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Health - Social Sciences - 03.07.2020
Levels of depression and anxiety higher amongst those from BAME backgrounds during lockdown
People from BAME backgrounds have had higher levels of depression and anxiety throughout the Covid-19 lockdown, as well as lower levels of happiness and life satisfaction, finds UCL's Covid-19 Social Study. In addition, whilst 21% of people from white backgrounds have reported being often lonely during lockdown, this figure has been 23% amongst those from BAME backgrounds.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 02.07.2020
Greater support needed for carers of autistic children during lockdown
Families of autistic children have been greatly impacted by lockdown reveals a study by UCL, the University of East London and the University of Bedfordshire. It found that despite the relaxed legislation on lockdown measures for autistic people brought into effect in April, 86% of those surveyed still felt that the needs of autistic people and their families were not adequately planned for or addressed by officials during the pandemic.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 02.07.2020
Examines Recursive Thinking
CMU team finds links between humans and non-human primates Recursion - the computational capacity to embed elements within elements of the same kind - has been lauded as the intellectual cornerstone of language, tool use and mathematics. A multi-institutional team of Carnegie Mellon University researchers, for the first time, show this ability is shared across age, species and cultural groups in a new study published in the June 26 issue of the journal Science Advances.

Social Sciences - 01.07.2020
Infant sleep problems can signal mental disorders in adolescents - study
Specific sleep problems among babies and very young children can be linked to mental disorders in adolescents, a new study has found. A team at the University of Birmingham's School of Psychology studied questionnaire data from the Children of the 90s , a UK-based longitudinal study which recruited pregnant mothers of 14,000 babies when it was set up almost three decades ago.

Social Sciences - Health - 01.07.2020
Researchers to investigate social contact and physical distancing behaviours during COVID-19
Understanding these contact patterns, and how people physically distance from each other in different settings and among different groups, will help policy makers design effective control strategies for preventing transmission. The CON-QUEST (COroNavirus QUESTionnaire) study, funded by the Elizabeth Blackwell Institute and supported by the NIHR Health Protection Research Unit in Behavioural Science and Evaluation , will initially focus on contacts between University staff and students to understand how coronavirus spreads in a university setting.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 30.06.2020
From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
From age 8 we spontaneously link vocal to facial emotion
Scientists have tracked the eye movements of children to show how they make the link - spontaneously and without instructions - between vocal emotion (happiness or anger) followed by a natural or virtual face. Do children have to wait until age 8 to recognise - spontaneously and without instructions - the same emotion of happiness or anger depending on whether it is expressed by a voice or on a face? A team of scientists from the University of Geneva and the Swiss Centre for Affective Sciences (CISA) has provided an initial response to this question.

Health - Social Sciences - 30.06.2020
More than 40% of COVID-19 infections had no symptoms
A study of COVID-19 in the quarantined Italian town of V, where most of the population was tested, reveals the importance of asymptomatic cases. The authors of the new research suggest asymptomatic or pre-symptomatic people are an important factor in the transmission of COVID-19. They also argue that widespread testing, isolating infected people, and a community lockdown effectively stopped the outbreak in its tracks.

Social Sciences - 30.06.2020
Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves
Bugs resort to several colours to protect themselves
New research has revealed for the first time that shield bugs use a variety of colours throughout their lives to avoid predators. Shield bugs are often bright, colourful insects that use colours to warn of their distastefulness to predators.

Social Sciences - 29.06.2020
Number of Australians facing housing stress doubles
The number of Australians who couldn't pay their rent or mortgage on time has more than doubled due to COVID-19, new data from The Australian National University (ANU) shows. The survey of more than 3,200 people shows the proportion of Australians not being able to meet their regular housing costs jumped from 6.9 per cent in April to 15.1 per cent in May.

Social Sciences - 29.06.2020
Number of Australians facing housig stress doubles
The number of Australians who couldn't pay their rent or mortgage on time has more than doubled due to COVID-19, new data from The Australian National University (ANU) shows. The survey of more than 3,200 people shows the proportion of Australians not being able to meet their regular housing costs jumped from 6.9 per cent in April to 15.1 per cent in May.

Social Sciences - 26.06.2020
Native Amazonians, Americans and monkeys show similar thinking patterns
Scientists tested Bolivia's indigenous Tsimane' people (bottom left), U.S. adults and children and macaque monkeys on their thinking patterns when arranging sequences. (Photo courtesy of Stephen Ferrigno) Humans and monkeys may not speak the same lingo, but our ways of thinking are a lot more similar than previously thought, according to new research from UC Berkeley, Harvard University and Carnegie Mellon University.

Health - Social Sciences - 26.06.2020
Third of people report enjoying lockdown
On balance a third of people in the UK have been enjoying the lockdown, while 46% have not been enjoying it and 21% have mixed feelings, finds UCL's Covid-19 Social Study. The research also shows that 17% of people have not been enjoying lockdown 'at all', whilst only 4% of people have been enjoying it 'very much'.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 25.06.2020
Dolphins Learn in Similar Ways to Great Apes
Dolphins Learn in Similar Ways to Great Apes
Dolphins learn new foraging techniques not just from their mothers, but also from their peers, a study by the University of Zurich has found. More than 1,000 bottlenose dolphins in Shark Bay, Western Australia were observed over 10 years and found to have cultural behavior that is similar to great apes.

Social Sciences - Economics / Business - 25.06.2020
'Poverty alleviation' and 'needy'' Why words can do more harm than good when offering help
’Poverty alleviation’ and ’needy’’ Why words can do more harm than good when offering help
Stanford psychologists suggest that aid programs can be more effective with messaging that conveys dignity and empowerment in culturally relevant ways and does not jeopardize donations. Non-profits often pull at donors' heartstrings by casting aid recipients as "poor," "needy" or "vulnerable." But new Stanford research shows how such demeaning language can undermine their goal to help others.

Environment - Social Sciences - 25.06.2020
Environmental activists: at high risk of violence and assassination
Activists protesting against environmental injustices around the world suffer from high rates of criminalization, physical violence and murder, according to a study published this week in Global Environmental Change . Indeed, despite the fact that they primarily use nonviolent forms of protest, activists are victims of violence in 18% of environmental conflicts, and of murder in 13% of these conflicts.

Computer Science - Social Sciences - 25.06.2020
Smart phones are empowering women worldwide
By giving women access to information they otherwise wouldn't have, mobile phones are transforming lives. Putting smart phones in women's hands could be a powerful tool to support sustainable development goals in the developing world, according to researchers from McGill University, University of Oxford and Bocconi University.

Psychology - Social Sciences - 24.06.2020
Psychological research has a racism problem, Stanford scholar says
Psychological research has a racism problem, Stanford scholar says
Across five decades of psychological research, publications that highlight race are rare, and when race is discussed, it is authored mostly and edited almost entirely by white scholars, according to a new Stanford study. Race plays a critical role in shaping how people experience the world around them, so one would expect a rich body of literature published in mainstream psychological journals to examine its effects on people's thoughts, feelings and behavior.

Social Sciences - Health - 24.06.2020
In global report, U of M researchers find institutional care negatively impacts children’s development
Millions of separated children worldwide who live in institutions like orphanages or residential homes should be transitioned to family-based care environments, according to a new global report co-authored by an international group of authors that included three University of Minnesota researchers. Researchers found family-based care environments - such as kinship networks, foster care, adoption or kafalah - provide the care, socialization, and protection are required for a child's healthy development.

Social Sciences - Health - 23.06.2020
Covid-19: Most disadvantaged 9 times more likely to struggle paying the bills
Adults in the lowest socio-economic group have been almost nine times more likely to struggle to pay the bills compared to those from higher socio-economic groups, finds a new UCL study examining adversity relating to Covid-19. The study, published with Epidemiology and Community Health , explored the changing patterns of adversity in the UK relating to the Covid-19 pandemic by socioeconomic position during the early weeks of lockdown from 25 March to 14 April 2020.

Health - Social Sciences - 22.06.2020
Prisoners experience inequality of healthcare in hospitals
Fear, stigma, reduced autonomy and security requirements have resulted in prisoners receiving lower standards of secondary healthcare than the wider community, finds a new UCL-led study. Published today in The Lancet EClinicalMedicine, the study explores accounts of around 40 prisoners, and is the first to consider how people in prisons experience hospital healthcare.
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