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Environment - History / Archeology - 25.01.2023
8 billion and counting: will the Earth survive?
The good news is that global population growth has slowed and won't in itself cause climate change, says UdeM demographics professor Alain Gagnon. CONTENU - Credit: Photo de courtoisie In November, the United Nations announced that the Earth is now home to eight billion people, or seven billion more than there were just 200 years ago.

History / Archeology - Politics - 17.01.2023
A year after the invasion in Ukraine: history as a weapon
marks the anniversary of Russia's invasion of Ukraine. Historians Harm Kaal and Jelle van Lottum are presenting a 180-page edition of the Journal of Applied History devoted in its entirety to the Russio-Ukrainian war and how history is being used as a weapon in this conflict.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 16.01.2023
Marriage in Minoan Crete
Marriage in Minoan Crete
New archaeogenetic data allow exciting insights into the social order of the Aegean Bronze Age An international team of researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig, Germany, achieves completely new insights into Bronze Age marriage rules and family structures in Greece.

Earth Sciences - History / Archeology - 12.01.2023
Alps: New findings about earthquake history
A team of geologists from the University of Innsbruck examined the sediments of Carinthian lakes for traces of past earthquakes. The results show that the earthquake of 1348 caused the strongest shaking in the Carinthian region since the end of the last cold period. Earthquakes with potential building damage are rare there, but can occur in temporal clusters .

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 12.01.2023
Genetic data from the Altai 7,500 years ago indicate high mobility of ancient hunter-gatherers
Genetic data from the Altai 7,500 years ago indicate high mobility of ancient hunter-gatherers
An international team lead by researchers from the University of Tübingen, Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment in Tübingen and Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology in Leipzig have identified a previously unknown hunter-gatherer population in the Altai some 7,500 years ago which illustrates the high mobility between populations in Siberia and elsewhere in North Asia.

History / Archeology - 05.01.2023
Ice Age markings show evidence of early writing dating back 20,000 years
Ice Age markings show evidence of early writing dating back 20,000 years
Ice Age drawings and markings found in caves show that prehistoric hunter-gathers used a form of early writing to communicate essential survival information at least 14,000 years earlier than previously thought, finds a study involving a UCL researcher. Archaeologists already knew that the markings - sequences of lines, dots and other shapes - conveyed information but did not know their meaning.

History / Archeology - Paleontology - 02.01.2023
The oldest bearded vulture nest in the Iberian Peninsula
The oldest bearded vulture nest in the Iberian Peninsula
Coprolites, or fossil faeces from around 30,000 years ago, have been used to identify the presence of bearded vultures ( Gypaetus barbatus ) at the Palaeolithic site of Lagar Velho (Portugal). A comparison of the coprolites found in the excavations with the faeces of present-day lammergeyers has confirmed the presence of these animals in the past.

History / Archeology - 23.12.2022
Humans have been using bear skins for at least 300,000 years
Humans have been using bear skins for at least 300,000 years
Humans have been using bear skins to protect themselves from cold weather for at least 300,000 years. This is suggested by cut marks on the metatarsal and phalanx of a cave bear discovered at the Lower Paleolithic site of Schöningen in Lower Saxony, Germany. This makes it one of the oldest examples of this type in the world.

History / Archeology - Agronomy / Food Science - 22.12.2022
The Neolithic populations that came to the peninsula by sea and lived near it barely consumed fish
The Neolithic populations that came to the peninsula by sea and lived near it barely consumed fish
Domingo Carlos Salazar, CIDEGENT researcher at the University of Valencia (UV), has led a study that dates the occupation of the Neolithic site of Cova Bonica, located near the coast and the Llobregat River Delta. The results, published in the Frontiers magazine, confirm the important weight of an agricultural-livestock economy 7,400 years ago now, with a diet based on domesticated species of cereals and animals, and without the presence of fish.

History / Archeology - Campus - 21.12.2022
Gender equality is good for economic growth
Over 500 years, the economy developed better in parts of Europe where women married in their 20s instead of their teens, according to a study by economic historians Alexandra de Pleijt from Wa-geningen University in the Netherlands and Jörg Baten from the University of. Their study has been published in the journal World Development .

History / Archeology - 20.12.2022
Looking for a faster way to learn a language? Try historical linguistics
In recent years, language-learning apps, websites, and podcasts have exploded in popularity, promising fun and faster ways to make us fluent. But a new study conducted by UBC English James Stratton finds that one of the best ways of fast-tracking your language acquisition may be to learn a bit of language history - at least when it comes to learning a historically related language.

History / Archeology - 15.12.2022
Tiny flakes tell a story of tool use 300,000 years ago
Tiny flakes tell a story of tool use 300,000 years ago
When prehistoric people re-sharpened cutting tools 300,000 years ago, they dropped tiny chips of flint - which today yield evidence of how wood was processed by early humans. The small flint flakes were discovered at the Lower Paleolithic site of Schöningen, Lower Saxony. Now, a multidisciplinary team led by the University of Tübingen and the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment (SHEP) in Tübingen has analyzed this very old material for the information it can provide.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 09.12.2022
Medieval and contemporary Ashkenazi Jews are genetically virtually identical, and that's surprising
Medieval and contemporary Ashkenazi Jews are genetically virtually identical, and that’s surprising
Unique genetic research shows that the Ashkenazi Jewish community has been a virtually closed group since the 14th century. The international and interdisciplinary Genetic Legacies project examined DNA from the teeth of dozens of medieval and contemporary members of the community from the German city of Erfurt.

Environment - History / Archeology - 08.12.2022
Climate whiplash increased wildfires on California's west coast about 8,000 years ago
Climate whiplash increased wildfires on California's west coast about 8,000 years ago
Researchers use speleothems as a source of information on historic climate / Hydroclimate volatility and increase in natural forest fire events are linked Scientists are trying to uncover and analyze evidence from the past in their search for a better assessment of future climate trends. In a joint international research project, researchers have been studying the effects of the sudden decrease in global temperatures that occurred about 8,200 years ago, the so-called 8.2-kiloyear event, with the help of mineral deposits present in White Moon Cave in Northern California.

History / Archeology - 30.11.2022
Gold from Troia, Poliochni and Ur had the same origin
The gold in objects from Troia, Poliochni - a settlement on the island of Lemnos, located about 60 kilometers off the coast of Troia - and Mesopotamian Ur has the same geographical origin and was traded over long distances. This is the conclusion reached by an international team of researchers who used an innovative mobile laser method to analyze samples of famous Early Bronze Age jewelry from Troia and Poliochni for the first time.

History / Archeology - Architecture - 23.11.2022
Archaeology of the Notre-Dame-et-Saint-Castor cathedral in Nîmes (Gard)
Archaeology of the Notre-Dame-et-Saint-Castor cathedral in Nîmes (Gard)
Since the beginning of 2022, a study of the archaeology of the building led by the Inrap is engaged on the bell tower and the western facade of the cathedral of Nîmes. It is an exceptional opportunity to deepen our knowledge of this emblematic building of the city of Nîmes, by studying closely its elevations.

Life Sciences - History / Archeology - 21.11.2022
Hominins were cooking fish already in the early Paleolithic period about 780,000 years ago
Hominins were cooking fish already in the early Paleolithic period about 780,000 years ago
Ancient fish teeth discovered at the archaeological site of Gesher Benot Ya'aqov in Israel provide earliest evidence of our prehistoric ancestors deliberately cooking foodstuff Nutrition and the ability to prepare foodstuffs helped facilitate the evolution of the human species. Considered particularly relevant to the development of the genus Homo in this context are the processes of cooking.

History / Archeology - Environment - 18.11.2022
Let them eat stew: University of Glasgow research sheds new light on foodways in the first cities
Let them eat stew: University of Glasgow research sheds new light on foodways in the first cities
The world's first urban state societies developed in Mesopotamia, modern-day Iraq, some 5500 years ago. No other artefact type is more symbolic of this development than the so-called Beveled Rim Bowl (BRB), the first mass produced ceramic bowl. BRB function and what food(s) these bowls contained has been the subject of debate for over a century.

History / Archeology - Architecture - 10.11.2022
Previously unknown monumental temple discovered near the Tempio Grande in Vulci
Previously unknown monumental temple discovered near the Tempio Grande in Vulci
Archeologists from the universities of Freiburg and Mainz identify one of the largest known sacred buildings of the Etruscans Freiburg, Nov 10, 2022 An interdisciplinary team headed by archeologists Dr. Mariachiara Franceschini of the University of Freiburg and Paul P. Pasieka of the University of Mainz has discovered a previously unknown Etruscan temple in the ancient city of Vulci, which lies in the Italian region of Latium.

History / Archeology - 10.11.2022
Comics more and more able to address complex questions around perpetration and complicity
14:35 Publication This special issue of the 'Journal of Perpetrator Research' focusses on the way perpetrators are portrayed in comics and graphic novels and how this is changing.
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