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Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
Deaf infants more attuned to parent's visual cues
Deaf infants more attuned to parent’s visual cues
Eye gaze helps infants communicate. Through everyday interactions, eye gaze establishes a social connection between parent and child and is linked to early word learning. But can learning experiences before a baby's first birthday prompt babies to pay more attention to their parent's eye gaze? To test this, a research team led by the University of Washington's Institute for Learning & Brain Sciences (I-LABS) sought out Deaf infants raised by Deaf parents - families who primarily use visual language and visual cues.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
Lowest-paid workers have longest retirements
The lowest-paid workers in the UK have three more years of retirement on average compared to their professional counterparts, but are more likely to suffer ill health after stopping work, a new UCL-led study suggests. The study, published today in The Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health , examined the length of time between stopping work and dying among people in England and Wales born before 1951.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
New links between food access and risk of malnutrition for older people
New research has highlighted that food insecurity - a measure of the availability of food and individuals' ability to access it - is putting older people in Scotland at risk of becoming underweight and malnourished. The ongoing study from the University of Glasgow and the Scottish charity Food Train is focused on the current issues facing older adults and food access.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
High numbers of young people experimenting with gambling
Two fifths (41%) of young people aged 11 to 16 report having engaged in gambling in the past year, a study shows. The analysis from Cardiff University academics, the largest of its kind in the UK, reveals fruit machines at an arcade, pub or club were the most popular form of gambling, followed by playing cards for money with friends and purchasing scratch cards.

Social Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 15.10.2019
Increase in online hate speech leads to more crimes against minorities
An increase in hate speech on social media leads to more crimes against minorities in the physical world, a study shows. Academics from Cardiff University's HateLab project collected Twitter and police recorded crime data from London over an eight-month period to analyse whether a significant association existed.

Social Sciences - 15.10.2019
CMU, AAU Report Findings from Sexual Assault, Misconduct Survey
Results from the Association of American Universities' (AAU) Campus Climate Survey on Sexual Assault and Misconduct, a study of 33 universities including Carnegie Mellon University, have been published on CMU's Office of Title IX Initiatives' website. The results include the aggregate report of all participating institutions, a CMU specific report, and a comparison summary compiled by CMU's Office of Institutional Research and Analysis.

Social Sciences - 14.10.2019
Integration of refugees: Germans in east and west show similar willingness to help
Integration of refugees: Germans in east and west show similar willingness to help
In discussions in Germany on immigrants, particularly eastern Germany is often associated with attacks on foreigners and hate crimes against refugees. Research data and surveys also indicate that prejudices against immigrants are often stronger in the east of the country than in the western half. But are these differences also reflected in small acts of everyday help? This question was looked at in detail by researchers at the University of Münster, the University of Bielefeld and the University of Applied Sciences for Public Administration and management of North Rhine-Westphalia.

Social Sciences - Psychology - 14.10.2019
Opinion: Mental health is a care we must share
Professor Peter Fonagy, Head of UCL Psychology & Language Sciences, writes about how wide social networks can help to shield people from mental disorder, arguing that we should celebrate this collective responsibility. The government published its first national review of children and young people's mental wellbeing on 10 October, World Mental Health Day.

Social Sciences - Life Sciences - 14.10.2019
Fishing for the triple bottom line: profit, planet - and people
Fisheries managers typically strive to strike a delicate balance between two, often competing, types of needs: the needs for fishermen's profits and the needs for the planet. But in 1994, entrepreneur John Elkington posited that true sustainability requires consideration of a third "P" - the needs of the people.

Social Sciences - 14.10.2019
How Does Interracial Contact in Childhood Impact Adult Interracial Relationships?
Findings by Researchers at the University of Antwerp, the Paris School of Economics, and Freie Universität Berlin No 299/2019 from Oct 14, 2019 According to a recent study, interracial contact in childhood leads to more diverse social relationships in adulthood. In particular, racial composition in schools impacts romantic relationships later in life.

Social Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.10.2019
Wastewater reveals socioeconomic link to diet and drug consumption
Wastewater reveals socioeconomic link to diet and drug consumption
The consumption of caffeine, citrus, vitamin B and dietary fibre is higher in communities with higher socioeconomic status, according to new research from The University of Queensland. A study led by Queensland Alliance for Environmental Health Sciences (QAEHS) researchers uses wastewater to show the correlation between socioeconomics and diet and drug consumption.

Social Sciences - Law - 10.10.2019
Update ‘nearest relative’ criteria under Mental Health Act to increase patient choice
The system in place under the Mental Health Act that places decision-making powers in the hands of the nearest relatives for people who are sectioned needs to be extended to others to improve patient choice, according to new research. The study, from academics at the universities of Bath, Bristol and the University of the West of England published in the journal Health & Social Care in the Community , identifies challenges to the existing system and makes recommendations for policy-makers and practitioners.

Social Sciences - 09.10.2019
Irony and humour keep teenage #gymlads healthy on social media
Teenage boys rely on social media to access a wealth of information about living a healthy lifestyle - but rather than being victims of online harms, such as an unhealthy body image obsession, the majority are able to use humour, irony and banter to navigate social media content. In a new study, published in Qualitative Research in Sport, Exercise and Health, researchers in the University of Birmingham's School of Sport, Exercise and Rehabilitation Sciences , investigated how young boys use Instagram, Snapchat and YouTube to learn about physical activity, diet, and body image.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 08.10.2019
Modern Family Roles Improve Life Satisfaction for Parents
Increased equality has a positive effect on mothers and fathers. Thanks to greater freedom to strike an individual balance between caring for children and working in paid employment, mothers and fathers today are happier with their lives than parents were 20 or 30 years ago, a study by sociologists at the University of Zurich has shown.

Health - Social Sciences - 07.10.2019
UNAIDS HIV targets will be missed among gay men in Africa
UNAIDS HIV targets will be missed among gay men in Africa
Despite improvements in HIV testing among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Africa, many are missing out on HIV treatment. This is the finding of research, led by Imperial College London , which analysed data from 75 independent studies involving 44,993 MSM across 28 African countries, between 2004 and 2018.

Social Sciences - Health - 07.10.2019
Violence linked to loneliness, hypervigilance and chronic health problems
Exposure to violence can negatively impact a person's physical and psychosocial health, according to two new studies co-authored by University of Chicago scholars. The studies, co-authored by social epidemiologist  Elizabeth L. Tung , were based on in-person surveys of more than 500 adults living in Chicago neighborhoods with high rates of violent crime, and in predominantly racial and ethnic minority groups.

Social Sciences - Health - 04.10.2019
Health disparities, strong social support among state's LGBTQ community
Health disparities, strong social support among state’s LGBTQ community
LGBTQ individuals in Washington state have higher rates of disability and poorer mental health than their heterosexual counterparts, according to a study released Oct. 4 by the University of Washington. The results of the Washington State Equity and Diversity Project show specific disparities in the health of LGBTQ adults aged 18 and older.

Social Sciences - 04.10.2019
People eat more when dining with friends and family - study
People eat more with friends and family than when dining alone - a possible throwback to our early ancestors' approach to survival, according to a new study. This phenomenon is known as ‘social facilitation'. Previous studies found that those eating with others ate up to 48% more food than solo diners and women with obesity eating socially consumed up to 29% more than when eating alone.

Social Sciences - 03.10.2019
"Children’s voices" omitted from care records, UCL study finds
The social care records of looked-after children and young people need to include those children's voices, according to a collaborative research project led by UCL with the Care Leaver's Association and the charity Family Action. The MIRRA (Memory - Identity - Rights in Records - Access) project, led by Professor Elizabeth Shepherd (UCL Information Studies), collected interview and focus group data from more than 80 care leavers, social work practitioners and information professionals.

Career - Social Sciences - 26.09.2019
Pay, flexibility, advancement: They all matter for workers' health and safety
Pay, flexibility, advancement: They all matter for workers’ health and safety
The terms and conditions of your employment - including your pay, hours, schedule flexibility and job security - influence your overall health as well as your risk of being injured on the job, according to new research from the University of Washington. The analysis takes a comprehensive approach to show that the overall pattern of employment conditions is important for health, beyond any single measure of employment, such as wages or contract type.
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