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Psychology - Health - 26.09.2022
Screening for pregnancy anxiety in the first and third trimesters can help reduce early births
Screening for pregnancy anxiety in the first and third trimesters can help reduce early births
Key takeaways Pregnancy anxiety is associated with shorter gestation times and earlier births. Screening during the first and third trimesters could help reduce early births. Latina women may experience higher levels of pregnancy anxiety than other groups. A new UCLA study has found anxiety specific to pregnancy and childbirth is associated with shorter gestation times and earlier births.

Health - Psychology - 20.09.2022
Monkeypox linked to encephalitis or confusion in some patients
Monkeypox linked to encephalitis or confusion in some patients
Monkeypox can sometimes lead to neurological complications such as encephalitis (brain inflammation), confusion or seizures, finds a new review of evidence led by a UCL researcher. Several studies incorporated in the systematic review and meta-analysis of evidence, published in eClinicalMedicine , also found that muscle aches, fatigue, headache, anxiety and depression were all relatively common among monkeypox patients.

Sport - Psychology - 19.09.2022
Fit for work at over 50
Fit for work at over 50
Researchers at the University of Bonn have developed program to increase performance and well-being Am I over the hill? This question comes up regularly among workers over 50. A common prejudice is that older people's efficiency and stress-tolerance are continuously decreasing. But mental performance, self-confidence, psychological resilience and well-being can be improved in the 50-plus generation.

Psychology - 19.09.2022
Don't look at me like that!
Don’t look at me like that!
Does eye-contact always attract attention? Not in every case, as a research team at the University of Würzburg's Institute of Psychology has recently shown. Why not? Because context matters. It's a phenomenon that we have probably all experienced. You're in a packed place surrounded by a swirling mass of people, and someone looks you in the eye.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 15.09.2022
The hemispheres are not equal
A study analyzes differences in brain asymmetry among different individuals Although the brain is divided into two halves, it is not exactly a mirror image. Some functions are processed more on the left side, others more on the right - and each person's processing is a little different. Scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences and Forschungszentrum Juelich, together with an international team of neuroscientists, have now discovered heritable underpinnings of brain asymmetry - and - how much we share with monkeys.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 13.09.2022
How the brain focuses on what’s in mind
When holding information in mind, neural activity is more focused when and where there are bursts of gamma frequency rhythms. Working memory, that handy ability to consciously hold and manipulate new information in mind, takes work. In particular, participating neurons in the prefrontal cortex have to work together in synchrony to focus our thoughts, whether we-re remembering a set of directions or tonight's menu specials.

Health - Psychology - 12.09.2022
Compassion: An incentive does not always help
Compassion: An incentive does not always help
People who help others do not necessarily want to receive a reward for doing so. However, a reward can encourage people with a low degree of empathy to help. This is shown by a new study . It is a classic of social psychological research: people donate less blood when they are paid for it. Without payment, i.e., solely out of the desire to help their fellow human beings, they have significantly more blood drawn.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 12.09.2022
Actions speak louder than words when it comes to memory
PhD candidate in psychology publishes meta-analysis that chronicles 60 years of memory research By Wendy Philpott Faculty of Arts Whether you're old or young, memory can be a challenge for all kinds of reasons, and most of us would welcome strategies to help improve our memory. Waterloo's researchers in psychology have been helping with this area of cognition for years - and the impact of their research on what we know about memory continues with graduate students.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 09.09.2022
Food insecurity has lasting impacts on the brains and behavior of mice
Food insecurity is a growing problem in America. A new UC Berkeley study found that mice raised in situations of food insecurity exhibited changes in behavior and in the brain's reward network, raising questions about the long-lasting effects of food insecurity among young people. (Graphic courtesy of Univ.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 06.09.2022
Mariska Kret: 'The arrogance of thinking we're better than animals is downright stupid'
Mariska Kret: ’The arrogance of thinking we’re better than animals is downright stupid’
Professor of Cognitive Psychology Mariska Kret studies how humans and animals express emotions. Comparisons between humans and great apes offer important evolutionary insights, Kret will say in her inaugural lecture on Friday 9 September. Many of us still think humans are unique and 'shine at the top of evolution,' says Kret.

Environment - Psychology - 02.09.2022
Climate anxiety an important driver for climate action - new study
A study from CAST finds that whilst climate anxiety is low amongst the UK public, it may be an important driver of climate action such as cutting down on waste. The first-ever detailed study of climate anxiety among the UK adult population suggests that whilst rates are currently low, people's fears about the future of the planet might be an important trigger for action when it comes to adapting our high-carbon lifestyles to become more environmentally friendly.

Microtechnics - Psychology - 31.08.2022
Robots can be used to assess children's mental wellbeing
Robots can be used to assess children’s mental wellbeing
Robots can be better at detecting mental wellbeing issues in children than parent-reported or self-reported testing, a new study suggests. Children might see the robot as a confidante - they feel like they won't get into trouble if they share secrets with it Nida Itrat Abbasi A team of roboticists, computer scientists and psychiatrists from the University of Cambridge carried out a study with 28 children between the ages of eight and 13, and had a child-sized humanoid robot administer a series of standard psychological questionnaires to assess the mental wellbeing of each participant.

Life Sciences - Psychology - 30.08.2022
How value shapes the fluctuations of conscious perception
How value shapes the fluctuations of conscious perception
Although visual perception might seem as easy as just opening our eyes and reporting what is out there, the underlying computations are surprisingly complex. One of the more revealing ways to study these computations is by using inputs that are ambiguous or even impossible under normal circumstances (for instance with radically different pictures seen by the two eyes).

Health - Psychology - 29.08.2022
Sensor-based early detection of age-related diseases from home
Sensor-based early detection of age-related diseases from home
Researchers at the University of Bern and Inselspital, Bern University Hospital have demonstrated how sensors that record movement patterns could help detect health problems in the elderly, including old-age depression, risk of falls or cognitive impairment, at an early stage. In the future, this could help seniors to live a self-determined life at home for longer and relieve increasing pressure on the healthcare system.

Psychology - 26.08.2022
Brothers and sisters shape character less than thought
Brothers and sisters shape character less than thought
Our personality as adults is not determined by whether we grow up with sisters or brothers. This is the finding of an international study by researchers from Leipzig University, the University of Zurich and Victoria University of Wellington, New Zealand. The results have now been published in the renowned journal -Psychological Science-.

Psychology - Health - 25.08.2022
Appetite change in depression
Appetite change in depression
New study published on changes in the brain's reward system Major depressive disorders are characterized by a significant health burden, including changes in appetite and body weight. Identifying biomarkers such as changes in brain function to treat depression is difficult due to the varying symptomatology of affected individuals.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 24.08.2022
Using digital media to relax is related to lower-quality parenting
Using digital media to relax is related to lower-quality parenting
Negative parenting behaviours more likely when technology interrupts family interactions Caregivers who consume digital media for relaxation are more likely to engage in negative parenting practices, according to a new multinational study. The new study led by the University of Waterloo aimed to investigate the relationship between caregivers' use of digital media, mental health, and parenting practices at the start of the COVID-19 pandemic.

Health - Psychology - 24.08.2022
Breaking stereotype: Brain models are not one-size-fits-all
Machine learning has helped scientists understand how the brain gives rise to complex human characteristics, uncovering patterns of brain activity that are related to behaviors like working memory, traits like impulsivity, and disorders like depression. And with these tools, scientists can create models of these relationships that can then be used, in theory, to make predictions about the behavior and health of individuals.

Psychology - Computer Science - 23.08.2022
Show me your Twitter feed and I’ll tell you what your problem is
Data scientist Marijn ten Thij studies human behaviour on the basis of messages posted on social media. For example, he mapped the changing mood during the corona pandemic using 3.5 million tweets. The analysis of this kind of data is not only socially relevant, it could also help individuals in psychological distress.

Psychology - Health - 23.08.2022
Laat me je Twitterfeed zien en ik vertel je wat je probleem is
Data scientist Marijn ten Thij studies human behaviour on the basis of messages posted on social media. For example, he mapped the changing mood during the corona pandemic using 3.5 million tweets. The analysis of this kind of data is not only socially relevant, it could also help individuals in psychological distress.
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