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Health - Life Sciences - 10:34
Evidence of heart injury in ’healthy’ people may lead to more effective treatment
New evidence of heart injury found in apparently healthy people could help pave the way for better long-term monitoring of cardiac health and personalised approaches to treatment, scientists say. Their findings appear today in the American Heart Association's journal Circulation, based on research conducted at the Universities of Glasgow, Edinburgh, Oxford, New South Wales and Johns Hopkins University.

Life Sciences - 23.04.2019
Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
Stressed, anxious? Ask the brain!
Our actions are driven by “internal states” such as anxiety, stress or thirst - which will strongly affect and motivate our behaviors. How such states are represented by complex brain-wide circuits, including sub-cortical structures such as the amygdala, is unknown. In a study recently published in Science, the group of Andreas Lüthi used a deep brain imaging technique to monitor amygdala activity in active mice and revealed the neuronal dynamics encoding behavioral states.

Life Sciences - 23.04.2019
Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues
Welding with stem cells for next-generation surgical glues
Scientists at the University of Bristol have invented a new technology that could lead to the development of a new generation of smart surgical glues and dressings for chronic wounds. The new method, pioneered by Dr Adam Perriman and colleagues, involves re-engineering the membranes of stem cells to effectively "weld" the cells together.

Life Sciences - 22.04.2019
Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing
Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing
Research has shown that people who are born blind or become blind early in life often have a more nuanced sense of hearing, especially when it comes to musical abilities and tracking moving objects in space (imagine crossing a busy road using sound alone).  For decades scientists have wondered what changes in the brain might underlie these enhanced auditory abilities.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
Behavioral disorders in kids with autism linked to lower brain connectivity
More than a quarter of children with autism spectrum disorder are also diagnosed with disruptive behavior disorders. For the first time, Yale researchers have identified a possible biological cause: a key mechanism that regulates emotion functions differently in the brains of the children who exhibit disruptive behavior.   The study appears in Biological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 18.04.2019
Genetic defect causing intellectual disability discovered by Sussex scientists
Researchers at the University of Sussex have discovered a new genetic defect which causes a form of intellectual disability; a finding that will improve screening programmes and help to end a ‘diagnostic odyssey' for families across the globe. ‘X-linked syndromal intellectual disability' (XLID) affects around 3% of the global population with underlying genetic mutations being carried and passed on by unaffected females via their X-chromosome (human females possess two copies of the X chromosome, while males only have one).

Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
Taming the genome's
Taming the genome's "jumping" sequences
EPFL scientists have discovered how a family of proteins that regulates the activity of transposable elements in the genome allows them to make inheritable changes to the growing fetus. The human genome is fascinating. Once predicted to contain about a hundred thousand protein-coding genes, it now seems that the number is closer to twenty thousand, and maybe less.

Life Sciences - Environment - 18.04.2019
Usurp the Burp
How seaweed could help curb cow burps—one of California's greatest sources of methane emissions Marine ecologist Jennifer Smith has been cultivating Asparagopsis taxiformis seaweed in her lab at Scripps Institution of Oceanography. Researchers have found that adding small amounts of this seaweed to cattle feed can dramatically reduce methane-laden cow burps.

Life Sciences - Health - 18.04.2019
Next frontier in study of gut bacteria: mining microbial molecules
The human gut harbors trillions of invisible microbial inhabitants, referred to as the microbiota, that collectively produce thousands of unique small molecules. The sources and biological functions of the vast majority of these molecules are unknown. Yale researchers recently applied a new technology to uncover microbiota-derived chemicals that affect human physiology, revealing a complex network of interactions with potentially broad-reaching impacts on human health.

Life Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 18.04.2019
Team proposes plan to use bioinformatics, open data to boost science in developing countries
Team proposes plan to use bioinformatics, open data to boost science in developing countries
UCLA computer scientists and their collaborators have devised a plan for the use of cloud computing and big data analysis to allow scientists in developing countries to jumpstart bioinformatics research programs. Bioinformatics is the computational analysis of biological data. Research in this emerging area has broad applications for diagnosing and treating diseases and preventing their spread; and in developing public health strategies and new drugs.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
Microbiomes of diabetic foot ulcers are associated with clinical outcomes
MADISON - New research suggests that the microbial communities associated with chronic wounds common in diabetic patients affect whether those wounds heal or lead to amputations. Work led by University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health Professor of Medical Microbiology and Immunology Lindsay Kalan and her colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania found that particular strains of the common pathogen Staphylococcus aureus exclusively infected diabetic foot ulcers that never healed, indicating these strains may delay healing.

Health - Life Sciences - 18.04.2019
More severe salmonella outbreaks ahead
More severe salmonella outbreaks ahead
University of Sydney researchers have developed a model that can predict outbreaks several months in advance, and its results come as a warning ahead of the Easter long weekend. Australia has more salmonella outbreaks than any other country in the world, with the number of cases doubling over the last decade.

Life Sciences - 17.04.2019
Making room for genome regulation
Making room for genome regulation
Chromatin remodelers have the ability to move nucleosomes, which represent a physical barrier for access to DNA. Work by the group of Dirk Schübeler helps to better understand how remodelers orchestrate the global organization of nucleosomes in mammals. In a study published in Nature, the researchers uncovered how two classes of remodelers selectively mediate the binding of distinct transcription factors.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.04.2019
Scientists restore some functions in a pig’s brain hours after death
Circulation and cellular activity were restored in a pig's brain four hours after its death, a finding that challenges long-held assumptions about the timing and irreversible nature of the cessation of some brain functions after death, Yale scientists report April 17 . The brain of a postmortem pig obtained from a meatpacking plant was isolated and circulated with a specially designed chemical solution.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.04.2019
Mystery arthritis-linked knee bone three times more common than 100 years ago
Mystery arthritis-linked knee bone three times more common than 100 years ago
The fabella, a small bone in the knee once lost to human evolution, has made a surprising resurgence over the last century. We are taught the human skeleton contains 206 bones, but our study challenges this. Dr Michael Berthaume Department of Bioengineering The new findings could help clinicians treating patients with knee issues and provide insight into human evolution over the past 100 years.

Environment - Life Sciences - 17.04.2019
Remarkable biodiversity in Swiss rivers
Remarkable biodiversity in Swiss rivers
Switzerland's rivers harbour a unique biodiversity. From 2013 to 2018 - in order to assess this diversity in more detail for the first time - scientists from the Fish Ecology & Evolution department systematically collected fish samples (in September and October in each case) from hundreds of rivers and streams.

Life Sciences - 16.04.2019
Stanford statement on fact-finding review related to Dr. Jiankui He
Stanford University issued the following statement regarding the conclusion of a fact-finding review. Following the claim by Chinese scientist Jiankui He that his research team had produced the world's first gene-edited babies, Stanford University undertook a fact-finding review of Dr. He's interactions with several Stanford researchers during and after the time he spent at Stanford as a postdoctoral scholar in 2011-12.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 16.04.2019
New drug mimics benefits of ketamine for depression
A new small-molecule drug produced a rapid antidepressant response similar to that of ketamine when tested in mice, a new Yale-led study published April 16 in The Journal of Clinical Investigation shows. The effects of the drug, called NV-5138, in rodent models mimicked the rapid actions of the anesthetic ketamine, a variation of which, Esketamine, was recently approved by the FDA for use in depressed patients who do not respond to other medications.

Life Sciences - 15.04.2019
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study, led by the universities of Bristol and Oxford and published today [Monday 15 April] in the journal PNAS, found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.04.2019
Gut bacteria work to keep us healthy
An international team of scientists, led by the University of Glasgow, have announced a new advance in our understanding of how bacteria in our gut can provide positive health benefits. The breakthrough findings, published today , provide evidence that it may be possible to design drugs that will mimic these positive health benefits in a way that might be used to treat diseases such as type II diabetes.
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