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Life Sciences - Health - 14.12.2018
Newly identified enzyme could play key role in childbirth, muscle diseases
Scientists at Stanford have solved a 50-year-old mystery that could open up new areas of research into muscle disorders. The study revealed a human enzyme that modifies muscle proteins to help them grow and remain strong. Facebook Twitter Email Since the 1960s, scientists have known of a modification that occurs to a particular molecule in muscles, especially after exercise.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Scientists identify method to study resilience to pain
Scientists at the Yale School of Medicine and Veterans Affairs Connecticut Healthcare System have successfully demonstrated that it is possible to pinpoint genes that contribute to inter-individual differences in pain. Chronic pain affects an estimated 100 million people in the United States. Clinicians have long recognized that some people are more resilient to pain than others.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Genetic 'missing links' underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
Genetic ’missing links’ underlying mechanism of psychiatric diseases
UCLA researchers, in global collaboration, gain new understanding of brain architecture of autism, schizophrenia Sarah C.P. Williams Since the completion of the groundbreaking Human Genome Project in 2003, researchers have discovered changes to hundreds of parts of DNA, called genetic variants, that are associated with autism spectrum disorder, schizophrenia and other psychiatric diseases.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.12.2018
Autism Risk-Factors Identified in "Dark Matter" of Human Genome
Using cutting-edge statistical models to analyze data from nearly 2,000 families with an autistic child, a multi-institute research team discovered tens of thousands of rare mutations in noncoding DNA sequences and assessed if these contribute to autism spectrum disorder. Published Dec. 14 , the study is the largest to date for whole-genome sequencing in autism.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.12.2018
Faecal transplants, 'robotic guts' and the fight against deadly gut bugs
Faecal transplants, ’robotic guts’ and the fight against deadly gut bugs
A simple compound found in our gut could help to stop dangerous bacteria behind severe, and sometimes fatal, hospital infections. Dr Ben Mullish understands more than most about the seriousness of gut bugs. Although many people will appear to have no more than an upset stomach for a couple of days, infections of the gut and intestines can prove deadly to vulnerable patients, such as the elderly or those undergoing cancer therapy.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.12.2018
Watching brain cells fire in real time
Watching brain cells fire in real time
Brain scientists have plenty of ways to track the activity of individual neurons in the brain, but they're all invasive. Now, Stanford researchers have found a way to literally watch neurons fire - no electrodes or chemical modifications required. Facebook Twitter Email Scientists have plenty of ways to watch as individual neurons in a brain fire, sending electrical signals from one to the next, but they all share a basic problem.

Health - Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
15 percent of babies exposed to Zika before birth had severe abnormalities in first 18 months of life
15 percent of babies exposed to Zika before birth had severe abnormalities in first 18 months of life
FINDINGS Researchers evaluated motor skills and cognitive development, visual and hearing function, and brain images of children who had been exposed to the Zika virus during their mothers' pregnancies. By the age of 12 to 18 months, significant problems were present in seven of the 112 children (6.25 percent) who were evaluated for eye abnormalities, in six of the 49 children (12.2 percent) evaluated for hearing problems, and in 11 of the 94 children (11.7 percent) evaluated for severe delays in language, motor skills and/or cognitive function who also had brain imaging.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find
Teens get more sleep with later school start time, researchers find
When Seattle Public Schools announced that it would reorganize school start times across the district for the fall of 2016, the massive undertaking took more than a year to deploy. Elementary schools started earlier, while most middle and all of the district's 18 high schools shifted their opening bell almost an hour later - from 7:50 a.m. to 8:45 a.m. Parents had mixed reactions.

Life Sciences - Environment - 12.12.2018
Why deep oceans gave life to the first big, complex organisms
Why deep oceans gave life to the first big, complex organisms
Why did the first big, complex organisms spring to life in deep, dark oceans where food was scarce? A new study finds great depths provided a stable, life-sustaining refuge from wild temperature swings in the shallows. Facebook Twitter Email In the beginning, life was small. For billions of years, all life on Earth was microscopic, consisting mostly of single cells.

Environment - Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
It’s in the genes - potential hope for pikas hit by climate change
As climate change drives mountain-dwelling pikas to higher altitudes, the animals can dial certain genes up or down to make the most of their cooler home's limited oxygen. Facebook Twitter Email As the climate changes, animals that can only survive in certain temperature ranges are being forced to relocate or perish.

Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
Belgian researchers present new beer bible
Belgian Beer: Tested and Tasted is not like other beer books. It's the result of 5 years of hard scientific work. The authors, Professor Kevin Verstrepen and researcher Miguel Roncoroni, analysed as many as 250 beers in their lab at the Leuven Institute for Beer Research and the VIB Centre for Microbiology.  "As scientists, we were frustrated with the fact that we had so little objective data to rely on," Professor Verstrepen explains his motivation.

Life Sciences - 12.12.2018
Attention, please! Anticipation of touch takes focus, executive skills
Attention, please! Anticipation of touch takes focus, executive skills
Anticipation is often viewed as an emotional experience, an eager wait for something to happen. Inside the brain, the act of anticipating is an exercise in focus, a neural preparation that conveys important visual, auditory or tactile information about what's to come. Now, brain research among 6- to 8-year-old children from the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences and Temple University shows not only this expectation in real time, but also how anticipation relates to executive function skills.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
Enrichment of resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants
Enrichment of resistance genes in wastewater treatment plants
Although wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) remove over 95 per cent of human fecal bacteria, many resistant bacteria can still be detected in the final effluent. How is this to be explained? To find out, a group led by microbiologist Helmut Bürgmann investigated the fate and expression of antibacterial resistance genes in the course of treatment at twelve WWTPs.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
How bacterial communities transport nutrients
How bacterial communities transport nutrients
Figuring out how bacteria bring in nutrients could point to ways of killing them without poison. More generally, this research could also reveal how small organisms cooperate by generating networks of flow patterns. Facebook Twitter Email Under threat of being scrubbed away with disinfectant, individual bacteria can improve their odds of survival by joining together to form colonies, called biofilms.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.12.2018
Gut hormone increases response to food
Ghrelin promotes conditioning to food-related odours The holiday season is a hard one for anyone watching their weight. The sights and smells of food are hard to resist. One factor in this hunger response is a hormone found in the stomach that makes us more vulnerable to tasty food smells, encouraging overeating and obesity.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 12.12.2018
Deep-learning technique reveals
Deep-learning technique reveals "invisible" objects in the dark
Method could illuminate features of biological tissues in low-exposure images. Small imperfections in a wine glass or tiny creases in a contact lens can be tricky to make out, even in good light. In almost total darkness, images of such transparent features or objects are nearly impossible to decipher.

Life Sciences - 11.12.2018
How skin cells protect themselves against stress
How skin cells protect themselves against stress
The skin is our largest organ, and, among other things, it provides protection against mechanical impacts. To ensure this protection, skin cells have to be connected to one another especially closely. Exactly how this mechanical stability is provided on the molecular level was unclear for a long time.

Life Sciences - 11.12.2018
Researchers create first sensor package that can ride aboard bees
Researchers create first sensor package that can ride aboard bees
Farmers can already use drones to soar over huge fields and monitor temperature, humidity or crop health. But these machines need so much power to fly that they can't get very far without needing a charge. Now, engineers at the University of Washington have created a sensing system that is small enough to ride aboard a bumblebee.

Life Sciences - Physics - 11.12.2018
Using water molecules to unlock neurons' secrets
EPFL researchers have developed a method to observe the electrical activity of neurons by analyzing the behavior of surrounding water molecules. This simple and non-invasive method, which could eliminate the need for electrodes and fluorophores, can be used to monitor the activity within a single neuron or potentially on an entire region of the brain.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.12.2018
What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health
What social stress in monkeys can tell us about human health
Research in recent years has linked a person's physical or social environment to their well-being. Stress wears down the body and compromises the immune system, leaving a person more vulnerable to illnesses and other conditions. Various stressors, from family adversity to air pollution, can lead to inflammation, diabetes and heart disease.
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