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Politics - Psychology - 27.11.2018
Complex systems help explain how democracy is destabilised
Complex systems help explain how democracy is destabilised
Complex systems theory is usually used to study things like the immune system, global climate, ecosystems, transportation or communications systems. But with global politics becoming more unpredictable - highlighted by the UK's vote for Brexit and the presidential elections of Donald Trump in the USA and Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil - it is being used to examine the stability of democracies.

Politics - 07.11.2018
Nearly one in three Germans support xenophobic views; prejudice against individual groups on the rise
Nearly one in three Germans support xenophobic views; prejudice against individual groups on the rise
Leipzig Authoritarianism Study 2018: presentation of long-term study with current results on authoritarian and far-right attitudes in Germany Xenophobia has again increased in Germany. Almost one in two respondents in eastern Germany agrees with certain xenophobic statements, for example that foreigners are exploiting the German welfare state or swamping the Federal Republic.

Administration - Politics - 01.11.2018
Gun safety is a top issue for California voters
With the midterm elections less than a week away, a new poll by Stanford scholars shows that California voters are more passionate about voting in this campaign than in previous elections, with 83 percent of respondents planning to vote. With the midterm elections a few days away, gun safety is top of mind for California voters, according to a new poll by Stanford scholars.

Politics - 30.10.2018
Brexit is trigger word for doom and gloom among Westminster tweeters
A new study from the University of Nottingham has revealed the Twitter habits of UK politicians and how they use social media to influence and participate in public debate. Dr Roderick MacKenzie from the Faculty of Engineering conducted the research over a 12-month period, while based as a parliamentary fellow in the House of Commons Library.

Politics - 24.10.2018
Politics interferes with the ability to assess expertise
Learning about someone's political beliefs interferes with a person's ability to assess expertise, as people judge like-minded peers as being more expert in fields completely unrelated to politics, finds a new UCL-led study. In the paper, published in Cognition , the researchers found that people turned to peers with similar political views for help on a shape categorisation task that had nothing to do with politics, instead of seeking help from someone who was doing better at the shape categorisation task but didn't share their political leanings.

Politics - 21.10.2018
Refining the
Refining the "science" of political science
Teppei Yamamoto examines the methods of his discipline, to help scholars nail down cause and effect. Political pundits are usually confident about their ability to identify why citizens think the way they do. Look at cable television or the internet, and you'll find someone attributing an election result to economic anxiety, or claiming the latest polling numbers reflect a recent news story.

Politics - 09.10.2018
Elections: Understanding democracy in a divided America
Elections are a pillar of American democracy. But for many Americans today, our democratic process feels under siege. A divided electorate and intense partisanship have led to a tense public mood where feelings of polarization run deep. People are now more attached to their party affiliation than any other social identifier - like race and religion - according to Stanford scholar Shanto Iyengar.

Life Sciences - Politics - 12.09.2018
Corruption is Hard to Hide if You’re a Politician Whose Face is Wide
An old joke says if you want to know if a politician is lying, see if their lips are moving. New research shows that people can predict something about a politician's honesty just by looking at them, but it's not the lips they're noticing. A series of studies conducted by Caltech researchers show that when people are shown photos of politicians they're not familiar with, they can make better-than-chance judgments about whether those politicians have been convicted of corruption.

Politics - 05.09.2018
Swedish election second only to US in proportion of ’junk news’ shared
Research from the Oxford Internet Institute has found that the proportion of 'junk news' shared on social media during the ongoing Swedish election campaign is higher than any other European country studied - and second only to the US in recent major elections. With Sweden going to the polls on 9 September, the study shows that Swedish social media users have shared two links to professional news content for every one link to junk news, with junk sources accounting for 22% of all URLs shared with political hashtags.

Politics - Law / Forensics - 07.08.2018
Visa restrictions can lead to increase in illegal migration
While Government-imposed restrictions on immigration can reduce overall migration, they can also be ineffective or even counterproductive, pushing more would-be migrants into unauthorised channels, finds new UCL-led research in collaboration with Royal Holloway and University of Birmingham. The study, published today in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , investigated how individuals are likely to move from one country to another based on varying levels of restriction.

Social Sciences - Politics - 01.08.2018
Differences in social status and politics encourage paranoid thinking
Differences in social status and political belief increase paranoid interpretations of other people's actions, finds a new UCL experimental study. Paranoia is the tendency to assume other people are trying to harm you when their actual motivations are unclear, and this tendency is increased when interacting with someone of a higher social status or opposing political beliefs, according to the study published today in Royal Society Open Science .

Careers / Employment - Politics - 30.07.2018
Decline in working class politicians, shifted Labour towards right wing policy
The decline in working-class MPs and rise of career politicians shifted the Labour Party towards a more right wing policy stance on welfare, according to a new study by UCL. The research, published in Comparative Political Studies , examined the policy preferences of working-class and career politicians within the Labour Party both pre and during Tony Blair's leadership of the Labour Party. The study shows that working-class MPs were substantially more in favour of traditional welfare policies than their careerist colleagues.

Politics - Careers / Employment - 05.07.2018
Barriers continue to prevent potential Assembly candidates from standing, report concludes
Action is needed to encourage a wider range of people from underrepresented groups to enter politics, academics say. The team from Cardiff University's Wales Governance Centre and London Metropolitan University studied what motivates and discourages people from considering running for election to the National Assembly.

Politics - Administration - 11.05.2018
People power
People power
In politics, your voices make a difference. At least at the state level of U.S. politics, that is. A new study co-authored by an MIT political scientist shows that state policies in the U.S. from 1936 through 2014 have been responsive to public opinion - and have become even more aligned with it in recent decades.

Politics - 24.04.2018
Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East Africa
Climate change not the key driver of human conflict and displacement in East Africa
Over the last 50 years climate change has not been the key driver of the human displacement or conflict in East Africa, rather it is politics and poverty, according to new research by UCL. Human displacement refers to the total number of forcibly displaced people, and includes internally displaced people - the largest group represented - and refugees, those forced to across international borders. "Terms such as climate migrants and climate wars have increasingly been used to describe displacement and conflict, however these terms imply that climate change is the main cause.

Politics - Media - 17.04.2018
Study looks at social media humour during US election
New research from The Australian National University (ANU) has looked at the use of humour on Twitter during the 2016 US Presidential election. The study found that 35 per cent of election related posts used humour, and that Hillary Clinton supporters were almost three times more likely to use jokes than Donald Trump supporters.

Politics - Psychology - 12.04.2018
Superiority complex? People who claim superior beliefs exaggerate their own knowledge
ANN ARBOR-No one likes smug knowit-all friends, relatives or co-workers who believe their knowledge and beliefs are superior to others. But now these discussions at the dinner table, bar or office might be less annoying. A new University of Michigan study indicates what many people suspect: these know-it-all people are especially prone to overestimating what they actually know.

Politics - Social Sciences - 29.03.2018
Biracial youth’s political views, self-identification examined
With the mixed-race population rapidly increasing in the United States, Stanford political scientist Lauren Davenport says it's important to figure out what factors shape this group's political attitudes and self-identification. Biracial youth who identify with the races of both of their parents tend to be more socially progressive and liberal than their peers who are of a single racial background, according to new research from a Stanford political scientist.

Politics - 14.03.2018
Could anti-Trump sentiment mobilize African-American voters in 2018?
African-American voters who dislike and feel threatened by Donald Trump and his presidency are much more likely to vote and to engage with politics, according to new research from California State University, Sacramento, and the University of Washington. The findings, the researchers say, indicate sentiment against Trump and his policies creates an opportunity for African-American mobilization as the country heads toward the 2018 midterm elections.

Religions - Politics - 07.02.2018
Better Knowledge of Evolution Leads to Greater Acceptance of the Concept
Better Knowledge of Evolution Leads to Greater Acceptance of the Concept
Prevailing theories about evolution state that belief in the concept is tied only to a person's politics, religion or both. But according to new research out of the University of Pennsylvania published in BioScience , the journal of the American Institute of Biology, whether Americans accept or reject the subject also depends on how well they understand it.
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