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Paleontology - Life Sciences - 10.01.2022
Jurassic Giant - The Largest Marine Reptile Skeleton Ever Unearthed in Britain
Jurassic Giant - The Largest Marine Reptile Skeleton Ever Unearthed in Britain
Palaeontologists working on the Ichthyosaur skeleton found at Rutland Water August 26 2021 Matthew Power Photography www.matthewpowerphotography.co.uk 07969 088655 matthew@matthe

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 05.01.2022
A crab's'eye view of the ancient world
A crab’s’eye view of the ancient world
Their legs may get more attention, but a new study says a crab's eyes have much to offer, too - at least scientifically.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.12.2021
An ancient relative of Velociraptor is unearthed in Great Britain
An ancient relative of Velociraptor is unearthed in Great Britain
A new bird-like dinosaur has been found by paleontologists combing through fossils found on the Isle of Wight.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 15.12.2021
Reconstruction of a Cretaceous fossil water plant found in Catalonia using its plant organs
Reconstruction of a Cretaceous fossil water plant found in Catalonia using its plant organs
Palaeonitella trifurcate is the name of a new fossil species of a freshwater plant from the Lower Cretaceous found and reconstructed by a team of geologists of the University of Barcelona. The reconstruction of the plant, dating from between 125 and 120 million years ago, has been conducted using the plant organs found separately in a stratum of limestone from the Natural Park of Garraf, in Olivella (Barcelona).

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 07.12.2021
Fleshing out the bones of Quetzalcoatlus, Earth’s largest flier ever
An artist's rendition of Quetzalcoatlus northropi, a type of pterosaur and the largest flying animal that ever lived on Earth.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 30.11.2021
Dinosaurs and amber: a site in Teruel opens a unique window to the Cretaceous world from 110 million years ago
Dinosaurs and amber: a site in Teruel opens a unique window to the Cretaceous world from 110 million years ago
New findings of amber in the site of Ario in Teruel have enabled the reconstruction of a swampy paleoenvironment with a rich coastal resin forest from 110 million years ago, from the era of dinosaurs. This place featured conifers and understories of gymnosperms and ferns, and flower plants, where insects, turtles, crocodiles, mammals and dinosaurs such as the species Proa valdearinnoensis and E uropelta carbonensis lived.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 29.11.2021
Nibbling prehistoric herbivore sheds new light on Triassic diversity
Nibbling prehistoric herbivore sheds new light on Triassic diversity
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email A Triassic herbivore, known for its supposed similarities to a modern-day ostrich, has been revealed to have entire

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 29.11.2021
Extinct swordfish-shaped marine reptile discovered
Extinct swordfish-shaped marine reptile discovered
A new 130-million-year-old marine reptile fossil sheds light on the evolution of hypercarnivory of these last-surviving ichthyosaurs A team of international researchers from Canada, Colombia, and Germany has discovered a new marine reptile.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 22.11.2021
California researchers, with assist from U-M, recover mammoth tusk during deep-sea expedition
California researchers, with assist from U-M, recover mammoth tusk during deep-sea expedition
The ocean's dark depths hold many secrets. For more than three decades, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute has been exploring the deep waters off the coast of central California.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 09.11.2021
Fossil elephant cranium reveals key adaptations that enabled its species to thrive as grasslands spread across eastern Africa
Fossil elephant cranium reveals key adaptations that enabled its species to thrive as grasslands spread across eastern Africa
A remarkably well-preserved fossil elephant cranium from Kenya is helping scientists understand how its species became the dominant elephant in eastern Africa several million years ago, a time when a

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 14.10.2021
Mammals on the menu: Snake dietary diversity exploded after mass extinction 66 million years ago
Mammals on the menu: Snake dietary diversity exploded after mass extinction 66 million years ago
Modern snakes evolved from ancestors that lived side by side with the dinosaurs and that likely fed mainly on insects and lizards.

Paleontology - Environment - 04.10.2021
New 'lost relative' of Triceratops found in New Mexico
New ’lost relative’ of Triceratops found in New Mexico
The skeleton fragments of a new horned dinosaur, Sierraceratops turneri, have been discovered in North America.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.09.2021
Four dinosaurs in Montana: Fieldwork pieces together life at the end of 'Dinosaur Era'
Four dinosaurs in Montana: Fieldwork pieces together life at the end of ’Dinosaur Era’
UW, Burke researchers discover four dinosaurs in Montana: Fieldwork pieces together life at the end of 'Dinosaur Era' A team of paleontologists from the University of Washington and its Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture excavated four dinosaurs in northeastern Montana this summer.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 10.08.2021
'fearsome dragon' that soared over outback Queensland
’fearsome dragon’ that soared over outback Queensland
Australia's largest flying reptile has been uncovered, a pterosaur with an estimated seven-metre wingspan that soared like a dragon above the ancient, vast inland sea once covering much of outback Queensland.

Environment - Paleontology - 22.07.2021
Huge Jurassic seabed uncovered in Cotswolds quarry
Huge Jurassic seabed uncovered in Cotswolds quarry
One of the largest and most important finds of exquisitely preserved Jurassic echinoderms - spiny-skinned marine animals such as starfish and sea urchins - has been uncovered by a University of Birmingham Research Associate.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 23.06.2021
The origins of farming insects: ambrosia fungi cultivated by beetles for more than 100 million years
The origins of farming insects: ambrosia fungi cultivated by beetles for more than 100 million years
A beetle bores a tree trunk to build a gallery in the wood in order to protect its lay. As it digs the tunnel, it spreads ambrosia fungal spores that will feed the larvae. When these bore another tree, the adult beetles will be the transmission vectors of the fungal spores in another habitat. This mutualism among insects and ambrosia fungi could be more than 100 years old -more than what was thought to date- according to an article published in the journal Biological Reviews .

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 02.06.2021
Young T. rexes were deadly despite bite force one-sixth that of adults
Jack Tseng loves bone-crunching animals - hyenas are his favorite - so when paleontologist Joseph Peterson discovered fossilized dinosaur bones that had teeth marks from a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex ,

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.05.2021
Pandemic-era paleontology: A wayward skull, at-home fossil analyses and a first for Antarctic amphibians
Pandemic-era paleontology: A wayward skull, at-home fossil analyses and a first for Antarctic amphibians
Paleontologists had to adjust to stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many had to postpone fossil excavations, temporarily close museums and teach the next generation of fossil hunters virtually instead of in person.

Paleontology - Environment - 04.05.2021
Biogeographical affinity in Cretaceous flora from two islands of the old Tethys Ocean
Biogeographical affinity in Cretaceous flora from two islands of the old Tethys Ocean
A study published in Cretaceous Research expands the paleontological richness of continental fossils of the Lower Cretaceous with the discovery of a new water plant (charophytes), the species Mesochara dobrogeica . The study also identifies a new variety of carophytes from the Clavator genus (in particular, Clavator ampullaceus var.

Paleontology - 21.04.2021
Tarantula’s Ubiquity Traced Back to the Cretaceous
Carnegie Mellon University April 21, 2021 Tarantulas are among the most notorious spiders, due in part to their size and vibrant colors. With their prevalence throughout the world, it may be surprising to learn that tarantulas are actually homebodies. Females and their young rarely leave their burrows and only mature males will wander to seek out a mate.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 15.04.2021
How many T. rexes were there? Billions
Over approximately 2.5 million years, North America likely hosted 2.5 billion Tyrannosaurus rexes, a minuscule proportion of which have been dug up and studied by paleontologists, according to a UC Berkeley study.

Paleontology - 09.03.2021
Younger Tyrannosaurus Rex bites were less ferocious than their adult counterparts
Younger Tyrannosaurus Rex bites were less ferocious than their adult counterparts
By closely examining the jaw mechanics of juvenile and adult tyrannosaurids, some of the fiercest dinosaurs to inhabit earth, scientists led by the University of Bristol have uncovered differences in how they bit into their prey.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 24.02.2021
Our earliest primate ancestors rapidly spread after dinosaur extinction
Our earliest primate ancestors rapidly spread after dinosaur extinction
The small, furry ancestors of all primates - a group that includes humans and other apes - were already taking to the trees a mere 100,000 years after the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 24.02.2021
Earliest primate fossils
Earliest primate fossils
A new study published Feb. 24 in the journal Royal Society Open Science documents the earliest-known fossil evidence of primates.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 21.12.2020
Study resolves the position of fleas on the tree of life
A study of more than 1,400 protein-coding genes of fleas has resolved one of the longest standing mysteries in the evolution of insects, reordering their placement in the tree of life and pinpointing who their closest relatives are. The University of Bristol study, published in the journal Palaeoentomology , drew on the largest insect molecular dataset available.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 01.12.2020
William Clemens, expert on fossil mammals, dies at 88
Bill Clemens had been excavating fossils in eastern Montana's Hell Creek Formation for more than 10 years, focusing primarily on the small mammals that scurried around the feet of dinosaurs and other

Paleontology - Environment - 27.10.2020
Antarctica yields oldest fossils of giant birds with 21-foot wingspans
An artist's depiction of ancient albatrosses harassing a pelagornithid - with its fearsome toothed beak - as penguins frolic in the oceans around Antarctica 50 million years ago.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 22.10.2020
Bat-winged dinosaurs that could glide
Despite having bat-like wings, two small dinosaurs, Yi and Ambopteryx, struggled to fly, only managing to glide clumsily between the trees where they lived, according to a new study led by an international team of researchers, including McGill University Professor Hans Larsson. Unable to compete with other tree-dwelling dinosaurs and early birds, they went extinct after just a few million years.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 16.10.2020
World’s greatest mass extinction triggered switch to warm-bloodedness
The origin of endothermy in synapsids, including the ancestors of mammals. The diagram shows the evolution of main groups through the Triassic, and the scale from blue to red is a measure of the degree of warm-bloodedness reconstructed based on different indicators of bone structure and anatomy.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 27.08.2020
Weathering the tough times: Fossil evidence of 'hibernation-like' state in 250-million-year-old Antarctic animal
Weathering the tough times: Fossil evidence of ’hibernation-like’ state in 250-million-year-old Antarctic animal
Hibernation is a familiar feature on Earth today. Many animals - especially those that live close to or within polar regions - hibernate to get through the tough winter months when food is scarce, temperatures drop and days are dark.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 02.07.2020
New species of Ichthyosaur discovered in museum collection
Hauffiopteryx altera (Latin for different from ) has been identified as a new species of Ichthyosaurs by researchers from McGill University and the State Museum of Natural History Stuttgart in Germany.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 17.06.2020
Tracking Australia's gigantic carnivorous dinosaurs
Tracking Australia’s gigantic carnivorous dinosaurs
North America had the T. rex , South America had the Giganotosaurus and Africa the Spinosaurus - now evidence shows Australia had gigantic predatory dinosaurs. The discovery came in University of Queensland research, led by palaeontologist Dr Anthony Romilio , which analysed southern Queensland dinosaur footprint fossils dated to the latter part of the Jurassic Period, between 165 and 151 million-year-ago.

Paleontology - History / Archeology - 11.06.2020
Diving for the Bones of the Ice Age
Cave divers carefully maneuver the giant ground sloth's pelvis through Hoyo Negro. Photo Credit: Sam Meacham, CINDAQ F or thousands of years, the massive pelvis lay undisturbed at the bottom of the watery black pit.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 29.05.2020
When Somerset lay beneath the sea
The evidence consists of limestone pebbles that carry borings made by molluscs as well as oysters. These pebbles were torn up from the underlying Carboniferous limestone which formed the basic landscape all over Somerset and across the Severn Estuary to South Wales.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 13.05.2020

Paleontology - 13.05.2020
T. rex was a champion walker, super-efficient at lower speeds
While smaller dinosaurs needed speed, huge predators like T. rex were optimized for energy-efficient walking, according to a study published in PLOS ONE.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 24.04.2020
'Dino Cave' reveals dinosaur crouch walkers
’Dino Cave’ reveals dinosaur crouch walkers
Old photos from Mount Morgan's sealed off 'Dino Cave' have shed light onto new and unusual Aussie dinosaur behaviours, thanks to University of Queensland research.

Earth Sciences - Paleontology - 25.03.2020
In Earth’s largest extinction, land die-offs began long before ocean turnover
Researchers dated ash deposits from this hill, called a koppie in South Africa. The lower part of koppie Loskop exposes strata from before the end-Permian extinction (Palingkloof Member of the Balfour Formation), while the upper part contains layers deposited after the extinction (Katberg Formation).

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 21.02.2020
Fossilized wing gives clues about Labrador’s biodiversityduring the Cretaceous
Channels McGill University News and Events A fossilised insect wing discovered in an abandoned mine in Labrador has led palaeontologists from McGill University and the University of Gda'sk to identify a new hairy cicada species that lived around 100 million years ago.

Earth Sciences - Paleontology - 17.02.2020
The dinosaur in the cupboard under the stairs
The dinosaur in the cupboard under the stairs
The mystery surrounding dinosaur footprints on a cave ceiling in Central Queensland has been solved after more than a half a century. University of Queensland palaeontologist Dr Anthony Romilio discovered pieces to a decades-old puzzle in an unusual place - a cupboard under the stairs of a suburban Sydney home.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 31.01.2020
Our image of dinosaurs was shaped by Victorian popularity contests
Our knowledge of dinosaurs has expanded greatly since the public first became aware of their existence, but the history of these animals encompasses more than just the fossils themselves, writes Richard Fallon (UCL Science & Technology Studies).

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 11.12.2019
Newly described fossil whale represents intermediate stage between foot-powered and tail-powered swimming
Newly described fossil whale represents intermediate stage between foot-powered and tail-powered swimming
oe中文 हिन्दी Portugus Español Share on: Share on Twitter Share on Facebook Share on LinkedIn A newly described fossil whale represents a new species and an important step in the evolution of whale locomotion, according to a University of Michigan paleontologist and his colleagues.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 03.10.2019

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 27.09.2019
Fish story for the ages: High schooler unearths rare fossil
Each summer, the University of Chicago welcomes high school students from around the world for a unique course on paleontology, which culminates with two weeks of fieldwork spent hunting for fossils.

Paleontology - Environment - 18.09.2019
Coral reefs and squat lobsters flourished 150 million years ago
This modern porcelain crab is really a member of the squat lobster family that became adapted to the same intertidal environment as true crabs.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 21.08.2019

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 15.08.2019
Women don beards to highlight gender bias in science
Leslea Hlusko, a paleoanthropologist, with primate skull casts in Berkeley's Human Evolution Research Center.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 20.06.2019
Mammals and their relatives thrived, diversified during so-called 'Age of Dinosaurs,' researchers show
Mammals and their relatives thrived, diversified during so-called ’Age of Dinosaurs,’ researchers show
Paleontologists are trying to dispel a myth about what life was like when dinosaurs roamed the Earth. The false narrative has wormed its way into books, lectures and even scientific papers about this long-ago era. The myth's focus isn't on dinosaurs. Its main characters are ancient mammals and their relatives, which together are known as mammaliaforms.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 06.06.2019
Shakes up sloth family tree
One of the world's leading economists explains why our communities could hold the answer to many of society's problems. Sloths once roamed the Americas, ranging from tiny, cat-sized animals that lived in trees all the way up to massive ground sloths that may have weighed up to six tons. The only species we know and love today, however, are the two-toed and three-toed sloths-but paleontologists have been arguing how to classify them, and their ancestors, for decades.