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Life Sciences - Health - 25.06.2019
How the brain helps us make good decisions - and bad ones
A prevailing theory in neuroscience holds that people make decisions based on integrated global calculations that occur within the frontal cortex of the brain.  However, Yale researchers have found that three distinct circuits connecting to different brain regions are involved in making good decisions, bad ones, and determining which of those past choices to store in memory, they report June 25 in the journal Neuron.

Life Sciences - 25.06.2019
How the Chlamydosaurus dragon got its frill
How the Chlamydosaurus dragon got its frill
Studying the developing embryo of the 'frilled dragon' lizard, UNIGE researchers reveal that physical forces, rather than a genetic program, generate the characteristic folds of its spectacular collar. The frilled dragon exhibits a distinctive large erectile ruff. This lizard usually keeps the frill folded back against its body but can spread it as a spectacular display to scare off predators.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 24.06.2019
Monarch butterflies bred in captivity may lose ability to migrate
Monarch butterflies purchased from a commercial breeder did not fly in a southward direction, even in offspring raised outdoors, in a new study conducted by scientists at the University of Chicago. Wild-caught monarchs bred indoors under simulated outdoor conditions also did not orient south, suggesting that captive breeding disrupts the monarch's famous annual migratory behavior.

Life Sciences - 24.06.2019
(Not only) the wind shows the way
(Not only) the wind shows the way
06/24/2019 When the South African dung beetle rolls its dung ball through the savannah, it must know the way as precisely as possible. Scientists have now discovered that it does not orient itself solely on the position of the sun. The South African dung beetle Scarabaeus lamarcki has - to put it mildly - an interesting technique to ensure its offspring a good start in life.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.06.2019
Scientists Hit Pay Dirt with New Microbial Research Technique
Scientists Hit Pay Dirt with New Microbial Research Technique
A better method for studying microbes in the soil will help scientists understand large-scale environmental cycles Long ago, during the European Renaissance, Leonardo da Vinci wrote that we humans "know more about the movement of celestial bodies than about the soil underfoot." Five hundred years and innumerable technological and scientific advances later, his sentiment still holds true.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
Researchers Develop First Mind-controlled Robotic Arm Without Brain Implants
A team of researchers from Carnegie Mellon University, in collaboration with the University of Minnesota, has made a breakthrough that could benefit paralyzed patients and those with movement disorders. Using a noninvasive brain-computer interface (BCI), scientists have developed the first successful mind-controlled robotic arm exhibiting the ability to continuously track and follow a computer cursor.

Health - Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
A bacterial remnant may explain arthritis in Lyme patients
Even after antibiotic treatment, some Lyme disease patients continue to suffer from debilitating arthritis. A new Yale study may explain why. The tick-borne bacterium Borrelia burgdorferi leaves behind parts of its cell wall in patients' joints, which appears to trigger an immune reaction that contributes to the inflammation observed in Lyme arthritis patients, the researchers report in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
Blue Pigment from Engineered Fungi Could Help Turn the Textile Industry Green
A new platform for producing blue pigment could provide a sustainable alternative to conventional synthetic dyes and open the door for next-generation bioproduction Lead researcher Aindrila Mukhopadhyay holds a vial of purified indigoidine crystals. (Credit: Marilyn Chung/Berkeley Lab) Often, the findings of fundamental scientific research are many steps away from a product that can be immediately brought to the public.

Life Sciences - 21.06.2019
Neuroscience research questions current alcohol limit
Neuroscience research questions current alcohol limit
New research by neuroscientists from the University of Sussex shows that drinking only one pint of beer or a large glass of wine is enough to significantly compromise a person's sense of agency. Sense of agency is the feeling of being in control of our actions. It is an important aspect of human social behaviour, as it implies knowledge of the consequences of those actions.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
One Third of Cambodians Infected with Threadworm
One Third of Cambodians Infected with Threadworm
Strongyloides stercoralis is a soil-transmitted threadworm that is endemic in many tropical and subtropical countries. In a nation-wide study in Cambodia, Swiss TPH scientists and their partners found that nearly a third of the population is infected with S. stercoralis. The results were published today in the peer-reviewed journal PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2019
Bats’ brains sync when they socialize
Socializing bats show highly correlated brain activity, shows a new UC Berkeley study. (Kim Taylor/Warren Photographic photo) The phrase "we're on the same wavelength" may be more than just a friendly saying: A new study by University of California, Berkeley, researchers shows that bats' brain activity is literally in sync when bats engage in social behaviors like grooming, fighting or sniffing each other.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.06.2019
Using human genome, scientists build CRISPR for RNA to open pathways for medicine
Less than a decade ago, biology underwent one of those once-in-a-generation events that shakes up a scientific field, when the discovery of gene editing technology called CRISPR/Cas-9 made it possible to precisely alter the sequence of DNA in a living being. But while DNA may be the raw blueprints for life, RNA is the architect-translating those ideas into reality for the cell through proteins and regulation.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
Cancer control: Structure of important transport protein solved
For the first time, Bernese researchers have been able to solve the structure of a transport protein and thus to describe the functional mechanism that plays a significant role in the survival of cancer cells. This is an important step towards developing effective inhibitors and fight tumor growth. Certain cancer cells depend on exporting the metabolite lactate, which accumulates during the generation on energy.

Environment - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Software to protect the world's most endangered species
Software to protect the world's most endangered species
By combining genetic and environmental databases, researchers at EPFL are seeking to help biologists identify more accurately the animal and plant species most exposed to climate change, in order to develop appropriate conservation methods. Northern Morocco is home to a type of sheep that has a specific gene, developed over thousands of years of evolution.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 20.06.2019
How in times of trouble animals also stand together
How in times of trouble animals also stand together
Faced with potential violence from rival factions, dwarf mongoose groupmates pull together and behave more co-operatively, according to a new study by University of Bristol researchers published today [Thursday 20 June]. Conflict between rival groups is common throughout the animal world, from ants to chimpanzees, but its consequences have been little studied.

Environment - Life Sciences - 19.06.2019
Deep submersible dives shed light on rarely explored coral reefs
Deep submersible dives shed light on rarely explored coral reefs
Just beyond where conventional scuba divers can go is an area of the ocean that still is largely unexplored. In waters this deep - about 100 to at least 500 feet below the surface - little to no light breaks through. Researchers must rely on submersible watercraft or sophisticated diving equipment to be able to study ocean life at these depths, known as the mesophotic zone.

Life Sciences - Health - 19.06.2019
Cell Division at High Speed
Cell Division at High Speed
06/19/2019 When two proteins work together, this worsens the prognosis for lung cancer patients: their chances of survival are particularly poor in this case. In malignant tumours, the cells usually proliferate quickly and uncontrollably. A research team from the Biocenter of Julius-Maximilians-Universität (JMU) Würzburg in Bavaria, Germany, has discovered that two important regulators of cell division can interact in this process.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.06.2019
Biology of leptin, the hunger hormone
In a new study, Yale researchers offer insight into leptin, a hormone that plays a key role in appetite, overeating, and obesity. Their findings advance knowledge about leptin and weight gain, and also suggest a potential strategy for developing future weight-loss treatments, they said. The study, led by investigators at Yale and Harvard, was published the week of June 17, 2019, in the journal PNAS.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.06.2019
How common gut bacteria trigger a lethal autoimmune disease
What causes the immune system, designed to protect us, to turn on the body and attack healthy cells' Common bacteria that reside in the human gut may be partly to blame, say Yale researchers, who studied the origins of a serious autoimmune disease that frequently affects young women. For their study, the research team focused on cells from patients with antiphospholipid syndrome, an immune system disorder that raises the risk of blood clots.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 18.06.2019
Guns are often obtained just days before a crime
Guns recovered from crimes are often a decade old, but knowing when a gun was manufactured doesn't reveal how many times it may have changed hands. A new study co-authored by University of Chicago scholar Harold Pollack examines the time elapsed between the acquisition of a gun and when it was used in a crime.
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