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Pedagogy - Psychology - 31.03.2021
More support needed for two children in every class with hidden language disorder
Research from Bath psychologists suggests schools could introduce quieter alternatives to playtime to help children with Developmental Language Disorder. Last updated on Wednesday 31 March 2021 Children with a common but regularly undiagnosed disorder affecting their language and communication are likely to be finding the transition back to school post-lockdown harder than most, according to a team of psychologists.

Pedagogy - 26.03.2021
Global evidence for how EdTech can support pupils with disabilities is ’thinly spread’, report finds
An "astonishing" deficit of data about how the global boom in educational technology could help pupils with disabilities in low and middle-income countries has been highlighted in a new report.

Pedagogy - 26.03.2021
Global evidence for how EdTech can support pupils with disabilities is ’thinly spread’
An 'astonishing' deficit of data about how the global boom in educational technology could help pupils with disabilities in low and middle-income countries has been highlighted in a. Despite widespread optimism that educational technology, or 'EdTech', can help to level the playing field for young people with disabilities, the study found a significant shortage of evidence about which innovations are best-positioned to help which children, and why; specifically in low-income contexts.

Pedagogy - 23.03.2021
Babies prefer baby talk, whether they’re learning one language or two
It can be hard to resist lapsing into an exaggerated, singsong tone when you talk to a cute baby. And that's with good reason. Babies will pay more attention to baby talk than regular speech, regardless of which languages they're used to hearing, according to a study by UCLA's Language Acquisition Lab and 16 other labs around the globe.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 22.03.2021
The gender equalization process in Spain led to unexpected effects on the health of new-borns
The gender equalization process in Spain led to unexpected effects on the health of new-borns, according to research A study involving researchers from Pompeu Fabra, Barcelona, Mannheim and Carlos III of Madrid universities analyses the effect of increased access by women to education and financial opportunities caused to their fertility and the health of new-borns.

Pedagogy - 10.03.2021
Being born small doesn’t tend to disadvantage IVF babies’ cognitive development
Children conceived through medically assisted reproduction who are born small do just as well in cognitive tests during childhood and adolescence as naturally conceived children who are born a normal weight, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. The new research, published today in the International Journal of Epidemiology, is one of the first studies to examine the links between medically assisted reproduction (MAR) - including techniques such as IVF treatment, artificial insemination and ovulation induction - birth weight and cognitive development.

Pedagogy - 09.03.2021
Schools are on a good track amidst the coronavirus crisis
Schools are on a good track amidst the coronavirus crisis
In the study "Continuity and Change of Schools in Times of Crisis" (Kontinuität und Wandel der Schule in Krisenzeiten - KWiK), school principals were asked how they are mastering the challenges posed by the coronavirus pandemic. Initial results from the study paint a positive picture but reveal the need for some catching up as well.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 02.03.2021
Parents depressed by pandemic had negative impact on kids’ education, well-being
Parent depression and stress early in the pandemic negatively contributed to young children's home education and anxiety, a University of Michigan study suggests. The stress could still be present today for some parents as their kids transition back to school while COVID-19 remains a danger. Continued support for children and parents will be needed, researchers said.

Innovation - Pedagogy - 26.02.2021
A Kazakh experiment in handwriting
A Kazakh experiment in handwriting
New EPFL research on whether handwriting skills transfer when a child writes in two different alphabetic scripts may pave the way for cross-lingual digital tools for the detection of handwriting difficulties. Despite the increasing digitization of education and the use of use of tablets and laptops in schools, handwriting has maintained its central position in learning as the basis of many core educational activities such as taking notes, composing stories and self-expression.

Health - Pedagogy - 10.02.2021
Wider lockdown key to preventing Covid-19 surge if schools reopen
Wider restrictions must remain in place if schools reopen in March in order to keep the epidemic's R number below 1 in the UK, a new UCL-led modelling study suggests. The pre-print study, published on the site medRxiv, suggested that reopening schools to all pupils in some form on March 8 may lead to an increase in cases but that, if a broader lockdown remained, it was unlikely to cause the R rate to go above 1 and lead to the epidemic growing again.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 03.02.2021
Teaching pupils empathy measurably improves their creative abilities
Teaching pupils empathy measurably improves their creative abilities
Teaching children in a way that encourages them to empathise with others measurably improves their creativity, and could potentially lead to several other beneficial learning outcomes, new research suggests. We clearly awakened something in these pupils by encouraging them to think about the thoughts and feelings of others Helen Demetriou The findings are from a year-long University of Cambridge study with Design and Technology (D&T) year 9 pupils (ages 13 to 14) at two inner London schools.

Pedagogy - 01.02.2021
Parental control apps behaving badly
Parental control apps behaving badly
Researchers from EPFL and Spain's IMDEA Software Institute and IMDEA Networks Institute , have found that many parental control applications collect and share data without consent, and fail to comply with regulatory requirements.

Pedagogy - 19.01.2021
I apologise for my behaviour: when shyness becomes a problem
I apologise for my behaviour: when shyness becomes a problem
Extreme shyness likely emerges in very early childhood. Developmental psychologist Milica Nikolic is conducting research to determine how parents can prevent their children from becoming overly shy in later life. Extreme shyness can have a negative impact on both mental and physical health. Almost everyone has experienced it at one time or another: all eyes are on us - for example during a presentation at work - and we suddenly feel shy.

Pedagogy - 12.01.2021
Family court decisions distorted by misuse of key research, say experts
Family courts are misunderstanding and misusing research around how children form close relationships with their caregivers, say an international group of experts. The decisions reached by family courts can have a major impact on a child's life, but as we've seen, these decisions may be based on incorrect understanding and assumptions Robbie Duschinsky Seventy experts from across the globe argue that widespread misunderstandings around attachment research have hampered its accurate implementation, with potentially negative consequences for decisions in family courts.

Pedagogy - 08.12.2020
Pupils can learn more effectively through stories than activities
Storytelling is the most effective way of teaching school children about evolution, say researchers at the Milner Centre for Evolution. Last updated on Tuesday 8 December 2020 A randomised controlled trial found that children learn about evolution more effectively when engaged through stories read by the teacher, than through doing tasks to demonstrate the same concept.

Campus - Pedagogy - 02.12.2020
Parents shouldn’t worry about their baby’s inconsistent sleep patterns
New parents often expect their baby to start sleeping through the night around the time they reach six months of age. But according to a new study led by Professor Marie-Hélène Pennestri, parents should view sleep consolidation as a process, instead of a milestone to be achieved at a specific age. Tracking 44 infants over a period of two weeks, she found that sleeping patterns vary greatly - not only for different babies, but also night to night for the same baby.

Pedagogy - Mathematics - 27.11.2020
Storybooks could help children’s maths
Tutoring programmes and storybooks can help improve children's attainment in maths, according to a new evidence review led by UCL researchers. The evidence review, published today by the Education Endowment Foundation (EEF) and written by a team from the UCL Institute of Education, the University of Brighton, Loughborough University and Ulster University, synthesises the best international evidence about the teaching and learning mathematics for children in Early Years and Key Stage 1 (between the ages of 3 and 7).

Health - Pedagogy - 10.11.2020
Study completes COVID-19 antibody testing
Children of the 90s, a health study based at the University of Bristol, has today [10 November] published results from a study testing almost 5,000 participants for COVID-19 antibodies. The results found 4.3 per cent reported a positive result, of which a quarter were asymptomatic and did not report any symptoms in previous questionnaires.

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 06.10.2020
Children use make-believe aggression and violence to manage bad-tempered peers
Children are more likely to introduce violent themes into their pretend play, such as imaginary fighting or killing, if they are with playmates whom peers consider bad-tempered, new research suggests. For some children, this could actually be a way of developing their social and emotional skills Zhen Rao Academics from the University of Cambridge believe that the tendency for children to introduce aggressive themes in these situations - which seems to happen whether or not they are personally easy to anger - may be because they are 'rehearsing' strategies to cope with hot-headed friends.

Pedagogy - 02.10.2020
Cheating birds mimic host nestlings to deceive foster parents
The common cuckoo is known for its deceitful nesting behaviour - by laying eggs in the nests of other bird species, it fools host parents into rearing cuckoo chicks alongside their own. While cuckoos mimic their host's eggs, new research has revealed that a group of parasitic finch species in Africa have evolved to mimic their host's chicks - and with astonishing accuracy.