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Health - Life Sciences - 09:07
Weapon in immune system arsenal could unlock MS treatment
Weapon in immune system arsenal could unlock MS treatment
Researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) have identified why certain cells in the body, known as Th17 cells, go rogue and promote the onset of autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS).

Life Sciences - Environment - 26.01.2022
Genome Atlas to support the rescue of biodiversity in Europe
Genome Atlas to support the rescue of biodiversity in Europe
Göttingen University joins six hundred researchers from 48 countries calling for comprehensive genome analyses for species conservation in Europe To provide important genomic data to inform research about Europe's biodiversity, scientists from 48 different countries initiated the "European Reference Genome Atlas" (ERGA) in 2021.

Life Sciences - 26.01.2022
Genes newly linked to longer human lifespan
Genes newly linked to longer human lifespan
A group of genes that play an essential role in building components of our cells can also impact human lifespan, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The genes have previously been found to extend lifespan in small organisms, such as making fruit flies live 10% longer, but this is the first time scientists have demonstrated a link in people as well, as they report in a new Genome Research paper.

Environment - Life Sciences - 26.01.2022
Salinization of river and lake ecosystems: a research agenda for a global threat
Salinization of river and lake ecosystems: a research agenda for a global threat
The increasing salinity in freshwater habitats —rivers, lakes, wetlands, etc.— is a global threat to the conservation of biodiversity and the natural habitats of the world. Human activities such as mining and intensive agriculture, as well as the rise of the sea level caused by the climate change, are placing the concentration of salt in continental waters up to the highest levels to date.

Life Sciences - 26.01.2022
Help for stressed-out cells in a crisis
Help for stressed-out cells in a crisis
According to a team of researchers at the University of Münster, mitochondria provide unexpected help for cells in a crisis by respiring away harmful substances. A current study produced by the Institute of Biology and Biotechnology of Plants (IBBP) shows three things: that this mechanism can be triggered by reductive stress, that it protects the folding of certain proteins destined for export, and that the cell's "powerhouse" consequently acts even more flexibly than was previously known.

Health - Life Sciences - 25.01.2022
Study of gene therapy treatment in Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome
Teams from the AP-HP, University of Paris, Inserm, within the Imagine Institute, the University College of London, and Généthon, have carried out work on treatment by gene therapy consisting of transplanting the patient's own genetically modified hematopoietic stem cells as part of a phase I/II clinical trial, promoted by Genethon, in 8 patients with Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome (WAS).

Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2022
Alzheimer's disease: an alternative hypothesis based on synaptic alterations
Alzheimer’s disease: an alternative hypothesis based on synaptic alterations
New research suggests that targeting proteins essential to neurotransmission could be a promising alternative to treat Alzheimer's disease New research published today in Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the Alzheimer's Association could explain why neurons fail to communicate effectively in people with Alzheimer's disease (AD).

Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2022
Study detects how a genetic variant modifies the brain stimulation impact on memory
Study detects how a genetic variant modifies the brain stimulation impact on memory
The gene of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is associated with several processes related to memory and brain plasticity. Now, a paper reveals that it is easier to alter the cognitive activity through transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) in people with the genetic variant Val/Val for the BDNF gene.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 25.01.2022
Do you see faces in things?
Do you see faces in things?
Seeing faces in everyday objects is a common experience, but research from The University of Queensland has found people are more likely to see male faces when they see an image on the trunk of a tree or in burnt toast over breakfast. Dr Jessica Taubert from UQ's School of Psychology said face pareidolia, the illusion of seeing a facial structure in an everyday object, tells us a lot about how our brains detect and recognise social cues.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 25.01.2022
Hungry yeast are tiny, living thermometers
Membranes are crucial to our cells. Every cell in your body is enclosed by one. And each of those cells contains specialized compartments, or organelles, which are also enclosed by membranes. Membranes help cells carry out tasks like breaking down food for energy, building and dismantling proteins, keeping track of environmental conditions, sending signals and deciding when to divide.

Life Sciences - Health - 25.01.2022
How the brain knows when to take out the trash
The brain has its own housekeeping service, a sophisticated mechanism that cleans up debris that is left over from cellular activity. But scientists have had a hard time figuring out exactly how the brain knows when to initiate this cellular "trash pickup." A Yale-led team of scientists has identified a protein that is key to this process, which is known as autophagy.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.01.2022
Link between sugar metabolism and Parkinson's disease
Link between sugar metabolism and Parkinson’s disease
In brief: Parkinson's disease is the second most common neurodegenerative disease, but we still do not understand why this disease occurs. Scientists from the UCLouvain de Duve Institute have discovered a new type of molecular damage that is (glycolysis). They also discovered a mechanism that allows cells to prevent this type of damage.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.01.2022
Way to disarm potentially deadly Listeria bacteria
Way to disarm potentially deadly Listeria bacteria
University of Queensland researchers have unlocked a way of fighting Listeria infections, which can cause severe illness in pregnant women and people with compromised immune systems. During the study, researchers discovered a way to block Listeria from making the proteins that allow bacteria to survive and multiply in immune cells.

Health - Life Sciences - 24.01.2022
Fast, cheap test can detect COVID-19 virus’ genome without need for PCR
Researchers at the University of Washington have developed a new test for COVID-19 that combines the speed of over-the-counter antigen tests with the accuracy of PCR tests that are processed in medical labs and hospitals. The Harmony COVID-19 test is a diagnostic test that, like PCR tests for COVID-19, detects genetic material from the SARS-CoV-2 virus.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.01.2022
Scientist receives grant for promising Alzheimer research
Researcher returns from US with state-of-the-art knowledge Friday, January 21, 2022 — VUB scientist Gamze Ates has been awarded ¤100,000 for research into Alzheimer's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2022
What lies beneath COVID-19 inflammation
What lies beneath COVID-19 inflammation
Scientists at EPFL and the University Hospital of Lausanne (CHUV) have found the biological mechanism behind the inflammation seen in COVID-19 infections that involve a rise in interferons in the lungs and skin. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, scientists across the world are looking at the pathology of the SARS-CoV-2 virus in an effort to find effective treatments for patients.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.01.2022
Branching worm discovered in Japan named after Godzilla's nemesis
Branching worm discovered in Japan named after Godzilla’s nemesis
International team led by Göttingen University describe new species Ramisyllis kingghidorahi Branching marine worms are bizarre creatures with one head but a body that branches over and over again into multiple posterior ends. Until now, only two species of these curious beasts, thought to be extremely rare, were known.

Health - Life Sciences - 20.01.2022
Attack on the malaria parasite cytoskeleton
Attack on the malaria parasite cytoskeleton
Researchers succeeded in the purification of Plasmodium "tubulin", the molecular building block of cytoskeletal filaments - an important step in the search for novel anti-malarials Despite all efforts, malaria remains one of the deadliest diseases with an estimated 240.000.000 cases and more than 600.000 fatalities in 2020 alone.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.01.2022
Modeling How Cells Choose Their Fates
It may seem hard to believe, but each one of us began as a single cell that proliferated into the trillions of cells that make up our bodies. Though each of our cells has the exact same genetic information, each also performs a specialized function: neurons govern our thoughts and behaviors, for example, while immune cells learn to recognize and fight off disease, skin cells protect us from the outside world, muscle cells enable movement, and so on.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.01.2022
Shift work helps marine microbes share scarce ocean resources
Though they may be small, microorganisms are the most abundant form of life in the ocean. Marine microbes are responsible for making roughly half of the organic carbon that's usable by life. Many marine microbes live near the surface, depending on energy from the sun for photosynthesis. Yet between the low supply of and high competition for some key nutrients, like nitrogen, in the open ocean, scientists have puzzled over the vast diversity of microbial species found there.
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