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Microtechnics - Life Sciences - 24.05.2024
Imperceptible sensors made from 'electronic spider silk' can be printed directly on human skin
Imperceptible sensors made from ’electronic spider silk’ can be printed directly on human skin
Researchers have developed a method to make adaptive and eco-friendly sensors that can be directly and imperceptibly printed onto a wide range of biological surfaces, whether that's a finger or a flower petal. The method, developed by researchers from the University of Cambridge, takes its inspiration from spider silk, which can conform and stick to a range of surfaces.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.05.2024
Physical frailty may put people at greater risk of depression
The findings of a new Yale study suggest physical frailty may be a risk factor for depression - and a target for intervention. Individuals who meet at least one of the criteria for physical frailty are at higher risk of also developing depression, a new Yale study finds. The findings - which also include insights into the specific inflammatory molecules and changes in brain structure that could underlie this association between frailty and depression - point to a need for routine assessment of physical frailty in clinical practice, researchers said.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.05.2024
Sequencing of the developing human brain uncovers hundreds of thousands of new gene transcripts
New study could improve the ability to make genetic diagnoses and treat neurodevelopmental disorders Health + Behavior New study could improve the ability to make genetic diagnoses and treat neurodevelopmental disorders Key takeaways Regulation of isoforms - varied versions of RNA and proteins that can be produced from a single gene - is a critical tool in understanding brain development and genetic risk for neuropsychiatric disorders.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 23.05.2024
New Insights Into the Evolution of the Prion Protein
New Insights Into the Evolution of the Prion Protein
A study from Bochum describes a mammal-specific domain of the prion protein and offers new approaches for research into neurodegenerative diseases. At first, they cause memory deficits and difficulties in walking, finally they inhibit elementary motor skills and destroy basic brain functions: Prion diseases are progressive and invariably fatal neurodegenerative diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.05.2024
Mechanobiology exerts creative pressure
Mechanobiology exerts creative pressure
Numerous cellular phenomena are guided by mechanical forces, such as embryonic development or the spread of metastases. These phenomena are the subject of intense research aimed at understanding how they are translated into biological processes. Particular emphasis is being placed on new opportunities to treat diseases as resistant as cancer or fibrosis.

Life Sciences - 23.05.2024
Excavation reveals ’major’ ancient migration to Timor Island
The discovery of thousands of stone artefacts and animal bones in a deep cave on Timor Island has led archaeologists to reassess the route that early humans took to reach Australia. Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU), Flinders University, University College London (UCL) and the ARC Centre of Excellence for Australian Biodiversity and Heritage dated and analysed the artefacts and sediment at the Laili rock shelter in central-north Timor-Leste, north of Australia, to pinpoint the arrival of the colonists.

Life Sciences - 23.05.2024
Study explains why the brain can robustly recognize images, even without color
Study explains why the brain can robustly recognize images, even without color
The findings also reveal why identifying objects in black-and-white images is more difficult for individuals who were born blind and had their sight restored. Even though the human visual system has sophisticated machinery for processing color, the brain has no problem recognizing objects in black-and-white images.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.05.2024
Understanding why autism symptoms sometimes improve amid fever
With support from The Marcus Foundation, an MIT neuroscientist and a Harvard Medical School immunologist will study the "fever effect" in an effort to devise therapies that mimic its beneficial effects. Scientists are catching up to what parents and other caregivers have been reporting for many years: When some people with autism spectrum disorders experience an infection that sparks a fever, their autism-related symptoms seem to improve.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.05.2024
Tracking the cellular and genetic roots of neuropsychiatric disease
Tracking the cellular and genetic roots of neuropsychiatric disease
A new study of nearly 400 human brains links genetic variants to genes and cell types, which could help enable precision-medicine for neuropsychiatric disease. A new analysis has revealed detailed information about genetic variation in brain cells that could open new avenues for the targeted treatment of diseases such as schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.05.2024
Sea of love: Behind the unusual sexual parasitism of deep-water anglerfish
Sea of love: Behind the unusual sexual parasitism of deep-water anglerfish
A new study illuminates the evolution of deep-sea anglerfish with a focus on the development of their unique (and somewhat unsettling) mating routine. As the planet's most expansive ecosystem, the deep sea can be a tough place to find a mate. Though, scientists say, some deep-sea anglerfishes evolved a unique method of reproduction that ensures that once they land a partner in the vast open waters, they remain latched for life.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 22.05.2024
Hallucinogenic mushrooms to treat alcohol addiction
Hallucinogenic mushrooms to treat alcohol addiction
A ground-breaking study conducted by INSERM's Groupe de Recherches sur l'Alcool et les Pharmacodépendances (GRAP) opens up new therapeutic perspectives for the treatment of alcohol addiction with psilocybin, the active compound in hallucinogenic mushrooms. Published in the scientific journal Brain , their work confirms the potential of psilocybin to combat alcohol addiction, while shedding light on the molecule's hitherto unknown mechanisms of action.

Life Sciences - 22.05.2024
Finding the beat of collective animal motion
Finding the beat of collective animal motion
Virtual Reality experiments have illuminated the rhythmic glue that could keep animals moving in synchrony Across nature, animals from swarming insects to herding mammals can organize into seemingly choreographed motion. Over the last two decades, scientists have discovered that these coordinated movements arise from each animal following simple rules about where their neighbors are located.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2024
Tracking down rare hereditary diseases
Tracking down rare hereditary diseases
Dynamic structure of FLVCR proteins and their function in nutrient transport in our cells revealed It is known that malfunctions of the proteins FLVCR1 and FLVCR2 lead to rare hereditary diseases in humans that cause motor, sensory and neurological disorders. However, the biochemical mechanisms behind this and the physiological functions of the FLVCR proteins have been unclear to date.

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.05.2024
Australian study proves 'humans are planet's most frightening predator'
Australian study proves ’humans are planet’s most frightening predator’
Australia lacks fearsome large carnivores like lions and wolves, and the relative lack of fear that marsupials like kangaroos and wallabies show to dogs (and other introduced carnivores) has been attributed to a lack of evolutionary experience with large mammalian predators.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 22.05.2024
The double face of fentanyl: the neuronal basis of opioid addiction
The double face of fentanyl: the neuronal basis of opioid addiction
Scientists from the University of Geneva have discovered that fentanyl leads to the activation of two distinct cell populations in the brain, first when the drug is taken and then during withdrawal, suggesting a novel model for opioid addiction. Fentanyl is a particularly powerful synthetic opioid. Diverted from its original medical use, it has become a deadly drug responsible for three-quarters of overdose deaths in the United States.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.05.2024
Adhesive coatings can prevent scarring around medical implants
New adhesive hydrogel coatings could prolong the lifespan of pacemakers, drug delivery depots, and other medical devices. When medical devices such as pacemakers are implanted in the body, they usually provoke an immune response that leads to buildup of scar tissue around the implant. This scarring, known as fibrosis, can interfere with the devices' function and may require them to be removed.

Life Sciences - Health - 22.05.2024
Scientists learn how to control muscles with light
Scientists learn how to control muscles with light
A new study suggests optogenetics can drive muscle contraction with greater control and less fatigue than electrical stimulation. For people with paralysis or amputation, neuroprosthetic systems that artificially stimulate muscle contraction with electrical current can help them regain limb function.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 21.05.2024
Chemists Use Nucleic Acid Binding Dyes as Photocatalysts for ATRP
Researchers in Carnegie Mellon University's  Department of Chemistry  have developed a nucleic-acid-based photocatalyst that can precisely control atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP), a popular method used to generate a wide range of materials with highly specific, tailored functionalities. The novel approach took something old - fluorescent dyes that bind to nucleic acids - and turned it into something new - a versatile photocatalyst that allows for precise control over the polymerization reaction.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.05.2024
How immune cells recognize the abnormal metabolism of cancer cells
How immune cells recognize the abnormal metabolism of cancer cells
When cells become tumor cells, their metabolism changes fundamentally. Researchers at the University of Basel and the University Hospital Basel have now demonstrated that this change leaves traces that could provide targets for cancer immunotherapies. Cancer cells function in turbo mode: Their metabolism is programmed for rapid proliferation, whereby their genetic material is also constantly copied and translated into proteins.

Life Sciences - 20.05.2024
Exercise can help slow cognitive decline
Exercise can help slow cognitive decline
University of Queensland research has found exercise can help prevent or slow cognitive decline during ageing. A team led by Associate Professor Jana Vukovic from UQ's School of Biomedical Sciences Queensland Brain Institute Dr Solal Chauquet from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience assessed the expression of genes in individual brain cells of mice.
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