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Health - Mathematics - 18.01.2021
Metastasis starts
Metastasis starts
A mathematical study describes how metastasis starts Research by the UC3M and UCM A scientific study carried out by the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM) has produced a mathematical description of the way in which a tumor invades the epithelial cells and automatically quantifies the progression of the tumor and the remaining cell islands after its progression.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 13.01.2021
Mathematics explains how giant ’whirlpools’ form in developing egg cells
The swirling currents occur when the rodlike structures that extend inward from the cells' membranes bend in tandem, like stalks of wheat caught in a strong breeze, according to a study from the University of Cambridge and the Flatiron Institute. The mechanism of the swirling instability is disarmingly simple, and the agreement between our calculations and experimental observations supports the idea that this is indeed the process at work in fruit fly egg cells Raymond Goldstein Egg cells are among the largest cells in the animal kingdom.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 04.01.2021
Researchers compute turbulence with artificial intelligence
Researchers compute turbulence with artificial intelligence
For the first time, researchers at ETH Zurich have successfully automated the modelling of turbulence. Their project relies on fusing reinforcement learning algorithms with turbulent flow simulations on the CSCS supercomputer "Piz Daint". The modelling and simulation of turbulent flows is crucial for designing cars and heart valves, predicting the weather, and even retracing the birth of a galaxy.

Physics - Mathematics - 18.12.2020
UofG researchers set out for New Horizons
Researchers from the University of Glasgow's College of Science & Engineering are sharing in new funding for adventurous, high-risk research. Four projects from three Schools have received support from the £25.5m New Horizons fund, administered by the Engineering and Physical Science Research Council (EPSRC).

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 03.12.2020
The same visual system for all primates
The same visual system for all primates
The world's smallest primate reveals the incredible preservation of our visual system through millions of years of evolution. Primates process visual information in front of their eyes, similar to pixels in a digital camera, using small computing units located in the visual cortex of their brains.

Pedagogy - Mathematics - 27.11.2020
Storybooks could help children’s maths
Tutoring programmes and storybooks can help improve children's attainment in maths, according to a new evidence review led by UCL researchers. The evidence review, published today by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) and written by a team from the UCL Institute of Education, the University of Brighton, Loughborough University and Ulster University, synthesises the best international evidence about the teaching and learning mathematics for children in Early Years and Key Stage 1 (between the ages of 3 and 7).

Mathematics - Health - 07.10.2020
Faster COVID-19 testing with simple algebraic equations
A mathematician from Cardiff University has developed a new method for processing large volumes of COVID-19 tests which he believes could lead to significantly more tests being performed at once and results being returned much quicker. Dr Usama Kadri, from the University's School of Mathematics, believes the new technique could allow many more patients to be tested using the same amount of tests tubes and with a lower possibility of false negatives occurring.

Mathematics - Computer Science - 05.10.2020
Scientists Solve 90-Year-Old Geometry Problem
Math puzzle resolved by translating it into satisfiability problem Carnegie Mellon University computer scientists and mathematicians have resolved the last, stubborn piece of Keller's conjecture, a geometry problem that scientists have puzzled over for 90 years. By structuring the puzzle as what computer scientists call a satisfiability problem, the researchers put the problem to rest with four months of frenzied computer programming and just 30 minutes of computation using a cluster of computers.

Health - Mathematics - 23.09.2020
When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
When does a second COVID surge end? Look at the maths
Mathematicians have analysed COVID-19 infection rates from all US states. The results suggest public health officials shouldn't relax restrictions until surge periods are demonstrably over. They also used the method to look at Australian infection rates. When applied to Victoria, the new methodology shows the state in its second COVID-19 surge, as expected.

Health - Mathematics - 20.08.2020
Working from home is more effective than keeping kids off school in tackling Covid - new study
Closing schools and shielding the over 60s has less of an effect in reducing Covid-19 transmissions and death rates than reducing workplace interactions A 30% reduction in workplace interactions is forecasted to result in a 62% reduction in new infections and a 54% reduction in new deaths by the end of 2020 compared with no additional interventions Enabling employees to work from home is more effective than keeping children off school, or shielding the over 60s in reducing new Covid infections, new deaths and total deaths.

Health - Mathematics - 06.08.2020
Mathematical program helps perform more efficient radiosurgery
Mathematical program helps perform more efficient radiosurgery
Engineers at EPFL and local startup Intuitive Therapeutics have developed software that can produce optimized surgical plans for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Doctors at the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) began using the software in July. Radiosurgery is a kind of radiotherapy where doctors administer a high dose of radiation to diseased tissue with extreme precision, and in one go rather than over several sessions.

Health - Mathematics - 06.08.2020
Mathematical program helps doctors perform more efficient radiosurger
Mathematical program helps doctors perform more efficient radiosurger
Engineers at EPFL and local startup Intuitive Therapeutics have developed software that can produce optimized surgical plans for Gamma Knife radiosurgery. Doctors at the Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) began using the software in July. Radiosurgery is a kind of radiotherapy where doctors administer a high dose of radiation to diseased tissue with extreme precision, and in one go rather than over several sessions.

Physics - Mathematics - 29.07.2020
’Quantum negativity’ can power ultra-precise measurements
Scientists have found that a physical property called 'quantum negativity' can be used to take more precise measurements of everything from molecular distances to gravitational waves. We've shown that filtering quantum particles can condense the information of a million particles into one David Arvidsson-Shukur The researchers, from the University of Cambridge, Harvard and MIT, have shown that quantum particles can carry an unlimited amount of information about things they have interacted with.

Physics - Mathematics - 28.07.2020
Researchers develop tiny but tough lasers
Researchers develop tiny but tough lasers
An international team of scientists led by The Australian National University (ANU) researchers has developed a new robust type of light technology that could lead to cheaper and faster devices. The team created a laser that is immune to fabrication imperfections and external disturbances, such as unwanted light reflections and scatterings.

Health - Mathematics - 23.07.2020
If relaxed too soon, physical distancing measures might have been all for naught
If physical distancing measures in the United States are relaxed while there is still no COVID-19 vaccine or treatment and while personal protective equipment remains in short supply, the number of resulting infections could be about the same as if distancing had never been implemented to begin with, according to a UCLA-led team of mathematicians and scientists.

Health - Mathematics - 21.07.2020
"Winter is coming": the influence of seasonality on pathogen emergence
Seasonal fluctuations drive the dynamics of many infectious diseases. For instance, the flu spreads more readily in winter. Two scientists from the University of Nantes 1 and the CNRS 2 in Montpellier have developed a mathematical model to predict the risk of the emergence of an epidemic, depending on the time of the year at which the pathogen is introduced.

Mathematics - Health - 09.07.2020
Doing more with less: Sperm without a fully active tail move faster and more efficiently, new UK study finds
Sperm cells moving their long tail to swim through the body in search of an egg is a familiar image, but a fully 'powered' tail may not be the key to success, according to a new UK study which could be crucial for improving the outcomes of assisted fertility treatments. Propulsion of sperm and how the cell uses its tail to move through the thick fluids of the reproductive tract to reach and fertilise an egg has been well studied.

Environment - Mathematics - 06.07.2020
Behind the dead-water phenomenon
Behind the dead-water phenomenon
What makes ships mysteriously slow down or even stop as they travel, even though their engines are working properly? This was first observed in 1893 and was described experimentally in 1904 without all the secrets of this "dead water" being understood. An interdisciplinary team from the CNRS and the University of Poitiers has explained this phenomenon for the first time: the speed changes in ships trapped in dead water are due to waves that act like an undulating conveyor belt on which the boats move back and forth.

Mathematics - Economics / Business - 03.07.2020
New mathematical principle used to prevent AI from making unethical decisions
A new mathematical principle has been designed to combat AI bias towards making unethical and costly commercial choices. Researchers from the University of Warwick, Imperial College London, EPFL (Lausanne) and Sciteb Ltd have found a mathematical means of helping regulators and businesses manage artificial intelligence (AI) systems' biases towards making unethical, and potentially very costly and damaging, commercial choices.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 03.07.2020
Analysis: How the brain builds a sense of self from the people around us - new research
MBPhD researcher Sam Ereira (UCL Medical School) shares his research on brains and discusses how we distinguish between thinking about our minds versus those of others. We are highly sensitive to people around us. As infants, we observe our parents and teachers, and from them we learn how to walk, talk, read - and use smartphones.