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Paleontology - Environment - 28.11.2022
Beavers Have Lived in Family Clans in the Allgäu for More Than Eleven Million Years
Beavers Have Lived in Family Clans in the Allgäu for More Than Eleven Million Years
For paleontologists, Hammerschmiede in the Allgäu region, the site where the great ape Danuvius was discovered, is a treasure trove unlike any other: more than 140 fossil vertebrate species have been found here.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 21.11.2022
Going to the 'femoral head' of the class to explain dinosaur evolution
Going to the ’femoral head’ of the class to explain dinosaur evolution
A new study by Yale paleontologists charts the radical evolutionary changes to the thigh bones of dinosaurs and birds that allowed them to stand on two feet. Dinosaurs - and birds - wouldn't have been able to stand on their own two feet without some radical changes to their upper thigh bones. Now, a new study by Yale paleontologists charts the evolutionary course of these leggy alterations.

Earth Sciences - Paleontology - 20.10.2022
How old is Yosemite Valley?
Tenaya Canyon (center) and part of Yosemite Valley (foreground) as seen from Glacier Point in Yosemite National Park.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 30.09.2022
What a reptile's bones can teach us about Earth's perilous past
What a reptile’s bones can teach us about Earth’s perilous past
An extinct reptile's oddly shaped chompers, fingers, and ear bones may tell us quite a bit about the resilience of life on Earth, according to a new study. In fact, paleontologists at Yale, Sam Houston State University, and the University of the Witwatersrand say the 250-million-year-old reptile, known as Palacrodon, fills in an important gap in our understanding of reptile evolution.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 31.08.2022
Worldwide flower family bloomed 50 million years before the dinosaurs
Worldwide flower family bloomed 50 million years before the dinosaurs
New Curtin-led research has discovered that a group of flowering plants with more than one thousand species worldwide is 150 million years older than botanists previously believed.

Paleontology - 25.08.2022
The talking dead: burials inform migrations in Indonesia
The talking dead: burials inform migrations in Indonesia
The discovery of three anicent bodies on Indonesia's Alor Island tells new stories of the earliest humans in island Southeast Asia. If three ancient bodies buried in Indonesia could talk, researchers from The Australian National University (ANU) say they would tell stories of the earliest humans in island Southeast Asia.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 24.08.2022
Fossils of giant sea lizard that ruled the oceans 66 million years ago
Fossils of giant sea lizard that ruled the oceans 66 million years ago
Fossils of a giant killer mosasaur have been discovered, along with the fossilised remains of its prey.

Paleontology - 19.08.2022

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 29.07.2022
'Fossil Fishing at the Farm' - Jurassic marine world unearthed in a farmer's field
’Fossil Fishing at the Farm’ - Jurassic marine world unearthed in a farmer’s field
The discovery of an exceptional prehistoric site containing the remains of animals that lived in a tropical sea has been made in a farmer's field in Gloucestershire. Discovered beneath a field grazed by an ancient breed of English Longhorn cattle, the roughly 183-million-year-old fossils are stunningly well preserved like they were frozen in time.

Paleontology - Environment - 26.07.2022
Plesiosaur fossils found in the Sahara suggest they weren't just marine animals
Plesiosaur fossils found in the Sahara suggest they weren’t just marine animals
This discovery of plesiosaur fossils in an ancient riverbed suggests some species, traditionally thought to be sea creatures, may have lived in freshwater.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 18.07.2022
Opinion: Ancient salamander was hidden inside mystery rock for 50 years
Opinion: Ancient salamander was hidden inside mystery rock for 50 years
Writing in The Conversation, Dr Marc Jones and Professor Susan Evans (UCL Cell & Developmental Biology) and Professor Richard Benson (University of Oxford) write about their research into a newly-identified extinct salamander species found in Scotland.

Paleontology - 07.06.2022
How plesiosaurs swam underwater
How plesiosaurs swam underwater
Plesiosaurs, which lived about 210 million years ago, adapted to life underwater in a unique way: their front and hind legs evolved in the course of evolution to form four uniform, wing-like flippers.

Paleontology - 19.05.2022
Previously unknown crocodile species lived in Asia 39 million years ago
Previously unknown crocodile species lived in Asia 39 million years ago
Based on the many fossil finds of false gharial relatives from North Africa and Europe, palaeontologists believe that this crocodile species originated more than 50 million years ago in the western Tethys, a precursor to today's Mediterranean Sea.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 10.05.2022
Chile's first complete ichthyosaur recovered from a glacier in Patagonia
Chile’s first complete ichthyosaur recovered from a glacier in Patagonia
The fossilised remains of Chile's first complete ichthyosaur have been unearthed from a melting glacier deep in the Patagonia area of the South American country.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 10.05.2022
Whales evolved in three rapid phases, reveals largest study of its kind
Whales evolved in three rapid phases, reveals largest study of its kind
The diversity seen in whale skulls was achieved through three key periods of rapid evolution, reveals a new study led by researchers at UCL and the Natural History Museum. The study, published in Current Biology , gathered the most expansive 3D scan data set ever for Cetacea (whale) skulls spanning 88 living species (representing 95% of extant cetacean species) and 113 fossil species and covering 50 million years of evolution.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 05.05.2022
Was this hyena a distant ancestor of today’s termite-eating aardwolf?
An artist's reconstruction of the Gansu hyena, perhaps a meat eater on its way to becoming an insect eater, like today's aardwolf.

Paleontology - Environment - 14.04.2022

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 04.04.2022
T. rex’s short arms may have lowered risk of bites during feeding frenzies
A lifesize cast of T. rex in the atrium of UC Berkeley's Valley Life Sciences Building shows how peculiarly short the forearms were, given that the creature was the most ferocious predator of its day.

Event - Paleontology - 31.03.2022

Paleontology - Environment - 31.03.2022
Expert Insight: Traces of giant prehistoric crocodiles discovered in northern British Columbia
Giant crocodiles once roamed northeastern British Columbia. A recently published article in Historical Biology features the first detailed trace fossil evidence ever reported of giant crocodylians. The sites are from the Peace Region of northeastern British Columbia, north of Tumbler Ridge. The trace fossils include swim traces , made when the crocodiles were scraping the muddy bottoms of lakes and river channels with their claws.

Paleontology - Environment - 11.01.2022
New study pinpoints twin triggers of Triassic era extinction event
Curtin-led research has revealed an increase in levels of both acid and hydrogen sulfide in the ocean was the double whammy that wiped out marine life during a mass extinction event 201 million years ago.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 05.01.2022
A crab's'eye view of the ancient world
A crab’s’eye view of the ancient world
Their legs may get more attention, but a new study says a crab's eyes have much to offer, too - at least scientifically.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.12.2021
An ancient relative of Velociraptor is unearthed in Great Britain
An ancient relative of Velociraptor is unearthed in Great Britain
A new bird-like dinosaur has been found by paleontologists combing through fossils found on the Isle of Wight.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 15.12.2021
Reconstruction of a Cretaceous fossil water plant found in Catalonia using its plant organs
Reconstruction of a Cretaceous fossil water plant found in Catalonia using its plant organs
Palaeonitella trifurcate is the name of a new fossil species of a freshwater plant from the Lower Cretaceous found and reconstructed by a team of geologists of the University of Barcelona. The reconstruction of the plant, dating from between 125 and 120 million years ago, has been conducted using the plant organs found separately in a stratum of limestone from the Natural Park of Garraf, in Olivella (Barcelona).

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 07.12.2021
Fleshing out the bones of Quetzalcoatlus, Earth’s largest flier ever
An artist's rendition of Quetzalcoatlus northropi, a type of pterosaur and the largest flying animal that ever lived on Earth.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 30.11.2021
Dinosaurs and amber: a site in Teruel opens a unique window to the Cretaceous world from 110 million years ago
Dinosaurs and amber: a site in Teruel opens a unique window to the Cretaceous world from 110 million years ago
New findings of amber in the site of Arińo in Teruel have enabled the reconstruction of a swampy paleoenvironment with a rich coastal resin forest from 110 million years ago, from the era of dinosaurs. This place featured conifers and understories of gymnosperms and ferns, and flower plants, where insects, turtles, crocodiles, mammals and dinosaurs such as the species Proa valdearinnoensis and E uropelta carbonensis lived.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 29.11.2021
Extinct swordfish-shaped marine reptile discovered
Extinct swordfish-shaped marine reptile discovered
A new 130-million-year-old marine reptile fossil sheds light on the evolution of hypercarnivory of these last-surviving ichthyosaurs A team of international researchers from Canada, Colombia, and Germany has discovered a new marine reptile.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 22.11.2021
California researchers, with assist from U-M, recover mammoth tusk during deep-sea expedition
California researchers, with assist from U-M, recover mammoth tusk during deep-sea expedition
The ocean's dark depths hold many secrets. For more than three decades, the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute has been exploring the deep waters off the coast of central California.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 09.11.2021
Fossil elephant cranium reveals key adaptations that enabled its species to thrive as grasslands spread across eastern Africa
Fossil elephant cranium reveals key adaptations that enabled its species to thrive as grasslands spread across eastern Africa
A remarkably well-preserved fossil elephant cranium from Kenya is helping scientists understand how its species became the dominant elephant in eastern Africa several million years ago, a time when a

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 14.10.2021
Mammals on the menu: Snake dietary diversity exploded after mass extinction 66 million years ago
Mammals on the menu: Snake dietary diversity exploded after mass extinction 66 million years ago
Modern snakes evolved from ancestors that lived side by side with the dinosaurs and that likely fed mainly on insects and lizards.

Paleontology - Environment - 04.10.2021
New 'lost relative' of Triceratops found in New Mexico
New ’lost relative’ of Triceratops found in New Mexico
The skeleton fragments of a new horned dinosaur, Sierraceratops turneri, have been discovered in North America.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.09.2021
Four dinosaurs in Montana: Fieldwork pieces together life at the end of 'Dinosaur Era'
Four dinosaurs in Montana: Fieldwork pieces together life at the end of ’Dinosaur Era’
UW, Burke researchers discover four dinosaurs in Montana: Fieldwork pieces together life at the end of 'Dinosaur Era' A team of paleontologists from the University of Washington and its Burke Museum of Natural History and Culture excavated four dinosaurs in northeastern Montana this summer.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 10.08.2021
'fearsome dragon' that soared over outback Queensland
’fearsome dragon’ that soared over outback Queensland
Australia's largest flying reptile has been uncovered, a pterosaur with an estimated seven-metre wingspan that soared like a dragon above the ancient, vast inland sea once covering much of outback Queensland.

Environment - Paleontology - 22.07.2021
Huge Jurassic seabed uncovered in Cotswolds quarry
Huge Jurassic seabed uncovered in Cotswolds quarry
One of the largest and most important finds of exquisitely preserved Jurassic echinoderms - spiny-skinned marine animals such as starfish and sea urchins - has been uncovered by a University of Birmingham Research Associate.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 23.06.2021
The origins of farming insects: ambrosia fungi cultivated by beetles for more than 100 million years
The origins of farming insects: ambrosia fungi cultivated by beetles for more than 100 million years
A beetle bores a tree trunk to build a gallery in the wood in order to protect its lay. As it digs the tunnel, it spreads ambrosia fungal spores that will feed the larvae. When these bore another tree, the adult beetles will be the transmission vectors of the fungal spores in another habitat. This mutualism among insects and ambrosia fungi could be more than 100 years old -more than what was thought to date- according to an article published in the journal Biological Reviews .

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 02.06.2021
Young T. rexes were deadly despite bite force one-sixth that of adults
Jack Tseng loves bone-crunching animals - hyenas are his favorite - so when paleontologist Joseph Peterson discovered fossilized dinosaur bones that had teeth marks from a juvenile Tyrannosaurus rex ,

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.05.2021
Pandemic-era paleontology: A wayward skull, at-home fossil analyses and a first for Antarctic amphibians
Pandemic-era paleontology: A wayward skull, at-home fossil analyses and a first for Antarctic amphibians
Paleontologists had to adjust to stay safe during the COVID-19 pandemic. Many had to postpone fossil excavations, temporarily close museums and teach the next generation of fossil hunters virtually instead of in person.

Paleontology - Environment - 04.05.2021
Biogeographical affinity in Cretaceous flora from two islands of the old Tethys Ocean
Biogeographical affinity in Cretaceous flora from two islands of the old Tethys Ocean
A study published in Cretaceous Research expands the paleontological richness of continental fossils of the Lower Cretaceous with the discovery of a new water plant (charophytes), the species Mesochara dobrogeica . The study also identifies a new variety of carophytes from the Clavator genus (in particular, Clavator ampullaceus var.

Paleontology - 21.04.2021
Tarantula’s Ubiquity Traced Back to the Cretaceous
Carnegie Mellon University April 21, 2021 Tarantulas are among the most notorious spiders, due in part to their size and vibrant colors. With their prevalence throughout the world, it may be surprising to learn that tarantulas are actually homebodies. Females and their young rarely leave their burrows and only mature males will wander to seek out a mate.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 15.04.2021
How many T. rexes were there? Billions
Over approximately 2.5 million years, North America likely hosted 2.5 billion Tyrannosaurus rexes, a minuscule proportion of which have been dug up and studied by paleontologists, according to a UC Berkeley study.

Paleontology - 09.03.2021
Younger Tyrannosaurus Rex bites were less ferocious than their adult counterparts
Younger Tyrannosaurus Rex bites were less ferocious than their adult counterparts
By closely examining the jaw mechanics of juvenile and adult tyrannosaurids, some of the fiercest dinosaurs to inhabit earth, scientists led by the University of Bristol have uncovered differences in how they bit into their prey.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 24.02.2021
Earliest primate fossils
Earliest primate fossils
A new study published Feb. 24 in the journal Royal Society Open Science documents the earliest-known fossil evidence of primates.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 24.02.2021
Our earliest primate ancestors rapidly spread after dinosaur extinction
Our earliest primate ancestors rapidly spread after dinosaur extinction
The small, furry ancestors of all primates - a group that includes humans and other apes - were already taking to the trees a mere 100,000 years after the mass extinction that wiped out the dinosaurs

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 21.12.2020
Study resolves the position of fleas on the tree of life
A study of more than 1,400 protein-coding genes of fleas has resolved one of the longest standing mysteries in the evolution of insects, reordering their placement in the tree of life and pinpointing who their closest relatives are. The University of Bristol study, published in the journal Palaeoentomology , drew on the largest insect molecular dataset available.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 01.12.2020
William Clemens, expert on fossil mammals, dies at 88
Bill Clemens had been excavating fossils in eastern Montana's Hell Creek Formation for more than 10 years, focusing primarily on the small mammals that scurried around the feet of dinosaurs and other

Paleontology - Environment - 27.10.2020
Antarctica yields oldest fossils of giant birds with 21-foot wingspans
An artist's depiction of ancient albatrosses harassing a pelagornithid - with its fearsome toothed beak - as penguins frolic in the oceans around Antarctica 50 million years ago.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 22.10.2020
Bat-winged dinosaurs that could glide
Despite having bat-like wings, two small dinosaurs, Yi and Ambopteryx, struggled to fly, only managing to glide clumsily between the trees where they lived, according to a new study led by an international team of researchers, including McGill University Professor Hans Larsson. Unable to compete with other tree-dwelling dinosaurs and early birds, they went extinct after just a few million years.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 16.10.2020
World’s greatest mass extinction triggered switch to warm-bloodedness
The origin of endothermy in synapsids, including the ancestors of mammals. The diagram shows the evolution of main groups through the Triassic, and the scale from blue to red is a measure of the degree of warm-bloodedness reconstructed based on different indicators of bone structure and anatomy.