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Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2022
Ten organisations account for half of all animal research in Great Britain in 2021
Ten organisations account for half of all animal research in Great Britain in 2021
Today, 30 June 2022, Understanding Animal Research (UAR) has published a list of the ten organisations that carry out the highest number of animal procedures - those used in medical, veterinary, and scientific research - in Great Britain. These statistics are freely available on the organisations' websites as part of their ongoing commitment to transparency and openness around the use of animals in research.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 29.06.2022
Shining some light on the obscure proteome
Shining some light on the obscure proteome
Mass-spectrometry based proteomics is the big-data science of proteins that allows to monitor the abundances of thousands of proteins in a sample at once. It is therefore a particularly well suited readout to discover which proteins are targeted by any small molecule. An international research team has investigated this using chemical proteomics.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 29.06.2022
Blockchain not just for bitcoin: It can secure and store genomes, too
Blockchain not just for bitcoin: It can secure and store genomes, too
Blockchain is a digital technology that allows a secure and decentralized record of transactions that is increasingly used for everything from cryptocurrencies to artwork. But Yale researchers have found a new use for blockchain: they-ve leveraged the technology to give individuals control of their own genomes.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences - 29.06.2022
Changes in oceanographic fronts affect the gene flow among marine crab populations
Changes in oceanographic fronts affect the gene flow among marine crab populations
In the Mediterranean and the Atlantic, the intensity and location of the oceanographic fronts that limit the gene connectivity among populations of marine crabs vary over time. These dynamic changes, described in an article published in the journal Scientific Reports , alter the gene structure of the populations of marine crabs of commercial and gastronomic interest.

Life Sciences - 29.06.2022
’Safety in numbers’ tactic keeps Pacific salmon safe from predators
Animals that live in groups tend to be more protected from predators. That idea might be common sense, but it-s difficult to test for some species, especially for wild populations of fish that live in the ocean. A new University of Washington study that leverages historical data has found unique support for the -safety in numbers- hypothesis by showing that Pacific salmon in larger groups have lower risk of being eaten by predators.

Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Swarm vortex
Swarm vortex
Living in a collective offers fish many advantages - for example, more efficient locomotion Iain Couzin, a researcher at the Max Planck Institute for Behavioral Biology in Constance, and his team want to know what rules fish follow in a school and what advantages life in a collective offers. State-of-the-art technology is helping the researchers to find order in the great confusion.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Binge eating bye bye: Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded A group of researchers has found a completely new approach to treating eating disorders. The scientists have demonstrated that a group of nerve cells in the hypothalamus (known as AgRP, agouti-related peptide neurons) control the release of endogenous lysophospholipids, which in turn control the excitability of nerve cells in the cerebral cortex, stimulating food intake.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Maternal microbiome promotes healthy development of the baby
Maternal microbiome promotes healthy development of the baby
Researchers studying mice have found the first evidence of how a mother's gut microbes can help in the development of the placenta, and the healthy growth of the baby. This study, carried out in mice, identifies the maternal microbiome as a new player in the communication between mother, placenta and fetus.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Centenarians' offspring share their unique footprint
Centenarians’ offspring share their unique footprint
A genetic analysis of centenarians- descendants reveals a specific genetic footprint that may explain why they are less frail than descendants of non-centenarians of the same age. This is the main conclusion of a study led by the University of Valencia (UV), the CIBER for Fragility and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), and the Health Research Institute (INCLIVA) that has been published in The Journals of Gerontology .

Environment - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Colonising sea urchins can withstand hot, acidic seas
Marine biologists have found that black sea urchins in the Mediterranean Sea are remarkably tolerant of warm, acidic water. As a colonising species, the urchins' adaptability could lead to an ecological disaster in our climate change-impacted seas. In bubbling vents off the coast of Ischia, a volcanic island in the Gulf of Naples, lives a curious population of black sea urchins.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2022
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
The causes of intelligence impairment or epilepsy remain unexplained in more than 50 per cent of cases. Together with international colleagues, researchers at Leipzig University Hospital have discovered two genes with mutations that cause neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Their findings have now been published in scientific journals.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
New Genetic Associations in Pediatric NAFLD Affect Both Risk and Severity
Paired studies in children further identify differences between pediatric and adult diseases and may inform future treatments in a chronic childhood disease In a pair of overlapping studies, a diverse team of researchers, led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, have deepened investigations into the genetic origins of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children, describing multiple gene variants (including some previously unknown) that contribute to the risk of developing NAFLD and gene variants associated with the severity of the liver disease.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
Pre-natal exposure to alcohol: fathers may be partly responsible
Pre-natal exposure to alcohol: fathers may be partly responsible
In male mice, alcohol consumption in the weeks preceding conception affects the transcription of genes important for fetal development Preventing fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) has traditionally been seen as a maternal responsibility, but a growing body of research suggests that fathers have a responsibility as well.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
Top predators could ’trap’ themselves trying to adapt to climate change
As climate change alters environments across the globe, scientists have discovered that in response, many species are shifting the timing of major life events, such as reproduction. With an earlier spring thaw, for example, some flowers bloom sooner. But scientists don't know whether making these significant changes in life history will ultimately help a species survive or lead to bigger problems.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2022
Liver can control the brain and behavior
A new Yale study found that the liver plays a major role in regulating feeding behavior in mice, a discovery that could have implications for people with eating disorders and metabolic diseases. The study, which was done in collaboration with colleagues in Germany, also adds to a growing body of evidence that shows the most advanced part of the brain, the cerebral cortex, is affected by the rest of the body, not just the other way around.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.06.2022
Mass spectrometry-based draft of the mouse proteome
Mass spectrometry-based draft of the mouse proteome
Proteins control and organize almost every aspect of life. The totality of all proteins in a living organism, a tissue or a cell is called the proteome. Using mass spectrometry, researchers at the TUM School of Life Sciences characterize the proteome, or protein complement of the genome, in important model organisms.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.06.2022
With Roommates, It’s All About Chemistry, Molecularly Speaking
A survey of life indoors reveals that resident humans and microbes adapt to each other Within and upon every human being reside countless microorganisms — the microbiota that help shape and direct the lives of their hosts. A similar phenomenon occurs between people, microbes and the homes they share.

Life Sciences - Health - 24.06.2022
Importance of Selenium in the Opening Stages of Protein Synthesis
An international team of researchers with members from Freie Universität Berlin has made an important contribution to our understanding of the essential trace element selenium. The team was able to demonstrate how selenocysteine is incorporated into the proteins of eukaryotes. Using a specialized cryo-electron microscope, the researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin, the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics, Rutgers University, New Jersey, USA, and the University of Illinois, Chicago, USA, succeeded in visualizing the first steps in selenoprotein synthesis.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.06.2022
The University of Valencia and the CSIC patent a method to detect the COVID-19 virus and other pathogens using CRISPR
The University of Valencia and the CSIC patent a method to detect the COVID-19 virus and other pathogens using CRISPR
A research group from the Institute for Integrative Systems Biology (I2SysBio, UV-CSIC) has developed a method to detect viruses such as SARS-CoV-2, which causes COVID-19, using the CRISPR gene editing technique.

Life Sciences - 23.06.2022
Giant Bacteria Found in Guadeloupe Mangroves Challenge Traditional Concepts
Artistic rendering of Ca. Thiomargarita magnifica with dime. (Credit: Mangrove photo by Pierre Yves Pascal; Illustration by Susan Brand/Berkeley Lab) – By Massie S. Ballon At first glance, the slightly murky waters in the tube look like a scoop of stormwater, complete with leaves, debris, and even lighter threads in the mix.
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