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Health - Pedagogy - 28.07.2015
Chill-tolerant hybrid sugarcane also grows at lower temperatures
Chill-tolerant hybrid sugarcane also grows at lower temperatures
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Parents who have low health literacy are less likely to choose government-recommended weight-loss strategies, such as increasing physical activity or serving more fruits and vegetables, to help their children control their weight than parents who are better able to understand basic health-related information, a new study suggests.

Health - Pedagogy - 28.07.2015
Parents’ health literacy affects child weight-loss tactics, study finds
Parents level of health literacy determines the weight-control strategies they would choose for their children, according to a new study led by Janet Liechty, a professor of social work and of medicine. Dr. Salma M. A. Musaad, a visiting research biostatistician in human and community development, and social work doctoral student Jaclyn A. Saltzman were co-authors.

Philosophy - Pedagogy - 09.07.2015
Philosophy discussions for ten year olds can boost their reading and maths
Philosophy discussions for ten year olds can boost their reading and maths
We use cookies to ensure that we give you the best experience on our website. You can change your cookie settings at any time. Otherwise, we'll assume you're OK to continue. Philosophy discussions for ten year olds can boost their reading and maths Encouraging primary school pupils to have philosophical discussions can boost their maths and reading results, according to new research conducted by Durham University.

Pedagogy - Health - 08.07.2015
Researchers uncover motivations for the high level of prescribed antibiotics for children’s coughs
Researchers from the University of Bristol have investigated what leads to high use of antibiotics for children with coughs and found the motives for their use are complex but centre around children being vulnerable. GPs are responsible for 80 per cent of all antibiotic prescriptions in the UK and nearly half of these are for coughs, despite the fact that their effectiveness in treating coughs has been shown to be limited.

Pedagogy - 01.07.2015
Parenting course adapted for dads benefits the whole family
Parenting course adapted for dads benefits the whole family
Participation in parenting programs has traditionally been more likely to involve women, but new research suggests adapting The University of Queensland's Triple P - Positive Parenting Program can increase fathers' engagement and benefit the whole family. Triple P founder and UQ Parenting and Family Support Centre Director Professor Matt Sanders said an adapted program had led to improvements in children's behaviour, in fathers' parenting practices and in family relationships.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 19.06.2015
Children with good memories are better liars, research shows
Children who benefit from a good memory are much better at covering up lies, researchers from the University of Sheffield have discovered. Experts found a link between verbal memory and covering up lies following a study which investigated the role of working memory in verbal deception amongst children.

Pedagogy - 16.06.2015
Surprising truths about caregivers
Surprising truths about caregivers
Caregiving is a part of daily life for millions of Americans, particularly the so-called sandwich generation balancing the needs of aging parents with looking after their own children. A new study looks at just who is doing that caregiving, and who they're caring for - and some of the findings are surprising.

Health - Pedagogy - 15.06.2015
Mums and dads ape their mothers' parenting style, suggests study
Mums and dads ape their mothers’ parenting style, suggests study
Mothers' and fathers' parenting behaviour is more likely to resemble their own mothers' than their fathers', according to a new study. Researchers filmed 146 mothers and 146 fathers interacting with their young children, and used questionnaires to record their perceptions of the quality of parenting they received.

Health - Pedagogy - 01.06.2015
Inactivity in childhood linked to poor health outcomes in adolescence
How active you are as a child could have an impact on your weight and risk of chronic disease from as early fifteen years of age, according to new research led by the University of Sydney. The landmark study followed more than 4,600 children for four years and found that those who were more active in late childhood were healthier teens, with lower body fat and reduced risk factors for cardiovascular disease and diabetes.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 28.05.2015
Study on brain waves shows how different teaching methods affect reading development
Stanford Professor Bruce McCandliss found that beginning readers who focus on letter-sound relationships, or phonics, increase activity in the area of their brains best wired for reading . By May Wong Beginning readers who focus on letter-sound relationships, or phonics, instead of trying to learn whole words, increase activity in the area of their brains best wired for reading, according to new Stanford research investigating how the brain responds to different types of reading instruction.

Health - Pedagogy - 18.05.2015
Small changes to a child’s head size should not concern parents
Measuring the size of a child's head is done routinely worldwide to screen for possible learning or developmental problems but new research suggests that differences within the normal range of measurements are common - and mainly due to human error - and should not unduly concern parents. This new research, based on over 10,000 participants in Children of the 90s study calls into question the practical value of using head measurement as a screening test as it could mean many children undergo unnecessary tests such as MRI scans and referral to specialists.

Pedagogy - Career - 12.05.2015
Even in ’conservative’ West Germany, four fifths of mothers work
A study of 500 couples shows that only a fifth (21%) of couples born between 1956 and 1965 in 'conservative West Germany' followed the traditional model of having a stay-at-home mum and a male breadwinner as their children grew up. Oxford University researcher Laura Langner analysed decades of SOEP data gathered by the German Institute for Economic Research (DIW), in which households were ed on a yearly basis.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 07.05.2015
Children behave worse in families in which dads feel unsupported, Sussex study finds
Children behave worse in families in which dads feel unsupported, Sussex study finds
Children behave worse in families in which dads feel unsupported, Sussex study finds Children are more likely to display troublesome behaviour in families in which the father feels unsupported by his partner, a new University of Sussex study has revealed. The findings by doctoral researcher Rachel Latham will be presented today, Thursday 7 May 2015, at the annual conference of the British Psychology Society being held in Liverpool.

Health - Pedagogy - 23.04.2015
When is a child too sick for daycare? Study explores parents’ decision-making
It's a common dilemma faced by many working parents: your child has a cough or a cold, do you send them to nursery? Researchers from the University of Bristol have, for the first time, investigated the process of decision-making that parents go through when faced with this situation. The research, published in The Journal of Public Health , reports that parents viewed coughs and colds as less serious and not as contagious as sickness and diarrhoea symptoms.

Pedagogy - 13.04.2015
Private schools show same results as public schools
Birth weight, the amount of time a mother spends with her child, and the education level of both parents will have more impact on a child than whether they attend a private or public school. Those are the findings of a study co-authored by University of Queensland Faculty of Health and Behavioural Sciences duo Professor Luke Connelly and Dr Hong Son Nghiem.

Pedagogy - 09.04.2015
Independent review shows UQ program helps children with disabilities
Independent review shows UQ program helps children with disabilities
Parents of children with developmental disabilities can take heart from new research which shows that a University of Queensland program can reduce serious emotional and behavioural problems. A study by US researchers published in the journal Research in Developmental Disabilities has found that parenting programs, particularly UQ's Stepping Stones Triple P program , were likely to reduce aggression, noncompliance and defiance in children with developmental disabilities, such as autism and learning disabilities.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 05.03.2015
U.S.-Born Children of Undocumented Parents Report Anxiety and Depression Symptoms
U.S.-Born Children of Undocumented Parents Report Anxiety and Depression Symptoms
AUSTIN, Texas - U.S.-born children of undocumented parents experience elevated levels of anxiety, and if their parents were detained or deported, those children are more likely to report depressive symptoms, according to new research from The University of Texas at Austin. The study was led by Luis H. Zayas, dean of UT Austin's School of Social Work, and published online in the January issue of Journal of Child and Family Studies .

Pedagogy - Health - 26.02.2015
Undocumented Mexican immigrants' kids have higher risk of behavior problems
"We found that treating Mexican children with immigrant parents as a single undifferentiated group masks important differences in outcomes by parental legal status," said Landale. WASHINGTON, DC, - Children of undocumented Mexican immigrants have a significantly higher risk of behavior problems than their co-ethnic counterparts with documented or naturalized citizen mothers, according to a team of sociologists.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 29.01.2015
Hispanic immigrants spank children less
ANN ARBOR-Immigrant Hispanic parents spank their young children less often than U.S.-born Hispanic parents, a new University of Michigan study found. The findings show that cultural values may help Hispanic immigrants maintain positive parenting practices and parent-child relationships, despite, on average, greater financial pressures and other factors often associated with greater use of spanking.

Pedagogy - Health - 27.01.2015
Communication is key when dealing with aging parents
The goal of the research was not to identify whether individuals are "stubborn," but rather to understand perceptions of older parents and their adult children regarding such behavior. UNIVERSITY PARK, Pa. Headstrong elderly parents and their adult children may be able to find common ground with proper intervention, according to researchers in human development.
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