bouts of difficulty thinking, perceiving and remembering clearly.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2019
Focuses on repair and reversal of damage caused by Huntington’s disease
A new study examining the role that star-shaped brain cells called astrocytes play in Huntington's disease has identified a potential strategy that may halt the disease and repair some of the damage it causes. Astrocytes interact with and support neurons, or nerve cells, and other brain cells. Although astrocytes outnumber neurons, little is known about how they interact with synapses, the junctions between neurons that enable them to communicate and convey messages to each other.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 16.10.2019
Computational "Match Game" Identifies Potential Antibiotics
CMU software tool speeds discovery using microbial datasets Computational biologists at Carnegie Mellon University have devised a software tool that can play a high-speed "Match Game" to identify bioactive molecules and the microbial genes that produce them so they can be evaluated as possible antibiotics and other therapeutic agents.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.10.2019
Important species interactions can destabilize aquatic ecosystems in response to nutrient inputs
Important species interactions can destabilize aquatic ecosystems in response to nutrient inputs
Ecosystems provide numerous benefits, supplying food, clean water and other resources. So, it is vital that ecosystem stability is maintained in the face of disturbances such as drought, heatwaves or nutrient inputs. Nutrient inputs can be particularly problematic in aquatic ecosystems if they lead to algal blooms.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.10.2019
Raw Meat-Based Diets for Pets Pose a Health Risk for Humans
Multidrug-resistant bacteria are found in half of all dog foods made from raw meat, researchers from the University of Zurich have found. Feeding pets a diet of raw meat, also known as a "BARF" diet, is a growing trend. The resistant bacteria in the raw food can be transmitted to the pets - and thus also to humans.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.10.2019
Antibody eradicates leukemia stem cells
The introduction of the drug imatinib in 2001 revolutionized the treatment of a type of cancer called chronic myelogenous leukemia. In more than 80% of people with CML who received the drug, the disease went into complete remission. However, in most people with chronic myelogenous leukemia, cancerous stem cells remain in the body for years after their cancer has gone into remission.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Cell family trees tracked to discover their role in tissue scarring and liver disease
Researchers have discovered that a key cell type involved in liver injury and cancer consists of two cellular families with different origins and functions. The research by academics from the Universities of Edinburgh and Bristol and funded by the Wellcome Trust and Medical Research Council, is published today [Tuesday 15 October] .

Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
Piranha fish swap old teeth for new simultaneously
A CT-scanned image of the piranha Serrasalmus medinai. Note the ingested fish fins in its stomach. University of Washington Piranha fish have a powerful bite. Their teeth help them shred through the flesh of their prey or even scrape plants off rocks to supplement their diet. Years ago, scientists discovered that piranhas lose all of the teeth on one side of their mouth at once and regrow them, presumably to replace dulled teeth with brand new sharp spears for gnawing on prey.

Life Sciences - 15.10.2019
The Brain Does not Follow the Head
The Brain Does not Follow the Head
The human brain is about three times the size of the brains of great apes. This has to do, among other things, with the evolution of novel brain structures that enabled complex behaviors such as language and tool production. A study by anthropologists at the University of Zurich now shows that changes in the brain occurred independent of evolutionary rearrangements of the braincase.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
Tissue damage caused by a heart attack to be reduced by 30%?
Tissue damage caused by a heart attack to be reduced by 30%?
Scientists from the Universities of Geneva and Lyon have discovered which molecule is held responsible for tissue necrosis due to an infarctus, and how to reduce the tissue damage by 30% in mice. Each year, heart attacks kill almost 10 million people in the world, and more than 6 million die from stroke.

Life Sciences - 14.10.2019
Investing in love and affection pays off for species that mate for life
The males of species that form long-lasting pair-bonds, like many birds, often continue to make elaborate displays of plumage, colors and dances after they mate with a female. While their time and energy might be better spent taking care of their offspring, these displays also encourage the female to invest more of their energy into the brood.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.10.2019
Scientists help immune system find hidden cancer cells
Cancer cells are masters at avoiding detection, but a new system developed by Yale scientists can make them stand out from the crowd and help the immune system spot and eliminate tumors that other forms of immunotherapies might miss, the researchers report Oct. 14 Immunology. The new system reduced or eliminated melanoma and triple-negative breast and pancreatic tumors in mice, even those located far from the primary tumor source, the researchers report.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.10.2019
Conclusive sighting of rare whale confirmed
Conclusive sighting of rare whale confirmed
The first conclusive evidence of a rare whale species - the True's beaked whale (Mesoplodon mirus) - inhabiting a region of the North East Atlantic has been confirmed by a research team involving UCL. Images taken during a wildlife photography trip in the Bay of Biscay in July 2018 have given conservationists the opportunity to study this species in exquisite new detail.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 14.10.2019
Fishing for the triple bottom line: profit, planet - and people
Fisheries managers typically strive to strike a delicate balance between two, often competing, types of needs: the needs for fishermen's profits and the needs for the planet. But in 1994, entrepreneur John Elkington posited that true sustainability requires consideration of a third "P" - the needs of the people.
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