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Life Sciences - Health - 07:00
Bile acids boost gut regeneration
Bile acids boost gut regeneration
Researchers at EPFL have made a surprising discovery about how bile acids act as signaling molecules to boost intestinal regeneration. The discovery sheds light on the role of bile acids as hormone-like molecules and opens new ways for regenerative therapies of the gut. Intestinal stem cells replenish the cells lining the gut epithelium, which usually renews itself every week.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.09.2020
A pregnancy ended by COVID-19 informs new understanding and protocols
When the first pregnant woman diagnosed with COVID-19 was admitted to Yale New Haven Hospital in March, she was in her second trimester and critically ill. At the time, almost nothing was known about how the novel coronavirus disease impacted pregnant mothers and their unborn children. Yale physician-scientists acted quickly not only to save the mother, who had severe early-onset preeclampsia, but also to collect samples that might help them better understand the disease.  According to a case report, published Sept.

Life Sciences - Campus - 17.09.2020
'Cellular compass' guides plant stem cell division
’Cellular compass’ guides plant stem cell division
Biologists observing the formation of leaves noticed the nuclei moved in bewildering ways. Further investigation uncovered proteins that act as compasses and motors, guiding the divisions of individual cells to create the overall pattern of the leaf. The stem cells tasked with creating and maintaining biological tissues have a difficult job.

Life Sciences - Health - 17.09.2020
How Fear Persists in the Mouse Brain
Most people have experienced, at some point in their lives, a sudden unexpected fright. Even after a shadowy figure in a darkened room turns out to just be a chair, your heart rate is still high, your palms stay sweaty, and your senses remain alert for another threat. This sort of lasting response is an example of a persistent internal state.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.09.2020
Secret of plant dietary fibre structure revealed
Secret of plant dietary fibre structure revealed
The secret of how fibre shapes the structure of plant cell walls has been revealed, with potentially wide-ranging applications ranging from nutrition and health to agriculture. Researchers from The University of Queensland and KTH Royal Institute of Technology in Sweden have uncovered the mechanics of how plant cell walls balance the strength and rigidity provided by cellulose with its ability to stretch and compress.

Life Sciences - 17.09.2020
Native stinging tree toxins match the pain of spiders and cone snails
The painful toxins wielded by a giant Australian stinging tree are surprisingly similar to the toxins found in spiders and cone snails, University of Queensland researchers have found. The Gympie-Gympie stinging tree is one of the world's most venomous plants and causes extreme long-lasting pain. Associate Professor Irina Vetter , Dr Thomas Durek and their teams at UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience found a new family of toxins, which they've named 'gympietides' after the Gympie-Gympie stinging tree.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.09.2020
Engineers seek to mimic properties of the human body
Engineers seek to mimic properties of the human body
Tissue engineering experts say future biomaterials will need to mimic the human body's “stretch and squidge? properties. Findings from University of Queensland Professor Justin Cooper-White and international colleagues have been published in the prestigious journal Nature. “The characters in some old TV programs looked like normal people on the outside - and similarly we know future biomaterials will need to have almost-identical properties to those of all of the tissues in the human body,' Professor Cooper-White said.

Materials Science - Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
Anti-reflective coating inspired by fly eyes
A team from the University of Geneva has artificially reproduced a nanoscale coating on different types of surfaces that usually covers the eyes of fruit flies, and which provides anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties. The eyes of many insects, including the fruit fly, are covered by a thin and transparent coating made up of tiny protuberances with anti-reflective, anti-adhesive properties.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2020
Next-gen organoids grow and function like real tissues
Bioengineers at EPFL have created miniature intestines in a dish that match up anatomically and functionally to the real thing better than any other lab-grown tissue models. The biological complexity and longevity of the new organoid technology is an important step towards enabling drug testing, personalized medicine, and perhaps, one day, transplantations.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 16.09.2020
World's largest ever DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren't all Scandinavian
World’s largest ever DNA sequencing of Viking skeletons reveals they weren’t all Scandinavian
Invaders, pirates, warriors - the history books taught us that Vikings were brutal predators who travelled by sea from Scandinavia to pillage and raid their way across Europe and beyond. The results change the perception of who a Viking actually was.

Life Sciences - Health - 16.09.2020
Team pinpoints brain circuitry underlying dissociative experiences
Stanford scientists identified key brain circuitry that plays a role in the mysterious experience called dissociation, in which people can feel disconnected from their own body and from reality. It's neither uncommon nor especially worrisome for people to lose themselves in a great book or a daydream.

Environment - Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Marine animals live where ocean is most 'breathable,' but ranges could shrink with climate change
Marine animals live where ocean is most ’breathable,’ but ranges could shrink with climate change
As oceans warm due to climate change, scientists are trying to predict how marine animals - from backboned fish to spineless jellyfish - will react. Laboratory experiments indicate that many could theoretically tolerate temperatures far higher than what they encounter today. But these studies don't mean that marine animals can maintain their current ranges in warmer oceans, according to Curtis Deutsch , an associate professor of oceanography at the University of Washington.

Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing chickens experience higher welfare, commercial scale study finds
Slower growing broiler chickens are healthier and have more fun than conventional breeds of birds, new evidence from an independent commercial scale farm trial has shown. The study carried out by researchers from FAI Farms, the University of Bristol and The Norwegian University of Life Sciences, is published today [16 September], in Scientific Reports.

Life Sciences - 16.09.2020
Reprogramming Brain Cells Enables Flexible Decision-Making
Reprogramming Brain Cells Enables Flexible Decision-Making
Humans, like other animals, have the ability to constantly adapt to new situations. Researchers at the Brain Research Institute of the University of Zurich have utilized a mouse model to reveal which neurons in the brain are in command in guiding adaptive behavior. Their new study contributes to our understanding of decision-making processes in healthy and infirm people.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.09.2020
COVID-19 Virus Uses Heparan Sulfate to Get Inside Cells
Discovery opens new possibilities for treating COVID-19 by disrupting virus' ability to bind the carbohydrate, potentially by using a repurposed drug A molecule known as ACE2 sits like a doorknob on the outer surfaces of the cells that line the lungs. Since January 2020, researchers have known that SARS-CoV-2, the novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19, primarily uses ACE2 to enter these cells and establish respiratory infections.

Life Sciences - 14.09.2020
Embryos taking shape via buckling
Embryos taking shape via buckling
Scientists have demonstrated that cellular tissues are deformed by buckling (or bending under the action of compression), a phenomenon that could lie behind embryo morphogenesis. The embryo of an animal first looks like a hollow sphere. Invaginations then appear at different stages of development, which will give rise to the body's structures (the brain, digestive tract, etc.).

Life Sciences - Health - 14.09.2020
Mechanism discovered how the coronavirus hijacks the cell
Mechanism discovered how the coronavirus hijacks the cell
Researchers at ETH Zurich and the University of Bern have discovered a mechanism by which the corona virus manipulates human cells to ensure its own replication. This knowledge will help to develop drugs and vaccines against the corona virus. Like a pirate hijacking a ship, a virus takes control of an infected cell because every virus depends on the resources and molecular machines of the cell to multiply.

Life Sciences - Materials Science - 11.09.2020
Altgold Helps Build Silk Scaffolding for Tissue
SURF student supports new 3D printing technique for bioengineering Carnegie Mellon University undergraduate Tahlia Altgold makes biomedical research using silk run more smoothly. "Silk is a really incredible biomedical material that's been used for a long time in things like sutures,” said Altgold, a junior majoring in materials science and biomedical engineering.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.09.2020
COVID-19 exposure and viral carriage in health care workers
2.4% of asymptomatic health care workers at work in Birmingham were carriers of the SARS-CoV-2 virus and over a third of those individuals subsequently became unwell with symptoms of COVID-19, a new cross-sectional study by researchers at the University of Birmingham and University Hospitals Birmingham NHS Foundation Trust has found.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 11.09.2020
Mapping the depths of the genome
Mapping the depths of the genome
Using algorithms to analyse the whole-genome sequence of a tumour can make treatment more successful - and can even help determine how cells become cancerous. Detailed genetic analysis of tumour tissue samples has become standard practice at a small number of the world's leading hospitals specialising in cancer treatment.
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