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Politics - 17.03.2020
Has a Bristol mayor made a difference?
Mayoral governance in Bristol has boosted the visibility of city leadership and helped promote Bristol on the national and international stage, a new study has found. The research by UWE Bristol and the University of Bristol also showed the mayoral model of leadership had unnecessarily restricted the role of councillors and reduced citizens' belief in their ability to influence decisions.

History / Archeology - Politics - 16.03.2020
Five things to ’dig’ about heritage at Durham
Our researchers are the history detectives, unearthing exciting things from our past and helping us learn from our ancestors. We are also the home to important cultural archives available for study. Here's From finding long a lost medieval chapel fit for a king, to discovering documents from our royal past.

Politics - 13.02.2020
What is love?
From the fields of science to sociology, politics and philosophy, here is what Stanford research says about love and romance, in the past and present day.   For centuries, people have tried to understand the behaviors and beliefs associated with falling in love. What explains the wide range of emotions people experience? How have notions of romance evolved over time? As digital media becomes a permanent fixture in people's lives, how have these technologies changed how people meet? Examining some of these questions are Stanford scholars.

Politics - 11.02.2020
Meet our new faculty: David Broockman, political science
Name: David Broockman Degrees: B.A., Yale University, 2011; Ph.D., UC Berkeley, 2015 Research interests: I study how voters and politicians make decisions, generally using real-world field experiments that allow for rigorous causal inferences. My recent research focuses on voter persuasion and how to measure how well voters' views are represented.

Politics - 05.02.2020
Is it possible to reduce political polarization?
Channels McGill University News and Events In the run-up to the 2016 U.S. presidential election, an unusual experiment suggested that it might be possible to influence American voters to adopt less polarized positions. Posing as political researchers, a research team from McGill and Lund Universities approached 136 voters at the first Donald Trump and Hilary Clinton presidential debate in New York.

Politics - 24.01.2020
Third Reich's legacy tied to present-day xenophobia and political intolerance
Third Reich’s legacy tied to present-day xenophobia and political intolerance
Who - or what - is to blame for the  xenophobia, political intolerance and radical political parties spreading through Germany and the rest of Europe? A new study from Rice University and Washington University in St. Louis shows a major factor is people's proximity to former Nazi concentration camps.

Physics - Politics - 21.01.2020
Uses physics to explain democratic elections
Uses physics to explain democratic elections
U.S. elections have become more "unstable," sometimes swinging in the opposite direction from the greater electorate's preferences. It may seem surprising, but theories and formulas derived from physics turn out to be useful tools for understanding the ways democratic elections work, including how these systems break down and how they could be improved.

Politics - Business / Economics - 17.12.2019
Female MPs more vocal under female leadership
Female MPs are roughly 20% more vocal in parliamentary debates where the cabinet minister is female than when the responsible minister is male, finds a new study by UCL. The research, published in the British Journal of Political Science , is the first to consider whether female leadership affects the processes or outcomes of political debate.

Environment - Politics - 02.12.2019
What's driving erosion worldwide?
What’s driving erosion worldwide?
ETH Zurich researchers are reexamining the causes of soil erosion around the world - and have found that countries themselves have a surprisingly strong influence on their soil. This country effect was previously undetected. Soil erosion is a global problem that threatens food security and the functioning of ecosystems.

Social Sciences - Politics - 21.11.2019
Growing diversity does not increase votes for anti-immigration candidates
Growing diversity does not increase votes for anti-immigration candidates
Donald Trump's anti-immigration views were a feature of his 2016 presidential campaign. To what extent was his unexpected victory driven by voters' anger over immigrants moving into their neighborhoods, attending their children's schools, or working in local businesses? Not at all, according to a new study co-authored by Yale political scientist Gregory A. Huber.

Politics - 11.11.2019
Conflict of Interest Disclosures Don’t Alter the Recommendations of Peer Reviewers
The majority of high-quality medical and science journals require disclosure of possible conflicts of interest (COI). However, a new study suggests that such disclosures have no impact on journal reviewers, even when the authors of submitted papers did, in fact, report conflicts. The study also found that reviewers' evaluations of seven additional measures of different facets of research quality (e.g., methods, conclusions, objectivity) were similarly unaffected by COI disclosures.

Social Sciences - Politics - 31.10.2019
Hindu kids more apt to echo propaganda that ’Indian equals Hindu’
Muslim and Hindu students at Zenith School in Vadodara in India. (Photo courtesy of Mahesh Srinivasan) With a multi-faith population of some 1.3 billion, India claims to be the world's largest secular democracy. But when it comes to the question of who is a true Indian, the country's Hindu children are more likely than their Muslim peers to connect their faith to their national identity, according to new research from UC Berkeley.

Electroengineering - Politics - 21.10.2019
Direct Current Can Amp Up Existing Transmission Lines
The U.S. energy system has seen sweeping changes in the past two decades. Natural gas replaced coal as the dominant fossil source of power generation, and wind and solar energy now contribute roughly 9% of the nation's electricity, compared to almost none 20 years ago. Because of these changes, less carbon is being emitted by the power sector per unit of electricity produced.

Politics - 16.10.2019
Renewing Political Speech and Speech writing report launched at Parliament
Politicians need to get people to trust them more if they want their speeches to be heard says a new report launched by the University of Birmingham and the University of East Anglia. The research project " The Crisis of Rhetoric: Renewing Political Speech and Speechwriting " argues that public debate and the freedom to make arguments and counterarguments are essential for democracy.

Politics - 19.09.2019
How carbon taxes can succeed
How carbon taxes can succeed
The political leeway for carbon taxes is greater than commonly assumed. Political scientists at ETH have shown how carbon taxes could find acceptance in Germany and the US. What matters most is the intended use of the tax revenues and that all industrialised nations implement the taxes. Useful to fight climate change, but politically risky: carbon taxes are widely regarded as a double-edged sword.

Politics - 02.09.2019
Identity ’fusion’ with political leader gives rise to extremism
People whose identity is "fused" with that of a political leader are more likely to take extreme positions or commit violence on behalf of the leader, new studies by researchers at Yale and University of Oslo have found. Followers of Donald Trump who have fused - or experience a deep sense of oneness - with the president are more likely to support use of violence to challenge an election result, persecute Iranians or other immigrants, and support a ban on Muslims, according to a compilation of seven studies published Sept.

Politics - 29.07.2019
WhatsApp both strengthens and undermines Nigerian democracy, says UK-Nigeria research team
Research findings were released today by a UK-Nigerian research team examining the role of WhatsApp in Nigeria's 2019 elections. Drawing on citizen surveys and interviews with political campaigns, the report underlines the ways in which WhatsApp has promoted the spread of “fake news” around elections, but has also strengthened accountability and promoted inclusion in other areas.

Environment - Politics - 04.07.2019
Trade agreements only partly shift environmental burden onto poorer countries
Trade agreements only partly shift environmental burden onto poorer countries
Is trade liberalisation shifting environmental burden from industrialised countries to poorer ones' This question was investigated by a research team at ETH Zurich led by Thomas Bernauer. In particular, they analysed whether, and if so how, commerce driven by free trade agreements is transferring environmental impacts from industrialised countries to poorer ones.

Social Sciences - Politics - 27.06.2019
UK-first as £960,000 project explores integration in Bristol
A unique new project led by the University of Bristol has received a £960,000 boost to improve integration across Bristol by exploring how its citizens and communities share spaces and move around the city. University researchers on the 'Everyday Integration' project, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), will work with Bristol City Council and 29 community partners to identify existing best-practice and better understand how to overcome the various barriers people currently face.

Environment - Politics - 12.06.2019
Does climate change cause armed conflict?
A new study finds that climate has affected the risk of armed conflict. Though other drivers of violence were found to be substantially more influential, as global temperatures continue to rise, the changing climate is expected to further amplify the risk of conflict. Can a changing climate trigger organised armed conflict, such as civil war, or make it more severe?
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