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Earth Sciences - Materials Science - 07:01
Gaining insight into the energy balance of earthquakes
Gaining insight into the energy balance of earthquakes
Researchers at EPFL's Computational Solid Mechanics Laboratory and the Weizmann Institute of Science have modeled the onset of slip between two bodies in frictional contact. Their work, a major step forward in the study of frictional rupture, could give us a better understanding of earthquakes - including how far and fast they travel.

Materials Science - Health - 03.12.2019
Paradoxical replacement tissue for medicine
Paradoxical replacement tissue for medicine
A material that thickens when you pull on it seems to contradict the laws of physics. However, the so-called auxetic effect, which also occurs in nature, is interesting for a number of applications. A new Empa study recently published in "Nature Communications" shows how this amazing behavior can be improved - and even used to treat injuries and tissue damage.

Physics - Materials Science - 02.12.2019
When Solids and Liquids Meet: In Nanoscale Detail
When Solids and Liquids Meet: In Nanoscale Detail
Infrared technique at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source probes active chemistry at the solid-liquid interface How a liquid interacts with the surface of a solid is important in batteries and fuel cells, chemical production, corrosion phenomena, and many biological processes. To better understand this solid-liquid interface, researchers at Berkeley Lab developed a platform to explore these interactions under real conditions ("in situ") at the nanoscale using a technique that combines infrared light with an atomic force microscopy (AFM) probe.

Computer Science / Telecom - Materials Science - 02.12.2019
New Software Aims To Make Science More Replicable
Every field in science and engineering employs highly specialized equipment: surface area analyzers, nanosizers, recording membrane osmometers. This equipment is often incredibly specific, designed for just a single function, but it's essential for performing accurate, replicable research. And without the ability to replicate the research of other scientists, the validity of science itself falls apart.

Physics - Materials Science - 29.11.2019
Controlling the optical properties of solids with acoustic waves
Controlling the optical properties of solids with acoustic waves
Physicists from Switzerland, Germany, and France have found that large-amplitude acoustic waves, launched by ultrashort laser pulses, can dynamically manipulate the optical response of semiconductors. One of the main challenges in materials science research is to achieve high tunability of the optical properties of semiconductors at room temperature.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.11.2019
What protects killer immune cells from harming themselves?
White blood cells, which release a toxic potion of proteins to kill cancerous and virus-infected cells, are protected from any harm by the physical properties of their cell envelopes, find scientists from UCL and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. Until now, it has been a mystery to scientists how these white blood cells - called cytotoxic lymphocytes - avoid being killed by their own actions and the discovery could help explain why some tumours are more resistant than others to recently developed cancer immunotherapies.

Materials Science - Health - 22.11.2019
Protection for pacemakers
Protection for pacemakers
A protective membrane for cardiac pacemakers developed at ETH Zurich has proved successful in animal trials in reducing the undesirable build-up of fibrotic tissue around the implant. The next step is to test the protective membrane in patients. ETH scientists have developed a special protective membrane made of cellulose that significantly reduces the build-up of fibrotic tissue around cardiac pacemaker implants, as reported in the current issue of the journal Biomaterials.

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 21.11.2019
Eliminating cracks in 3D-printed metal components
Eliminating cracks in 3D-printed metal components
Researchers at EPFL have developed a new laser 3D-printing technique to manufacture metal components with unprecedented resistance to high temperature, damage and corrosion. The method has applications in fields ranging from aerospace to power-generating turbines. 3D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, has revolutionized the way components are made, setting new standards in terms of production speed when geometric complexity is high.

Materials Science - 21.11.2019
Software to speed up textile development
Software to speed up textile development
Whether for sports, at work or in the living room - depending on activity and environment, our clothing has to meet different demands. Empa scientists have developed a model that predicts how well a given garment will keep us warm. The crucial factor is the air cushion between our body and the outermost layer of clothing.

Physics - Materials Science - 20.11.2019
The Beauty of Imperfections: Linking Atomic Defects to 2D Materials' Electronic Properties
The Beauty of Imperfections: Linking Atomic Defects to 2D Materials’ Electronic Properties
Scientists at Berkeley Lab reveal oxygen's hidden talent for filling in atomic gaps in TMDs; and the surprising role of electron spin in conductivity Like any material, atomically thin, 2D semiconductors known as TMDs or transition metal dichalcogenides are not perfect, but their imperfections can actually be a good thing.

Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering - 18.11.2019
Alliance for additive manufacturing
Alliance for additive manufacturing
TUM, Oerlikon and Linde develop high-strength lightweight aluminum-based alloy New research alliance for additive manufacturing Together with the Swiss technology group Oerlikon and the industrial gas manufacturer Linde, the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has entered into a research alliance for additive manufacturing (AM).

Physics - Materials Science - 14.11.2019
New Material Breaks World Record Turning Heat into Electricity
New Material Breaks World Record Turning Heat into Electricity
A new type of material generates electrical current very efficiently from temperature differences. This allows sensors and small processors to supply themselves with energy wirelessly. Thermoelectric materials can convert heat into electrical energy. This is due to the so-called Seebeck effect: If there is a temperature difference between the two ends of such a material, electrical voltage can be generated and current can start to flow.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 14.11.2019
Lifelike chemistry created in lab search for ways to study origin of life
The researchers subjected their chemical soups to a form of selection by taking a small amount of material from one vial and placing it in a new vial with fresh pyrite and chemicals. After multiple generations, they found evidence of chemical networks, represented in yellow, spreading quick enough to avoid dilution.

Materials Science - History / Archeology - 13.11.2019
Finest handwork
Finest handwork
In autumn 2017, the archaeological service of the Canton of Berne was amazed when two private individuals delivered a crusted lump of metal. The bronze hand of PrÍles, decorated with a ribbon of gold, turned out to be the oldest bronze sculpture of a human body part in Central Europe. But where did the metals of the sensational find come from? Empa researchers were involved in the investigation.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 12.11.2019
A cheaper way to scale up atomic layer deposition
A cheaper way to scale up atomic layer deposition
Chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a new method for atomic layer deposition, a technique commonly used in high-quality microelectronics. The new method can be used in materials with larger surfaces much more cheaply than current approaches, while preserving quality and efficiency. Atomic layer deposition (ALD) involves stacking layers of atoms on top of each other like pancakes.

Materials Science - 12.11.2019
A fast and precise look into fibre-reinforced composites
A fast and precise look into fibre-reinforced composites
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have improved a method for small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to such an extent that it can now be used in the development or quality control of novel fibre-reinforced composites. This means that in the future, such materials can be investigated not only with X-rays from especially powerful sources such as the Swiss Light Source SLS, but also with those from conventional X-ray tubes.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 07.11.2019
Go With the Flow: Scientists Design Better Batteries for a Renewable Energy Grid
Go With the Flow: Scientists Design Better Batteries for a Renewable Energy Grid
New blueprint for affordable, sustainable 'flow batteries' developed at Berkeley Lab could accelerate an electrical grid powered by the sun and wind How do you store renewable energy so it's there when you need it, even when the sun isn't shining or the wind isn't blowing? Giant batteries designed for the electrical grid - called flow batteries, which store electricity in tanks of liquid electrolyte - could be the answer, but so far utilities have yet to find a cost-effective battery that can reliably power thousands of homes throughout a lifecycle of 10 to 20 years.

Materials Science - Transport - 07.11.2019
UK needs to act to prevent electric vehicle battery waste mountain - new study
Recycling technologies for end-of-life lithium ion batteries (LIBs) are not keeping pace with the rapid rise of electric vehicles, storing up a potentially huge waste management problem for the future, according to a new study. A review of lithium ion battery recycling led by the University of Birmingham suggests that, while electric vehicles (EVs) offer a solution for cutting pollution, governments and industry need to act now to develop a robust recycling infrastructure to meet future recycling need.

Physics - Materials Science - 05.11.2019
World-Leading Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atoms in Their 'Neighborhoods'
World-Leading Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atoms in Their ’Neighborhoods’
Taking the technology to low temperatures could enable advances in materials science and other fields By Jessica Scully Researchers use electron microscopy to produce high-resolution images at the atomic scale of everything from composite nanomaterials to single proteins. The technology provides invaluable information on the texture, chemistry, and structure of these materials.

Physics - Materials Science - 05.11.2019
4D-STEM Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atomic 'Neighborhoods'
4D-STEM Microscopes Take Candid Snapshots of Atomic ’Neighborhoods’
Scientists use powerful 4D-STEM electron microscopy technique to map out the best atomic 'hangouts' in high-performance materials W e can directly see the hidden world of atoms thanks to electron microscopes, first developed in the 1930s. Today, electron microscopes, which use beams of electrons to illuminate and magnify a sample, have become even more sophisticated, allowing scientists to take real-world snapshots of materials with a resolution of less than half the diameter of a hydrogen atom.
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