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Life Sciences - 13:08
Scientists uncover a gene involved in sexual conflict in fruit flies
Sexual conflict in fruit flies is governed by specifically wired neurons in the brain which have been pinpointed by scientists at the University of Birmingham, UK. The research uncovers a gene directing development of these neurons and sheds new light on how certain behaviours - in this case sexual behaviours - are 'hardwired' into the brain.

Innovation - Life Sciences - 12:08
New tool can identify harmful blue-green algae
A new way to detect early signs of harmful blue-green algae, which bloom in lakes, rivers and reservoirs around the world, has been developed by researchers at the University of Birmingham together with researchers at the Culture Collection of Algae & Protozoa (CCAP), based at the Scottish Association of Marine Science.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.10.2021
Savannah chimpanzees, a model for the understanding of human evolution
Savannah chimpanzees, a model for the understanding of human evolution
To prosper, most great apes need lush forests in Africa (bonobos, chimpanzees, and gorillas) or Southeast Asia (orangutans), except for some groups of chimpanzees that live in savannahs, habitats characterised by high temperatures and very low seasonal rainfall. Adriana Hernández, Serra Hunter professor at the Faculty of Psychology of the University of Barcelona, co-led the study conducted by an international team of primatologists who reviewed the existing research on the behaviour and ecology of savannah chimpanzees to understand how these apes adapt to extreme conditions.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.10.2021
New values for better diagnoses
New values for better diagnoses
MHH study develops reference tool for blood tests Lymphocytes belong to the white blood cells. They consist of several subgroups with different tasks in immune defence. Which and how many lymphocytes are in the blood provides information about our current state of health as well as congenital or acquired immune deficiencies.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 19.10.2021
Largest ever global study of tuberculosis identifies genetic causes of drug resistance
Using cutting-edge genomic sequencing techniques, researchers at the University of Oxford have identified almost all the genomic variation that gives people resistance to 13 of the most common tuberculosis (TB) drug treatments. The Comprehensive Resistance Prediction for Tuberculosis International Consortium (CRyPTIC) research project has collected the largest ever global dataset of clinical M. tuberculosis samples from across the world consisting of 15,211 samples from 27 countries on five continents.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.10.2021
DNA tangles can help predict evolution of mutations
DNA tangles can help predict evolution of mutations
Researchers from the Milner Centre for Evolution have identified evolutionary hotspots in DNA where mutations are more likely. Last updated on Tuesday 19 October 2021 Tangles in unwound DNA can create mutational hotspots in the genomes of bacteria, according to a new study by the Milner Centre for Evolution at the University of Bath.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.10.2021
The human immune system is an early riser
The human immune system is an early riser
Swiss and German scientists show that activation of the immune system oscillates throughout the day, with a peak just before the start of the day. Circadian clocks, which regulate most of the physiological processes of living beings over a rhythm of about 24 hours, are one of the most fundamental biological mechanisms.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2021
New active agent against parasites
New active agent against parasites
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have identified a chemical compound that may be suitable as an active agent against several different unicellular parasites. Among these are the pathogens that cause malaria and toxoplasmosis. The point of attack for this promising substance is the protein tubulin: It helps cells divide and therefore is essential for the multiplication of the parasites.

Life Sciences - 18.10.2021
Genetic risk for clinical depression linked to physical symptoms
People with higher genetic risk of clinical depression are more likely to have physical symptoms such as chronic pain, fatigue and migraine, University of Queensland researchers have found. Dr Enda Byrne from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience said depression was a serious disorder with lifetime risks of poor health.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.10.2021
So-called junk DNA plays critical role in mammalian development
Viral elements called transposons have invaded mammalian genomes for millions of years and currently make up nearly half the DNA in the genomes of all living mammals. The image depicts species-specific transposon integrations as unique events in the evolutionary history of each species. (UC Berkeley image by Kerry Lin) Nearly half of our DNA has been written off as junk, the discards of evolution: sidelined or broken genes, viruses that got stuck in our genome and were dismembered or silenced, none of it relevant to the human organism or human evolution.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.10.2021
How the microbiome affects human health, explained
The term "microbiome" is shorthand for the vast and still largely unexplored worlds of bacteria, viruses, fungi and other microorganisms that inhabit every corner of the planet. Bacteria form tiny ecosystems side by side with our own cells on our skin, in our mouths and along our airways and digestive tracts, as well as on all the surfaces we interact with-including our homes, workplaces, and hospitals, and the air, water, and soil.

Environment - Life Sciences - 15.10.2021
Plankton head polewards
Ocean warming caused by anthropogenic greenhouse-gas emissions will prompt many species of marine plankton to seek out new habitats, in some cases as a matter of sur-vival. researchers expect many organisms to head to the poles and form new communities - with unforeseeable consequences for marine food webs.

Life Sciences - Health - 14.10.2021
A rapid mechanism for muscle self-repair independent of stem cells
Researchers led by Pura Muñoz-Cánoves, ICREA professor and principal investigator at UPF and the CNIC, describe a new mechanism for muscle repair after physiological damage relying on the rearrangement of muscle fibre nuclei, and independently of muscle stem cells. This protective mechanism paves the way to a broader understanding of muscle repair in physiology and disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.10.2021
Delhi outbreak highlights challenge of herd immunity in the face of Delta variant | University of Cambridge
Delhi outbreak highlights challenge of herd immunity in the face of Delta variant | University of Cambridge
The severe outbreak of COVID-19 in Delhi, India, in 2021 showed not only that the Delta variant of SARS-CoV2 is extremely transmissible but that it can infect individuals previously infected by a different variant of the coronavirus, say a team of international scientists writing in Science .

Health - Life Sciences - 14.10.2021
Severe Delhi outbreak highlights challenge of reaching herd immunity in face of Delta variant | University of Cambridge
Severe Delhi outbreak highlights challenge of reaching herd immunity in face of Delta variant | University of Cambridge
The severe outbreak of COVID-19 in Delhi, India, in 2021 showed not only that the Delta variant of SARS-CoV2 is extremely transmissible but that it can infect individuals previously infected by a different variant of the coronavirus, say a team of international scientists writing in Science .

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.10.2021
Tree-dwelling mammals survived after asteroid strike destroyed forests | University of Cambridge
Tree-dwelling mammals survived after asteroid strike destroyed forests | University of Cambridge
An asteroid strike 66 million years ago wiped out the non-avian dinosaurs and devastated the Earth's forests, but tree-dwelling ancestors of primates may have survived it, according to a new study published in the journal Ecology and Evolution . The recovery of terrestrial vertebrate life following the end-Cretaceous asteroid impact was one of the most important events in the history of life on Earth Daniel Field Overall, the study supports the h

Computer Science - Life Sciences - 14.10.2021
Deep-learning-based image analysis is now just a click away
Researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Instituto de Investigación Sanitaria Gregorio Marañón (IiSGM), and collaborators in Switzerland and Sweden, have developed a tool, called deepImageJ. The tools processes and analyses using models based on artificial intelligence biomedical images (for example, acquired with microscopes or radiological scanners), improving their quality or identifying and classifying specific elements in them, among other tasks.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.10.2021
Lateral flow tests detect most people at risk of transmitting Covid-19
Lateral flow tests are more accurate than previously reported and cannot be compared directly to how PCR tests work, finds a new paper led by UCL researchers. The peer-reviewed paper, published today in Clinical Epidemiology, uses a new formula to show that lateral flow tests (LFTs) are likely more than 80% effective at detecting any level of Covid-19 infection and likely more than 90% effective at detecting those who are most infectious when using the test.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.10.2021
Research briefs: Heartbeats to music, motivation and stress, and COVID-19 vaccines
Health Rhythms of music and heartbeats When you listen to or perform music, you may notice that you move your body in time with the music. You may also synchronise to music in ways that you may not be aware of, such as your heartbeats. Scientists from McGill, led by Caroline Palmer , the Canada Research Chair in Cognitive Neuroscience of Performance, investigated how musicians' heart rhythms change when they perform familiar and unfamiliar piano melodies at different times of day.

Life Sciences - Physics - 14.10.2021
How bacteria create a piggy bank for the lean times
IMAGE CAPTION: Cyanophycin biosynthesis looks like a windshield wiper in action: one domain is responsible for adding aspartate (Asp), a second domain is responsible for adding arginine (Arg), two nitrogen-rich amino acids, and the third domain holds on to the growing chain of cyanophycin. CREDIT: Schmeing lab Bacteria can store extra resources for the lean times.
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