news

« BACK

Electroengineering



Results 581 - 600 of 613.
« Previous 1 ... 26 27 28 29 30 ... 31 Next »


Electroengineering - Physics - 25.07.2011
A “quantum leap” can make graphene devices even faster
A “quantum leap” can make graphene devices even faster
Researchers have taken another step forward towards the understanding of wonder material graphene. Research institutes and universities around the world are already looking at ways to build devices such as touch-screen phones, ultrafast transistors and photodetectors. Now the new findings promise to accelerate that research, and potentially open up countless more electronic opportunities.

Physics - Electroengineering - 22.07.2011
Caltech-Led Astronomers Discover the Largest and Most Distant Reservoir of Water Yet
Caltech-Led Astronomers Discover the Largest and Most Distant Reservoir of Water Yet
PASADENA, Calif.—Water really is everywhere. Two teams of astronomers, each led by scientists at the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), have discovered the largest and farthest reservoir of water ever detected in the universe. Looking from a distance of 30 billion trillion miles away into a quasar—one of the brightest and most violent objects in the cosmos—the researchers have found a mass of water vapor that's at least 140 trillion times that of all the water in the world's oceans combined, and 100,000 times more massive than the sun.

Health - Electroengineering - 13.07.2011
College of Medicine receives additional funding from Gates Foundation
Hershey, Pa. Penn State College of Medicine announced Wednesday (July 13) that it will receive additional funding through Grand Challenges Explorations, an initiative created by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation that enables researchers worldwide to test unorthodox ideas that address persistent health and development challenges.

Electroengineering - 10.07.2011
While you re up, print me a solar cell
New MIT-developed materials make it possible to produce photovoltaic cells on paper or fabric, nearly as simply as printing a document. The sheet of paper looks like any other document that might have just come spitting out of an office printer, with an array of colored rectangles printed over much of its surface.

Electroengineering - 05.07.2011
With a simple coating, nanowires show a dramatic increase in efficiency and sensitivity
With a simple coating, nanowires show a dramatic increase in efficiency and sensitivity
You are here: Home - News & Events - Press Releases - With a simple coating, nanowires show a dramatic increase in efficiency and sensitivity Development holds promise for photodetectors and energy harvesting applications like solar cells By applying a coating to individual silicon nanowires, researchers at Harvard and Berkeley have significantly improved the materials? efficiency and sensitivity.

Electroengineering - 28.06.2011
Silver pen has the write stuff for flexible electronics
Silver pen has the write stuff for flexible electronics
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. The pen may have bested the sword long ago, but now it's challenging wires and soldering irons. University of Illinois engineers have developed a silver-inked rollerball pen capable of writing electrical circuits and interconnects on paper, wood and other surfaces. The pen is writing whole new chapters in low-cost, flexible and disposable electronics.

Electroengineering - Physics - 27.06.2011
New Material Promises Faster Electronics
[ Florian Aigner The novel material graphene makes faster electronics possible. Scientists at the Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Information Technology at the Vienna University of Technology (TU Vienna) developed light-detectors made of graphene and analyzed their astonishing properties. High hopes are pinned on this new material: Graphene, a honeycomb-like carbon structure, made of only one layer of atoms, exhibits remarkable properties.

Electroengineering - 14.06.2011
Miniaturized Power Modules for Aircraft Bodies
Sensor networks are supposed to pervade the body of airplanes in the future ' much like a nervous system. Thanks to a joint research project of EADS Deutschland GmbH (Germany) and the Vienna University of Technology, the single sensor elements do not require any external power supply. Aircraft maintenance can be time consuming and expensive.

Chemistry - Electroengineering - 13.06.2011
How to choose a catalyst
CAMBRIDGE, Mass. MIT researchers have found a new way to predict which materials will perform best as catalysts for oxygen reduction, a core process in metal air batteries and fuel cells, opening up the possibility of faster and more effective development of new high-efficiency, low-cost energy-storage technologies.

Physics - Electroengineering - 02.06.2011
Long live the qubit!
The power of quantum computers depends on keeping them in a fragile quantum-mechanical state - which researchers have found a new way to extend. A quantum computer is a device - still largely theoretical - that could perform some types of calculations much more rapidly than classical computers. While a bit in a classical computer can represent either 0 or 1, a quantum bit, or qubit, can be in 'superposition,' representing 0 and 1 at the same time.

Physics - Electroengineering - 30.05.2011
Energy from the stars
Energy from the stars
The international ITER project is setting out to store the energy of stars in a reactor. To meet this challenge, scientists must be able to measure the properties of matter in fusion. Researchers have just successfully tested some sensors that are necessary for the ITER prototype. The scientists' ambition is to keep matter with a temperature of several million degrees contained here on Earth.

Electroengineering - Environment - 25.05.2011
Record efficiency for solar cells
Record efficiency for solar cells
Scientists have further boosted the energy conversion efficiency of flexible solar cells made of copper indium gallium (di)selenide (also known as CIGS) to a new world record of 18.7% - a significant improvement overt he previous record of 17.6% achieved by the same team in June 2010.

Electroengineering - Health - 24.05.2011
Expert discovers simple method of dealing with harmful radioactive iodine
Expert discovers simple method of dealing with harmful radioactive iodine A novel way to immobilise radioactive forms of iodine using a microwave, has been discovered by an expert at the University of Sheffield. Iodine radioisotopes are produced by fission of uranium fuel in a nuclear reactor. Radioactive iodine is of concern because it is highly mobile in the environment and selective uptake by the thyroid gland can pose a significant cancer risk following long term exposure.

Physics - Electroengineering - 15.04.2011
New spin on graphene
New spin on graphene
University of Manchester scientists have found a way to make wonder material graphene magnetic, opening up a new range of opportunities for the world's thinnest material in the area of spintronics. A team led by Professor Andre Geim, a recipient of the 2010 Nobel Prize for graphene, can now show that electric current – a flow of electrons – can magnetise graphene.

Physics - Electroengineering - 14.04.2011
New spin on graphene
Scientists including an MIT physics professor have found a way to make wonder material graphene magnetic, opening up a new range of opportunities for the world's thinnest material in the area of spintronics. The collaboration, led by the University of Manchester, showed that electric current - a flow of electrons - can magnetize graphene.

Electroengineering - Physics - 04.04.2011
Self-cooling observed in graphene electronics
Self-cooling observed in graphene electronics
CHAMPAIGN, Ill. With the first observation of thermoelectric effects at graphene contacts, University of Illinois researchers found that graphene transistors have a nanoscale cooling effect that reduces their temperature. Led by mechanical science and engineering professor William King and electrical and computer engineering professor Eric Pop, the team will publish its findings in the April 3 advance online edition of.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 31.03.2011
Fruit fly antennae are tuned in
Fruit fly antennae are tuned in
Links: UCL Ear Institute Research paper in Current Biology The antennal ears of different fruit fly species are actively tuned to high-frequency components of their respective mating songs, according to new research led by UCL scientists. During courtship, male fruit flies serenade females with a 'love song' produced by quiet, close-range wing vibrations.

Electroengineering - Physics - 30.01.2011
A material to revolutionize electronics
A material to revolutionize electronics
Smaller and more energy-efficient electronic chips could be made using molybdenite. A recent study shows that this material has distinct advantages over traditional silicon or graphene for use in electronics applications.

Physics - Electroengineering - 13.12.2010
In the future: processing and memory on a single chip
In the future: processing and memory on a single chip
Researchers have shown that a magnetically polarised current can be manipulated by electric fields. This important discovery opens up the prospect of simultaneously processing and storing data on electrons held in the molecular structure of computer chips - combining computer memory and processing power on the same chip.

Computer Science - Electroengineering - 15.11.2010
‘Space-time cloak’ to conceal events revealed in new study
‘Space-time cloak’ to conceal events revealed in new study
'Space-time cloak' to conceal events revealed in new study Cloak allows objects to move undetected, according to a paper in the Journal of Optics - News release Scientists have developed a recipe for manipulating the speed of light as it passes over an object, making it theoretically possible to 'cloak' the object's movement so that an observer doesn't notice, according to a paper in the Journal of Optics .
« Previous 1 ... 26 27 28 29 30 ... 31 Next »