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Life Sciences - Health - 30.06.2022
Ten organisations account for half of all animal research in Great Britain in 2021
Ten organisations account for half of all animal research in Great Britain in 2021
Today, 30 June 2022, Understanding Animal Research (UAR) has published a list of the ten organisations that carry out the highest number of animal procedures - those used in medical, veterinary, and scientific research - in Great Britain. These statistics are freely available on the organisations' websites as part of their ongoing commitment to transparency and openness around the use of animals in research.

Health - 30.06.2022
The mere sight of a meal triggers an inflammatory response in the brain
The mere sight of a meal triggers an inflammatory response in the brain
Even before carbohydrates reach the bloodstream, the very sight and smell of a meal trigger the release of insulin. For the first time, researchers from the University of Basel and University Hospital Basel have shown that this insulin release depends on a short-term inflammatory response that takes place in these circumstances.

Health - 29.06.2022
Smoking promotes development of severe pulmonary hypertension
Smoking promotes development of severe pulmonary hypertension
Analysis of registry data leads MHH researchers to new insights into certain forms of the disease About one percent of the world's adult population suffers from pulmonary hypertension (PH). There are many forms of this disease. One of them is idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). This is a rare but very severe form of pulmonary hypertension.

Pharmacology - Health - 29.06.2022
Artificial intelligence techniques used to obtain antibiotic resistance patterns
The Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) is conducting research that analyses antibiotic resistance patterns with the aim of finding trends that can help decide which treatment to apply to each type of patient and stop the spread of bacteria. This study, recently published in the scientific journal Nature Communications, has been carried out together with the University of Exeter, the University of Birmingham (both in the United Kingdom) and the Westmead Hospital in Sydney (Australia).

Health - Psychology - 29.06.2022
New app helps Syrian refugees deal with post-traumatic stress
New app helps Syrian refugees deal with post-traumatic stress
Researchers at Leipzig University have partnered with Syrian refugees and an agency for e-mental health services to develop and scientifically test an app to help users deal with post-traumatic stress and related mental strain. The app - Sanadak - has now been published in Arabic and German and can be downloaded free of charge.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.06.2022
Later diagnosis of children with Wilms tumours in the UK leads to lower survival chances
Children in the UK and Republic of Ireland who are diagnosed with Wilms tumour - the most common children's kidney cancer - are less likely to survive without relapse than those in Germany and France due to later diagnosis, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The study, published in JCO Global Oncology , compared tumour size and stage of cancer at diagnosis with survival chances of 3,176 children with Wilms tumour.

Social Sciences - Health - 29.06.2022
Low-income Canadians are nearly four times more likely to die from opioids than the rich
New study is the first to examine the connection between socioeconomic status and opioid incidents in Canada  By A new study reveals a connection between poverty and opioid-related hospitalization, emergency department visits and deaths in Canada. From 2000 to 2017, Canada's poorest residents were 3.8 times more likely to die of opioid-related causes than Canada's richest residents.

Health - Pharmacology - 29.06.2022
Hormone-blocking breakthrough helps combat skin cancer recurrence
Hormone-blocking breakthrough helps combat skin cancer recurrence
A Monash University researcher has helped discover how to reduce the recurrence of skin cancer tumours by blocking a naturally-occurring hormone that causes drug resistance in melanoma cells. Studies showed that by blocking androgens - the 'male' sex hormones - with the drug enzalutamide, melanoma cells were more sensitive to drugs designed to inhibit cancer growth.

Health - 29.06.2022
Nearly 9 in 10 Detroit eviction cases filed during pandemic involved illegal rentals
DETROIT-Despite pandemic-related eviction prevention measures, thousands of Detroit renters were evicted in the past two years due to loopholes in policies and enforcement. Study (PDF): Crisis before the emergency: Evictions in Detroit before and after the onset of COVID-19 Analysis of court data by University of Michigan researchers shows nearly 90% of eviction cases filed in Detroit during the pandemic came from landlords whose properties were not in compliance with the city's rental ordinance.

Health - Pharmacology - 28.06.2022
Highly Effective Memory B Cells Localized in the Lungs
How can we increase the efficacy of vaccines used to protect against viral respiratory diseases such as influenza and COVID-19? Scientists from Inserm, CNRS and Aix-Marseille Université at the Center of Immunology Marseille-Luminy are opening up new prospects in the field, with the triggering of memory B cells directly in the lungs looking to be a promising avenue.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded
Binge eating bye bye: Signaling pathway in the brain to control food intake decoded A group of researchers has found a completely new approach to treating eating disorders. The scientists have demonstrated that a group of nerve cells in the hypothalamus (known as AgRP, agouti-related peptide neurons) control the release of endogenous lysophospholipids, which in turn control the excitability of nerve cells in the cerebral cortex, stimulating food intake.

Economics / Business - Health - 28.06.2022
Messaging on healthy foods may not prompt healthier purchases: study
Messaging on healthy foods may not prompt healthier purchases: study
Healthy food cues standing alone don't prompt healthier buying decisions, but they may counter advertising for sugary and fatty foods, says study co-authored by Cambridge researchers. People making food-buying choices are often faced with adverts or other descriptions such as -low calorie- (healthy) or -tasty- (less healthy) to influence their decisions, so how effective are health-conscious nudges in moving consumer behaviour toward healthier lifestyles?

Health - Psychology - 28.06.2022
Racism and discrimination harm health
Long-term changes in the stress hormone cortisol can lead to disease Individuals with an immigrant background often face experiences of discrimination. Experiencing discrimination based on ethnic background is associated with stress and affects mental and physical health. A team led by psychologist Ricarda Nater-Mewes of the University of Vienna has now shown that the frequency of experiences of racism is related to physical stress indicators.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Maternal microbiome promotes healthy development of the baby
Maternal microbiome promotes healthy development of the baby
Researchers studying mice have found the first evidence of how a mother's gut microbes can help in the development of the placenta, and the healthy growth of the baby. This study, carried out in mice, identifies the maternal microbiome as a new player in the communication between mother, placenta and fetus.

Health - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
Centenarians' offspring share their unique footprint
Centenarians’ offspring share their unique footprint
A genetic analysis of centenarians- descendants reveals a specific genetic footprint that may explain why they are less frail than descendants of non-centenarians of the same age. This is the main conclusion of a study led by the University of Valencia (UV), the CIBER for Fragility and Healthy Aging (CIBERFES), and the Health Research Institute (INCLIVA) that has been published in The Journals of Gerontology .

Health - Pharmacology - 28.06.2022
Highly antibiotic-resistant strain of MRSA that arose in pigs can jump to humans
A new study has found that a highly antibiotic-resistant strain of the superbug MRSA - methicillin resistant Staphylococcus aureus - has emerged in livestock in the last 50 years, probably due to widespread antibiotic use in pig farming. Cases of livestock-associated MRSA in humans are still only a small fraction of all MRSA cases in human populations, but the fact that they-re increasing is a worrying sign.

Health - 28.06.2022
Innovative lung-imaging technique shows cause of long-COVID symptoms
By having study participants inhale polarized xenon gas while inside the MRI, the researchers see in real-time the function of the 300'500 million tiny alveolar sacs, which are responsible for delivering oxygen to the blood. (Supplied photo/Paulina Wyszkiewicz) Many who experience what is now called 'long-COVID' report feeling brain fog, breathless, fatigued and limited in doing everyday things, often lasting weeks and months post-infection.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2022
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
Tracking down the causes of rare diseases in children
The causes of intelligence impairment or epilepsy remain unexplained in more than 50 per cent of cases. Together with international colleagues, researchers at Leipzig University Hospital have discovered two genes with mutations that cause neurodevelopmental disorders in children. Their findings have now been published in scientific journals.

Health - Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
New Genetic Associations in Pediatric NAFLD Affect Both Risk and Severity
Paired studies in children further identify differences between pediatric and adult diseases and may inform future treatments in a chronic childhood disease In a pair of overlapping studies, a diverse team of researchers, led by scientists at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, have deepened investigations into the genetic origins of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in children, describing multiple gene variants (including some previously unknown) that contribute to the risk of developing NAFLD and gene variants associated with the severity of the liver disease.

Health - 27.06.2022
Researchers look at space between nerves and tumor cells to identify most aggressive oral cancers
One of the most terrifying aspects of cancer is its unpredictability: Some cancerous tumors are cured by treatment, while others shrink with treatment only to return later. Study: Spatial and Transcriptomic Analysis of Perineural Invasion in Oral Cancer A new University of Michigan study identifies a feature in cancer that could help pinpoint treatment-resistant tumors when they are diagnosed, so oncologists know to treat aggressively from the beginning, with the hope of giving patients a better chance at survival.
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