news

« BACK

Electroengineering



Results 1 - 20 of 647.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 33 Next »


Electroengineering - Innovation - 26.01.2023
3D-printed radio antennas could bring 5G and 6G to remote communities
University of Sheffield researchers have developed 3D-printed radio antennas that could be used to bring the fastest mobile phone networks to people living in remote areas for the first time 3D-printed millimetre wave aerials are much quicker and cheaper to produce than those currently used by the telecommunications industry, but have the same level of performance Development could help to drive innovation, speed up the production of new prototy

Physics - Electroengineering - 10.01.2023
Milestone for light-driven electronics
Milestone for light-driven electronics
Within the framework of the Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat, excitons were generated in a topological insulator for the first time. A breakthrough in quantum research, based on material design from Würzburg. An international team of scientists collaborating within the Würzburg-Dresden Cluster of Excellence ct.qmat has achieved a breakthrough in quantum research - the first detection of excitons (electrically neutral quasiparticles) in a topological insulator.

Physics - Electroengineering - 26.12.2022
Optomechanics simulates graphene lattices
Optomechanics simulates graphene lattices
Scientists at EPFL have overcome the scaling challenges of quantum optomechanical systems and realized the first superconducting circuit optomechanical graphene lattice. The precise control of micro-mechanical oscillators is fundamental to many contemporary technologies, from sensing and timing to radiofrequency filters in smartphones.

Physics - Electroengineering - 06.12.2022
Long-range information transport in antiferromagnets
Long-range information transport in antiferromagnets
Antiferromagnets are suitable for transporting spin waves over long distances Smaller, faster, more powerful: The demands on microelectronic devices are high and are constantly increasing. However, if chips, processors and the like are based on electricity, there are limits to miniaturization. Physicists are therefore working on alternative ways of transporting information, such as about spin waves, also called magnons, for example.

Physics - Electroengineering - 23.11.2022
Spin correlation between paired electrons demonstrated
Spin correlation between paired electrons demonstrated
Physicists at the University of Basel have experimentally demonstrated for the first time that there is a negative correlation between the two spins of an entangled pair of electrons from a superconductor. For their study, the researchers used spin filters made of nanomagnets and quantum dots, as they report in the scientific journal Nature.

Physics - Electroengineering - 21.11.2022
A twin pack of cooled nanoparticles
A twin pack of cooled nanoparticles
Researchers at ETH have developed a technique to cool several nanoparticles simultaneously to temperatures of just a few thousandths of a degree above absolute zero. This new method can be used to study quantum effects of several nanoparticles and to build highly sensitive sensors. Over the past forty years, physicists have learned to cool increasingly large objects down to temperatures close to the absolute zero: atoms, molecules and, more recently, also nanoparticles consisting of billions of atoms.

Electroengineering - Innovation - 09.11.2022
AI helps optimise power electronic converters
A new and more efficient way of modelling and designing power electronic converters using artificial intelligence (AI) has been created by a team of experts from Cardiff University and the Compound Semiconductor Applications (CSA) Catapult. The method has reduced design times for technology by up to 78% compared to traditional approaches and was used to create a device with an efficiency of over 98%.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 03.11.2022
New material will make locally flexible diodes possible
New material will make locally flexible diodes possible
Researchers find new material with significant potential for electronics applications Diodes allow directed flows of current. Without them, modern electronics would be inconceivable. Until now, they had to be made out of two materials with different characteristics. A research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) has now discovered a material that makes it possible to create a diode with a simple change in temperature.

Materials Science - Electroengineering - 27.10.2022
'Grätzel' solar cells achieve a new record
’Grätzel’ solar cells achieve a new record
Scientists at EPFL have increased the power conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells ("Grätzel cells") beyond 15% in direct sunlight and 30% in ambient light conditions. Mesoscopic dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) were invented in 1990s by Brian O'Regan and Michael Grätzel, taking on the latter's name - the world-famous Grätzel cells.

Physics - Electroengineering - 20.10.2022
Confining classical and quantum waves with crystals
Manipulating elusive waves like light, sound or electrons, in periodic structures or crystals, has something mysterious. In the leading physics journal Physical Review Letters, published by the American Physical Society, a team of researchers from the University of Twente now describes how any kind of wave, whether quantum or classical, is confined in any kind of crystal.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.09.2022
Ultracold circuits
Ultracold circuits
Cooling materials to extremely low temperatures is important for basic physics research as well as for technological applications. By improving a special refrigerator and a low-temperature thermometer, Basel scientists have now managed to cool an electric circuit on a chip down to 220 microkelvin - close to absolute zero.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.09.2022
Cell Rover: Exploring and augmenting the inner world of the cell
MIT researchers demonstrate an intracellular antenna that's compatible with 3D biological systems and can operate wirelessly inside a living cell. Researchers at the MIT Media Lab have designed a miniature antenna that can operate wirelessly inside of a living cell, opening up possibilities in medical diagnostics and treatment and other scientific processes because of the antenna's potential for monitoring and even directing cellular activity in real-time.

Physics - Electroengineering - 14.09.2022
Interplay of electronics and photonics for next generation quantum devices
Interplay of electronics and photonics for next generation quantum devices
For building quantum computers, making use of both electronics and photonics - technology that works with light - on one and the same chip, is promising. Thanks to silicon technology that we know well from today's electronic devices, quantum devices could be better protected from influences from the outside world.

Electroengineering - Materials Science - 30.08.2022
Green electronics made from wood
Green electronics made from wood
Sustainable electronic components can be made from wood with the help of a novel process that uses a laser to engrave electrically conductive structures on veneers. A research team at Empa and at ETH's Institute for Building Materials has developed a practical and versatile method for making wooden surfaces electrically conductive.

Electroengineering - Environment - 29.08.2022
Print, Recycle, Repeat: Scientists Demonstrate a Biodegradable Printed Circuit
Print, Recycle, Repeat: Scientists Demonstrate a Biodegradable Printed Circuit
Breakthrough could divert wearable devices and other flexible electronics from landfill According to the United Nations, less than a quarter of all U.S. electronic waste gets recycled. In 2021 alone, global e-waste surged at 57.4 million tons , and only 17.4% of that was recycled.

Physics - Electroengineering - 18.08.2022
Magnets in flux
Magnets in flux
Researchers at the Institute for Quantum Matter prove that mechanically manipulating a certain type of metal can change its magnetic properties, ushering in new applications for the rare and underutilized field of piezomagnetism A team of physicists at the Johns Hopkins Institute for Quantum Matter has discovered that they can control a metal's electromagnetic properties by manipulating it mechanically.

Electroengineering - 16.08.2022
Graphene as 'the philosopher's stone': turning waste into gold
Graphene as ’the philosopher’s stone’: turning waste into gold
Throughout history, alchemists believed in the existence of the philosopher's stone: a substance that could turn cheap substances into precious gold. Now scientists from The University of Manchester, Tsinghua University in China and the Chinese Academy of Sciences have shown that graphene can be a kind of philosopher's stone, allowing gold extraction from waste containing only trace amounts of gold (down to billionth of a percent).

Physics - Electroengineering - 11.08.2022
Unexpected quantum effects in natural double-layer graphene
Unexpected quantum effects in natural double-layer graphene
International research team led by Göttingen University controls interaction of charge carriers An international research team led by the University of Göttingen has detected novel quantum effects in high-precision studies of natural double-layer graphene and has interpreted them together with the University of Texas at Dallas using their theoretical work.

Electroengineering - Innovation - 13.07.2022
Future robots could ’see’ using new type of electronic skin
A new form of flexible photodetector could provide future robots with an electronic skin capable of 'seeing' light beyond the range of human vision. A team of engineers from the University of Glasgow are behind the breakthrough development, which involves a newly-developed method of printing microscale semiconductors made from gallium arsenide onto a flexible plastic surface.

Electroengineering - Physics - 22.06.2022
New Ultrathin Capacitor Could Enable Energy-Efficient Microchips
Scientists turn century-old material into a thin film for next-gen memory and logic devices Electron microscope images show the precise atom-by-atom structure of a barium titanate (BaTiO3) thin film sandwiched between layers of strontium ruthenate (SrRuO3) metal to make a tiny capacitor. (Credit: Lane Martin/Berkeley Lab) - By Rachel Berkowitz The silicon-based computer chips that power our modern devices require vast amounts of energy to operate.
1 2 3 4 5 ... 33 Next »