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History / Archeology - Religions - 09.09.2019
Skeletons yield clues about 19th-century immigrant life in New Haven
Skeletons yield clues about 19th-century immigrant life in New Haven
On July 12, 2011, a human bone was discovered jutting from a drainage trench at a construction site at Yale New Haven Hospital. The New Haven police and state coroner were called, but it was no crime scene. Michael Massella, a security officer on duty at the hospital, contacted his co-worker Anthony Griego, a retired New Haven police officer and local historian.

History / Archeology - Religions - 28.08.2019
German Research Foundation awards funding to a University of Münster excavation project
German Research Foundation awards funding to a University of Münster excavation project
For more than 20 years, the staff of the Asia Minor Research Centre at the Department of Ancient History of Münster University has been investigating the cultural legacy of the ancient city of Doliche in south-eastern Turkey. The German Research Foundation (DFG) is now funding the project with around 800,000 euros for a further three years.

Religions - 08.04.2019
More than 900 reports of potential modern slavery in hand car washes recorded through app
Drivers using a pioneering app to gather information on modern slavery in hand car washes made more than 900 reports of potential cases over a five-month period, according to research published today. The Safe Car Wash app, which allows drivers to respond to a check list of key factors that may suggest modern slavery or labour exploitation in hand car washes, has been downloaded 8,225 times since its launch by the Church of England and the Catholic Church in England and Wales last year.

Religions - Law - 01.04.2019
Vast majority of NSW hate crimes race and religion related: study
A new University of Sydney study provides the most comprehensive picture of the patterns of hate crime in Australia to date. It has revealed the prevalence of race and religion-based hate crimes, and that people of Asian, Indian/Pakistani and Muslim backgrounds are the most frequent victims. Hate crime - also referred to as 'bias crime' - is crime that is motivated by prejudice, bias or hatred towards a presumed characteristic of the victim, such as race, religion, sexual orientation, disability status or gender identity.

Religions - History / Archeology - 27.03.2019
Voices from Beyond
Voices from Beyond
The voice is a fleeting medium. As the primary means of human communication, it also plays an important role in religion. And yet it is difficult to grasp and seems to elude discussion. But a research project at the Cluster of Excellence has nonetheless approached the voice in a religious context: scholars from various disciplines have studied the voice as a medium of religious communication, and have discovered in historical testimonies, as well as in literature and artwork from various religions and cultures from antiquity to the present day, what can be called "voices from beyond".

Social Sciences - Religions - 30.10.2018
AI systems shed light on root cause of religious conflict
Artificial intelligence can help us to better understand the causes of religious violence and to potentially control it, according to a new Oxford University collaboration. The study is one of the first to be published that uses psychologically realistic AI - as opposed to machine learning. The research published in The Journal for Artificial Societies and Social Stimulation , combines computer modelling and cognitive psychology to create an AI system able to mimic human religiosity.

Religions - 12.09.2018
Religious background more important than faith education for academic success
The academic advantages associated with a faith school education are short lived, and are mainly explained by home background, new research from UCL shows. UCL Institute of Education (IOE) researchers analysed data on more than 10,000 people born in England and Wales in a single week in 1970, who are taking part in the 1970 British Cohort Study.  The research looked at whether faith schools, across both the state and private sectors, gave an academic advantage to their pupils at O level, A level, and at university.

Life Sciences - Religions - 07.08.2018
Lost Norse of Greenland fuelled the medieval ivory trade, ancient walrus DNA suggests
Lost Norse of Greenland fuelled the medieval ivory trade, ancient walrus DNA suggests
New DNA analysis reveals that, before their mysterious disappearance, the Norse colonies of Greenland had a "near monopoly" on Europe's walrus ivory supply. An overreliance on this trade may have contributed to Norse Greenland's collapse when the medieval market declined. The very thing which gave the society its initial resilience, may have also contained the seeds of its vulnerability James Barrett The Icelandic Sagas tell of Erik the Red: exiled for murder in the late 10th century he fled to southwest Greenland, establishing its first Norse settlement.

Religions - 18.07.2018
Secular countries can expect future economic growth, confirms new study
New research measuring the importance of religion in 109 countries spanning the entire 20th century has reignited an age-old debate around the link between secularisation and economic growth. The study, published in Science Advances, has shown that a decline in religion influences a country's future economic prosperity.

Religions - 15.06.2018
Hindu and Muslim children show unexpected religious tolerance
Hindu and Muslim children show unexpected religious tolerance
In a region of India with a long history of tension between Hindus and Muslims, children of different faiths are showing unexpected tolerance for one another's religious beliefs and customs, according to a new study led by UC Berkeley psychologist Mahesh Srinivasan. Researchers surveyed approximately 100 Hindu and Muslim children aged between 9 and 15 at two different schools in Gujarat, India, the site of violent Hindu-Muslim conflict in 2002 .

Religions - 22.05.2018
Health experts in Birmingham and Guangzhou set up research institute
The King James Bible, first published in 1611, has been found to have been translated by a Frenchman - according to three sources newly discovered by a University of Birmingham researcher. Although the King James Bible went on to become the most popular translation throughout the English-speaking world, the circumstances surrounding its production have always been mysterious.

Religions - Pedagogy - 17.04.2018
Religiously engaged adolescents demonstrate habits that help them get better grades
Study suggests that being religious helps adolescents get better grades because they are rewarded for being conscientious and cooperative. Adolescents who practice religion on a regular basis do better in school than those who are religiously disengaged, according to new research from Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE).

Religions - Politics - 07.02.2018
Better Knowledge of Evolution Leads to Greater Acceptance of the Concept
Better Knowledge of Evolution Leads to Greater Acceptance of the Concept
Prevailing theories about evolution state that belief in the concept is tied only to a person's politics, religion or both. But according to new research out of the University of Pennsylvania published in BioScience , the journal of the American Institute of Biology, whether Americans accept or reject the subject also depends on how well they understand it.

Social Sciences - Religions - 05.12.2017
Storytellers promoted co-operation among hunter-gatherers before advent of religion
Storytellers promoted co-operation among hunter-gatherers before advent of religion
Storytelling promoted co-operation in hunter-gatherers prior to the advent of organised religion, a new UCL study reveals. The research shows that hunter-gatherer storytellers were essential in promoting co-operative and egalitarian values before comparable mechanisms evolved in larger agricultural societies, such as moralising high-gods.

History / Archeology - Religions - 05.12.2017
Could ancient bones suggest Santa was real?
New Oxford University research has revealed that bones long venerated as relics of the saint, do in fact date from the right historical period. One of the most revered Christian saints, St Nicholas' remains are held in the Basilica di San Nicola, Bari, Southern Puglia, since 1087, where they are buried in a crypt beneath a marble altar, with others preserved in the Chiesa di San Nicolo al Lido in Venice.

Religions - 01.12.2017
HUST and Birmingham work on plans for joint research institute
Twenty years on from the first major report on Islamophobia, a new report involving University of Birmingham research recommends that all parts of society call out prejudice and discrimination experienced by and suffered by Muslims. The report, produced by the Runnymede Trust with contributions from the University of Birmingham and a number of other UK universities, finds that Muslims face huge disadvantages in the jobs market, despite more Muslims going to university than ever - including more Muslim women graduates than men.

Religions - Social Sciences - 06.10.2017
Religion and social factors top IVF concerns
Although one in 8 couples experience fertility issues and many of them turn to Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) to help them have a child, usage varies significantly across Europe. A new Oxford study has shed light on some of the reasons behind this - pinpointing moral and social acceptance of the treatment and religion as key.

Social Sciences - Religions - 06.10.2017
Social factors top IVF concerns
Although one in 8 couples experience fertility issues and many of them turn to Assisted Reproductive Technologies (ART) to help them have a child, usage varies significantly across Europe. A new Oxford study has shed light on some of the reasons behind this - pinpointing moral and social acceptance of the treatment and religion as key.

Religions - 21.09.2017
University of Birmingham backs cultural discussion series
The earliest Latin Commentary on the Gospels, lost for over 1500 years, has been rediscovered and made available in English for the first time. The work, which was written by a bishop in North Italy, Fortunatianus of Aquileia, dates back to the middle of the fourth century. Despite references to it in other ancient works, no copy was known to survive until a researcher from the University of Salzburg identified the commentary in an anonymous manuscript copied around the year 800 and held in Cologne Cathedral Library.

Religions - 31.08.2017
Reformation Rebels: The surprising histories of Benedictine monks in exile
Reformation Rebels: The surprising histories of Benedictine monks in exile (31 August 2017) Sixteenth and seventeenth century Benedictine monks refused abstinence, died in duels, went off to war and spread illegal Catholic doctrine, a new study has revealed. The Monks in Motion project, led by Dr James Kelly of the Department of Theology and Religion , has brought together records of English and Welsh Benedictine monks exiled in Europe in a first-of-its-kind searchable database and uncovered some of their remarkable histories.
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