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Art and Design - Social Sciences
15.02.2018
Play it again: People find comfort listening to the same songs over and over
ANN ARBOR-With the frequency that some people play their favorite song, it's a good thing vinyl records aren't used often because they might wear out. University of Michigan researchers have found that people enjoy replaying a favorite song many times even after the novelty and surprise are gone. In a new study, participants reported listening to their favorite song hundreds of times.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
07.02.2018
The connection between a healthy marriage and a healthy heart
For many, marriage signals the beginning of an entwined and, at times, tangled relationship. Spouses often play the role of friend, co-parent, caregiver, financial partner and emotional support system for their significant other.
Social Sciences
06.02.2018
LISTEN: Unknown language discovered in Southeast Asia
LISTEN: Unknown language discovered in Southeast Asia
A previously unknown language has been found in the Malay Peninsula by linguists from Lund University in Sweden. The language has been given the name Jedek. "Documentation of endangered minority languages such as Jedek is important, as it provides new insights into human cognition and culture", says Joanne Yager, doctoral student at Lund University.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
05.02.2018
Social isolation health message fails to cut through
Social isolation health message fails to cut through
Social isolation has been shown to pose a greater health threat than smoking, poor diet and lack of exercise - but that message is failing to get through to the community. However, a new study led by University of Queensland School of Psychology researcher Professor Alex Haslam shows that people remain largely unaware of the importance of social connectedness for health.
Social Sciences
30.01.2018
Safeguarding children when sentencing mothers
Oxford University have collaborated with the Prison Reform Trust to create new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment. Image credit: Shutterstock Oxford University has collaborated with the Prison Reform Trust to create new resources, including films and briefings, to help criminal justice professionals improve their understanding of the impacts of maternal imprisonment.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
30.01.2018
Dating Partners More Violent and Account for More Domestic Violence Than Spouses
Tuesday, January 30, 2018 Federal regulations designed to keep guns away from abusive partners, like the Violence Against Women Act, do not currently apply to dating relationships. But new research from the University of Pennsylvania published in the journal Preventive Medicine reveals that they likely should.
Politics - Social Sciences
29.01.2018
Sociologist’s research on Filipino leader reveals insights into populist politics
By many accounts, Joseph Estrada had a lackluster record of helping the poor in the Philippines. The former president was ousted in 2001 and later convicted of plunder for stealing $80 million from the government. Nevertheless, the urban poor in Manila have continued to support the former film actor, who ran for president in 2010 after being pardoned.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
25.01.2018
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London involving UCL.  The study, analysed questionnaire and interview data from the Determinants of young Adult Social well-being and Health (DASH) study, the UK's largest longitudinal study of ethnically diverse young people.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
24.01.2018
Racism linked to uptake of smoking in young people
Adolescents who have experienced some form of racism between the ages of 11 and 23 are more likely to take up smoking than those who have not, according to a new study led by King's College London. Published in PLOS ONE , the study analysed questionnaire and interview data from the Determinants of young Adult Social well-being and Health (DASH) study, one of the UK's largest longitudinal studies of ethnically diverse young people.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.01.2018
Flawed research methods exaggerate the prevalence of depression
A new study concludes that researchers commonly over-estimate the prevalence of depression by using self-report screening tools not meant to diagnose depression An over-reliance on self-report screening questionnaires, wherein patients essentially define their own condition, in place of diagnostic interviews conducted by a health care professional, has resulted in over-estimation of the prevalence of people with depression in many research studies - often by a factor of two to three times.
Social Sciences - Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering
17.01.2018
Location plays critical role in assimilation of U.S. immigrants
Research from the University of Chicago finds immigrant populations within the United States assimilate in different ways, with demographics and geography playing critical roles, according to a study by Angela S. García, a sociologist and assistant professor at the University of Chicago School of Social Service Administration.
Social Sciences
17.01.2018
Low-income immigrants face barriers to U.S. citizenship
New research shows that lowering application fees for naturalization could help more U.S. immigrants gain the benefits of citizenship. Immigrants who want to become U.S. citizens face barriers from the high cost of the naturalization application, according to a new Stanford study.  The work suggests that lowering the federal application fees, or creating local programs to provide financial assistance to cover them, could help more people gain the benefits of citizenship, including the right to vote and participate in democracy.
Social Sciences - Life Sciences
16.01.2018
Can being too social take years off your life?
Can being too social take years off your life?
Large ground squirrels called yellow-bellied marmots live much longer, on average, if they are less social and more isolated than if they are more social and less isolated, a UCLA-led long-term study has found. A team of biologists studied 66 adult female marmots from 2002 to 2015 at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in western Colorado.
Life Sciences - Social Sciences
12.01.2018
Friends’ genes may help friends stay in school
While there's scientific evidence to suggest that your genes have something to do with how far you'll go in school, new research by a team from Stanford and elsewhere says the DNA of your classmates also plays a role. "We examined whether the genes of your peer groups influenced your height, weight or educational attainment.
Social Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
10.01.2018
Suicides by drugs in U.S. are undercounted, new study suggests
The rate of suicides by drug intoxication in the United States may be vastly underreported and misclassified, according to a new study co-written by Mark Kaplan , professor of social welfare at the UCLA Luskin School of Public Affairs. The study was published online Jan. 10 in the journal PLOS ONE. The researchers report that the drug suicide rate in the United States rose nearly one-quarter (24 percent) between 2000 and 2016, and the accidental opioid and other drug intoxication death rate increased by 312 percent.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
09.01.2018
Heart health at risk for Latinas worried about deportation
A recent study conducted by researchers at UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley's Center for Environmental Research and Children's Health ( CERCH ) found that worry about deportation was associated with multiple cardiovascular health risk factors in Latinas from California's Salinas Valley, home to many immigrants.
Social Sciences - Administration/Government
09.01.2018
Calls for Government to limit 'collateral damage' caused to families by immigration enforcement
Calls for Government to limit ’collateral damage’ caused to families by immigration enforcement
Political pledges to reduce immigration are splitting up families, according to new research which urges the Government to revise its policies in order to reduce 'collateral damage' inflicted on partners and children. In the first study of its kind, funded by the Economic and Social Research Council (ESRC), researchers at the University of Bristol explored how a precarious immigration status impacts on family life.
Social Sciences
08.01.2018
Researchers call for true picture of domestic violent crime
Researchers call for true picture of domestic violent crime
Violence against women could become significantly less visible in police-recorded crime figures when a new counting method comes into effect, warn researchers at Lancaster University. Plans for Home Office Counting Rules to count coercive and controlling behaviour as ‘non-injurious violent crime' capped at one crime per victim - even though statistics show one in 20 victims can experience more than 10 domestic violence crimes a year - will mask the true extent of the problem.
Social Sciences
03.01.2018
Study investigates impact of lions living alongside giraffe populations
Study investigates impact of lions living alongside giraffe populations
New research from the University of Bristol is calling for an urgent review into how populations of giraffes are managed in the wild when living alongside lions. It is commonly accepted that lions are the only predators to pose a risk to giraffes on an individual basis but there has never been a study to investigate how the presence of lions impacts on the population as a whole.
Innovation/Technology - Social Sciences
21.12.2017
Technology not taking over children’s lives despite screen-time increase
New Oxford University research has revealed that as digital past-times have become intertwined with daily life, children have adapted their behaviours to include their devices. Much like adults, they are able to multi-task and do all the things that they would do anyway, such as, homework and playing outdoors with friends.
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