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Life Sciences - Environment - 17.08.2018
Innovate UK awards for studies into sustainable livestock production and improving chicken welfare
17 August 2018 Bristol Vet School has been awarded two Innovate UK grants totalling nearly £160k for studies that aim to further our progress towards sustainable livestock production and improve broiler chicken welfare. Dr Andy Butterworth , Reader in Farm Animal Science, will lead the 100K Bristol component of a 403k study entitled ‘Lighting for Broiler Enhanced Welfare and Commercial Output'.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 17.08.2018
New perspectives to improve wheat: the reference sequence of wheat genome is finally a reality
New perspectives to improve wheat: the reference sequence of wheat genome is finally a reality
The International Wheat Genome Sequencing Consortium (IWGSC), of which INRA is a leading member, published the first wheat genome reference sequence in Science , on 17 August 2018. French research teams from INRA, CEA, and the universities of Clermont-Auvergne, Evry, Paris-Sud and Paris-Saclay contributed to the project, a scientific milestone due to the enormous complexity and size of the genome - five times larger than the human genome and forty times larger than the rice genome.

Life Sciences - 17.08.2018
Are our wild animals growing old gracefully?
Are our wild animals growing old gracefully?
For most of us, the body's deterioration is an unavoidable part of getting older. This age-related decline, known as "senescence", can occur subtly and slowly for some individuals, while for others it happens much faster. A researcher from The Australian National University is trying to find out why.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.08.2018
How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant
How an herbivore hijacks a nutrient uptake strategy of its host plant
The struggle for iron determines the fate of maize and insect pest: Maize plants release secondary metabolites into the soil that bind to iron and thereby facilitate its uptake by the plant. The Western corn rootworm, the economically most important maize pest worldwide, is attracted by these complexes, extracts the bound iron from the maize plant and uses it for its own nutrition.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 16.08.2018
Manipulating how yeast cells work could lead to new medical treatments
When a stimulus descends upon a cell, it sets off a flurry of activity. Sensors on the surface take in information and relay it inside to other proteins, which perform computations and transmit their findings. The cell makes a decision and responds to the stimulus. Megan McClean wants to figure out how it all works and then manipulate the process - fundamental research with implications for identifying drug targets and designing medical treatments.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 16.08.2018
Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion
Men and women show surprising differences in seeing motion
Administrative affairs Arts and entertainment Buildings and grounds For UW employees Health and medicine Honors and awards Official notices Politics and government UW and the community Humans' ability to notice moving objects has always been a useful skill, from avoiding an animal predator in ancient times to crossing a busy street in the modern world.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 16.08.2018
Anti-cancer drug offers potential alternative to transplant for patients with liver failure, study finds
16 August 2018 Patients suffering sudden liver failure could in the future benefit from a new treatment that could reduce the need for transplants, research published today shows. The study by scientists at University of Edinburgh MRC Centre for Regenerative Medicine, the Cancer Research UK Beatson Institute in Glasgow, and the University of Bristol, is published in Science Translational Medicine.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 15.08.2018
Amputees feel as though their prosthetic limb belongs to their body
In a breakthrough approach that combines virtual reality and artificial tactile sensations, two amputees feel as though their prosthetic hand belongs to their own body. Moreover, the scientists show that the phantom limb actually grows into the prosthetic hand. The famous idiom "seeing is believing" is not enough to help amputees with the use of their prosthetic limb.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 15.08.2018
Genetic link discovered between circadian rhythms and mood disorders
Circadian rhythms are regular 24-hour variations in behaviour and activity that control many aspects of our lives, from hormone levels to sleeping and eating habits. In the largest ever genetic study of circadian rest-activity cycles in humans, scientists at the University of Glasgow have identified a possible genetic link between circadian disruption and mood disorders.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 15.08.2018
Experts discuss sensors and simulation method to treat brain disorders
A non-invasive technique to electrically simulate the brain and wearable sensors could lead to better treatments of brain disorders, say experts. Dr Nir Grossman, Assistant Professor at the Division of Brain Sciences at Imperial College London, and Professor Paul Matthews, Edmond and Lily Safra Chair of Translational Neuroscience and Therapeutics at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, showcased their research into treating neurological diseases at the recent Imperial College Academic Health Science (AHSC) seminar at Charing Cross Hospital.

Life Sciences - Physics / Materials Science - 15.08.2018
Signposts for cells
Signposts for cells
For the replacement of animal testing with alternatives in medical rsearch, complex microtissues need to be cultivated. Researchers from Empa have developed a special polymer scaffold for threedimensional cell cultures. Light beams act as signposts for the cells. In pharmaceutical research, scientists try to do without animal testing wherever possible or replace it with experiments on cell or tissue cultures.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 15.08.2018
Experts discuss sensors and stimulation method to treat brain disorders
A non-invasive technique to electrically stimulate the brain and wearable sensors could lead to better treatments of brain disorders, say experts. Dr Nir Grossman, Assistant Professor at the Division of Brain Sciences at Imperial College London, and Professor Paul Matthews, Edmond and Lily Safra Chair of Translational Neuroscience and Therapeutics at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, showcased their research into treating neurological diseases at the recent Imperial College Academic Health Science (AHSC) seminar at Charing Cross Hospital.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 15.08.2018
Potent psychedelic DMT mimics near-death experience in the brain
Potent psychedelic DMT mimics near-death experience in the brain
A powerful psychedelic compound found in ayahuasca can model near-death experiences in the brain, a study has found. Near-death experiences, or NDEs, are significant psychological events that occur close to actual or perceived impending death. Commonly reported aspects of NDEs include out of body experiences, feelings of transitioning to another world and of inner peace, many of which are also reported by users taking DMT.

Life Sciences - Sport Sciences - 15.08.2018
What we see is not always what we get
What we see is not always what we get
Researchers are helping to explain why some people anticipate and react to fast-moving objects much quicker than others. When Collingwood footballer Jeremy Howe launches into the clouds to take a "speccy" over an AFL opponent, or Serena Williams returns a lightning-quick tennis serve - most of us marvel at their skill and speed.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 14.08.2018
Broccoli, cabbage and kale may protect against colon cancer
Chemicals produced by vegetables such as kale, cabbage and broccoli could help to maintain a healthy gut and prevent colon cancer. The early-stage mouse study, from scientists at the Francis Crick Institute and Imperial College London , is published in the journal Immunity.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.08.2018
New insights in cell death in plants might generate new leads for weed control
( 14-08-2018 ) Ironically, most of a tree's biomass is actually not alive. It is formed by persistent cell corpses collectively called wood. The formation of wood is one of the many programmed cell death processes important for plant growth & development. The lab of Prof. Moritz Nowack (VIB-UGent Center for Plant Systems Biology) investigates the regulation of these plant cell death processes in the model plant Arabidopsis.

Life Sciences - 14.08.2018
Poor sleep triggers viral loneliness and social rejection
Poor sleep triggers viral loneliness and social rejection
Click to share on Google+ (Opens in new window) Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window) Click to print (Opens in new window) Poor sleep can literally kill your social life. UC Berkeley researchers have found that sleep-deprived people feel lonelier and less inclined to engage with others, avoiding close contact in much the same way as people with social anxiety.

Life Sciences - Environment - 14.08.2018
Help survey wasps over the bank holiday weekend
Help survey wasps over the bank holiday weekend
Wasps might not be the nation's favourite insects but are some of the most important so UCL and University of Gloucestershire scientists are again asking for the public's help to find out more about these misunderstood creatures. "Wasps are predators, pest controllers and pollinators - they are absolutely vital for a healthy ecosystem and they deserve our respect.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 14.08.2018
Developing better treatments for mental illness
A Cardiff University researcher is working to better understand the systems in the brain responsible for causing psychiatric disorders and has identified specific processes affected by genetic mutations in patients with schizophrenia and bipolar disorder. By studying genetic data from thousands of patients, Dr Nick Clifton's research pinpoints groups of proteins important for brain development, learning and memory that are central to the emergence of psychiatric disease.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 14.08.2018
Differences in immune responses due to age, sex, and genetics
Differences in immune responses due to age, sex, and genetics
Age, sex, and specific human genetic variants are the key factors behind differences between immune responses among healthy humans, finds a study of 1,000 individuals carried out by EPFL and the Pasteur Institute. Over the course of our life, we are continuously exposed to pathogens such as viruses and bacteria, meaning that our immune system is constantly at work.
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