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Life Sciences - 04.07.2022
Major funding award to enhance breeding of laying hens
Major funding award to enhance breeding of laying hens
Open Philanthropy, a foundation based in California, USA, will support animal welfare scientist Michael J Toscano of the University of Bern and industrial collaborators.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2022
UK organisations release annual statistics for use of animals in research
The ten organisations in Great Britain that carry out the highest number of animal procedures - those used in medical, veterinary and scientific research - have today released their annual statistics.

Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2022
Körber European Science Prize 2022 for Anthony Hyman
Körber European Science Prize 2022 for Anthony Hyman
The director at the Max Planck Institute of Molecular Cell Biology and Genetics in Dresden receives the award for the discovery of condensates - cell droplets without a membrane In 2009, Hyman and hi

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 30.06.2022
Bacteria for Blastoff: Using Microbes to Make Supercharged New Rocket Fuel
Bacteria for Blastoff: Using Microbes to Make Supercharged New Rocket Fuel
Scientists have developed a new class of energy-dense biofuels based on one of nature's most unique molecules C onverting petroleum into fuels involves crude chemistry first invented by humans in the 1800s. Meanwhile, bacteria have been producing carbon-based energy molecules for billions of years. Which do you think is better at the job?

Materials Science - Life Sciences - 30.06.2022
Making better use of sugar beet - thanks to Empa know-how
More than 250 million metric tons of sugar beet were harvested worldwide in 2020 and processed into table sugar.

Life Sciences - Health - 29.06.2022
Organoids Reveal Similarities Between Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1 and Rett Syndrome
Discoveries of common mutations and dysfunction also point to therapeutic possibilities for both inherited disorders Myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) is the most common form of muscular dystrophy, characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness and caused by abnormally repetitive DNA segments that are transcribed into toxic molecules of RNA.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 29.06.2022
Watching how cells deal with stress
Watching how cells deal with stress
FMI researchers developed an imaging approach that allowed them to visualize individual molecules involved in the cell's response to stress. When a cell is exposed to stressors such as toxins, it switches on pathways aimed at repairing damage. One of these pathways is called the 'unfolded protein response', which senses unfolded or misfolded proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum — a cell organelle designated for folding proteins destined to other organelles or to be secreted by the cell.

Environment - Life Sciences - 29.06.2022

Life Sciences - Innovation - 29.06.2022
Startup brings RNA sequencing into the age of big data
Startup brings RNA sequencing into the age of big data
EPFL spin-off Alithea Genomics has developed a system that allows scientists to easily tag bulk RNA samples with molecular barcodes so they can be processed by the hundreds in one single tube. The technology promises to dramatically shorten and streamline sample preparation for RNA sequencing, which will enable new applications for this technology, such as biomarker discovery and drug development.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2022
Trigger that sets off metastasis in pancreatic cancer
Scientists have found that cancers in the pancreas (left) readily metastasize because these tumors suppress levels of an enzyme, MSRA, that pulls oxygen atoms off amino acids called methionine. As MSRA levels decrease, methionines on proteins become more oxidized. This causes one particular protein to rev up energy production in the tumor, promoting the migration of cancer cells to other organs.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 29.06.2022
A biology lab in the palm of your hands
A biology lab in the palm of your hands
A student-created app brings the biology lab experience to users' smartphones, paving the way for a more accessible lab education Johns Hopkins University undergraduate students who missed in-person

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
7.4 million euros for research into products from wastewater
Showering, cleaning, flushing toilets, and industrial production are all processes that use a great deal of water.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2022

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.06.2022

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2022

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.06.2022
Can CRISPR help us deal with climate change?
Evan Groover, a UC Berkeley graduate student in the Innovative Genomics Institute labs of David Savage and Brian Staskawicz, examines a rice plant that has been edited using CRISPR techniques.

Life Sciences - Environment - 24.06.2022
Proteins from microbial fermentation get boost with The ProteInn Club
Proteins from microbial fermentation get boost with The ProteInn Club
The new innovation platform 'The ProteInn Club (Ghent University, CAPTURE, ILVO and the Bio Base Europe Pilot Plant (BBEPP) focuses on proteins made via fermentation-based production processes.

Environment - Life Sciences - 23.06.2022
In colorful avian world, hummingbirds rule
In colorful avian world, hummingbirds rule
Yale ornithologist Richard Prum has spent years studying the molecules and nanostructures that give many bird species their rich colorful plumage, but nothing prepared him for what he found in hummingbirds. The range of colors in the plumage of hummingbirds exceeds the color diversity of all other bird species in total, Prum and a team of researchers report June 23 in the journal Communications Biology.

Health - Life Sciences - 22.06.2022
Austrian Academy of Sciences scholarships for MedUni Vienna researchers
The Austrian Academy of Sciences (Ă–AW) has accepted more young researchers onto its scholarship programmes.

Research Management - Life Sciences - 20.06.2022

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.06.2022
The power of chance
The power of chance
Life is constantly evolving, and yet "progress" is not the right word for this process of organismal change, says evolutionary geneticist Jochen Wolf. A chasm of more than three-and-a-half billion years separates the beginnings of life from today's abundant biological diversity. Virtually all environments on Earth - even the supposedly most inhospitable ones such as Antarctica or the ocean depths - are inhabited by living organisms.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 16.06.2022
Light show in the lab: Taking a look at biochemist Seraphine Wegner's work
Light show in the lab: Taking a look at biochemist Seraphine Wegner’s work
Looking at the websites of Prof Seraphine Wegner, who is a researcher at the Institute of Physiological Chemistry and Pathobiochemistry at Münster University's Faculty of Medicine, the reader comes across English terms such as -photoswitchable-, -spatiotemporal- and -tissue engineering-.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.06.2022

Health - Life Sciences - 14.06.2022
A dynamic duo of cells identified in lung blood vessels
A dynamic duo of cells identified in lung blood vessels
Scientists at the University of Illinois Chicago have analyzed gene expression data from more than 35,000 blood vessel cells from the lungs of mice and identified two subtypes.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.06.2022
Award for research on Rett syndrome
Award for research on Rett syndrome
Huda Zoghbi and Adrian Bird receive the International Prize for Translational Neuroscience 2022 of the Gertrud Reemtsma Foundation for their findings on the causes of Rett syndrome The brain is one of nature's most complex structures.

Health - Life Sciences - 13.06.2022

Life Sciences - Health - 13.06.2022
Spotlight on FMIers: Iskra Katic
At first glance, Caenorhabditis elegans , or C. elegans for short, isn't exactly awe-inspiring.

Life Sciences - 13.06.2022
’Monkey media player’ suggests zoo animals may prefer to listen
A 'monkey media player' which lets zoo animals choose between video and sound files suggests they may prefer to spend more of their time listening than watching. The player is the latest development in ongoing zoo enrichment research from animal-computer interaction specialists at the University of Glasgow in the UK and Aalto University in Finland.

Health - Life Sciences - 10.06.2022
GRDC's support plants the seed for crop disease breakthroughs
GRDC’s support plants the seed for crop disease breakthroughs
A Curtin University research centre will continue to discover new ways to reduce the economic impact of crop disease for Australian growers, with a further five-year investment of $30 million by the Grains Research and Development Corporation (GRDC).

Life Sciences - 09.06.2022
Dating for researchers at the Bundeskunsthalle
Dating for researchers at the Bundeskunsthalle
Life and health matter(s): At an exceptional networking event, members of the Transdisciplinary Research Areas "Building Blocks of Matter and Fundamental Interactions" (Matter) and "Life and Health" at the University of Bonn got to know each other and exchanged ideas.

History / Archeology - Life Sciences - 09.06.2022
The origin of human societies to be analysed in Mčtode magazine
New issue: -Vida social: Una historia natural de las sociedades- (-Social Life: a natural history of societies-) What is the role of cooperation in our evolution?

Life Sciences - Environment - 09.06.2022
Scientists seek to grow the field of eDNA research 'without squelching creativity'
Scientists seek to grow the field of eDNA research ’without squelching creativity’
A new effort at the University of Washington aims to accelerate eDNA research by supporting existing projects and building a network of practitioners to advance the nascent field. Called the eDNA Collaborative , the team is based in the College of the Environment with leadership and program staff from the School of Marine and Environmental Affairs.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 08.06.2022
Researchers to study whether metal-corroding microbes can grow in Canada’s proposed nuclear waste facility
With Canada getting closer to moving all its spent nuclear fuel to a single facility, and encasing each fuel container in bentonite clay, researchers are studying whether that clay could support microbial life - which could eat away at the metal containers.

Psychology - Life Sciences - 07.06.2022
Activating an Amygdala-Brainstem Pathway Relieves Pain and Improves Emotional State in Rats
Activating a circuit between the amygdala and brainstem relieves pain and reduces defensive behaviors in rats, according to a study recently published in the Journal of Neuroscience by a study team at MedUni Vienna's Center for Brain Research.

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.06.2022
UBC experts on World Oceans Day
UBC experts on World Oceans Day
UBC experts are available to comment on various topics on June 8, World Oceans Day.

Life Sciences - 06.06.2022
Scientists urge WTO to ban subsidies that promote overfishing
Scientists urge WTO to ban subsidies that promote overfishing
Q&As Alex Walls Scientists are calling on the World Trade Organization (WTO) to ban subsidies that can cause overfishing at its meeting next week.

Health - Life Sciences - 03.06.2022
The unsuspected virtues of hot pepper
The unsuspected virtues of hot pepper
Hot pepper is hot. But it's also packed with potential therapeutic qualities. Capsaicin is the molecule that has it all! UdeM experts explain. It adds punch, heat, personality. It injects flavour, colour, aroma. It goes by many names-habanero, cayenne, jalapeńo, poblano, bird's eye-but hot pepper by any name always gets a reaction.

Environment - Life Sciences - 03.06.2022

Health - Life Sciences - 03.06.2022
App detecting jaundice in babies a success in first major clinical trial
App detecting jaundice in babies a success in first major clinical trial
A smartphone app that identifies severe jaundice in newborn babies by scanning their eyes could be a life-saver in areas that lack access to expensive screening devices, suggests a study co-authored by researchers at UCL (University College London) and the University of Ghana. The app, called neoSCB, was developed by clinicians and engineers at UCL and was used to screen for jaundice in over 300 newborn babies in Ghana, following an initial pilot study on 37 newborns at University College London Hospital (UCLH) in 2020.

Environment - Life Sciences - 02.06.2022
How tree extinction affects the food web
How tree extinction affects the food web
German Research Foundation approves international research group headed by biologist Alexandra-Maria Klein The German Research Foundation (DFG) has approved the Research Group 5281 "Multitrophic Inte
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