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Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 14.06.2018
'Teachers are brain engineers': UW study shows how intensive instruction changes brain circuitry in struggling readers
’Teachers are brain engineers’: UW study shows how intensive instruction changes brain circuitry in struggling readers
The early years are when the brain develops the most, forming neural connections that pave the way for how a child - and the eventual adult - will express feelings, embark on a task, and learn new skills and concepts. Scientists have even theorized that the anatomical structure of neural connections forms the basis for how children identify letters and recognize words.

Continuing Education - Pedagogy - 13.06.2018
Where boys and girls do better in math, English
A review of test scores from 10,000 school district finds that gender gaps in math and English vary with community wealth and racial diversity. When Stanford Professor Sean Reardon and his research team set out to take an unprecedented look at how elementary school girls and boys compare in academic achievement, they expected to find similar stereotype-driven patterns across all 10,000 U.S. school districts: boys consistently outperforming girls in math and girls steadily surpassing boys in reading and writing by a wide margin.

Pedagogy - Health - 12.06.2018
Mother's attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child's development
Mother’s attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child’s development
Mothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a study carried out at the University of Cambridge. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop. Although we found a relationship between a mother's attitude towards her baby during pregnancy and her later interactions, this link was only modest.

Pedagogy - Economics / Business - 05.06.2018
Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare
Immigrant and disadvantaged children benefit most from early childcare
Attending universal childcare from age three significantly improves the school readiness of children from immigrant and disadvantaged family backgrounds, a new UCL study has found.  However, the research by the Centre for Research and Analysis of Migration (CReAM), shows the same universal childcare, only has a modest impact on the school readiness of children from advantaged backgrounds.  The study, which looked at German school entry exam data, also shows that immigrant children and children from disadvantaged backgrounds are less likely to attend childcare at age three.

Religions - Pedagogy - 17.04.2018
Religiously engaged adolescents demonstrate habits that help them get better grades
Study suggests that being religious helps adolescents get better grades because they are rewarded for being conscientious and cooperative. Adolescents who practice religion on a regular basis do better in school than those who are religiously disengaged, according to new research from Stanford Graduate School of Education (GSE).

Health - Pedagogy - 05.04.2018
Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthood
Three-quarters of COPD cases are linked to childhood risk factors that are exacerbated in adulthood
Three-quarters of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) cases have their origins in poor lung function pathways beginning in childhood. These pathways are associated with exposures in childhood, and amplified by factors in adulthood, according to a cohort study published in The Lancet Respiratory Medicine journal.

Pedagogy - 28.03.2018
Thousands of children of EU parents at risk of falling into the cracks of Brexit - research
Some memories containing inaccurate information can be beneficial to dementia sufferers because it enables them to retain key information researchers say. The University of Birmingham researchers suggest that distorted memories play a role in preserving knowledge for someone with dementia and that the role they play should be evaluated.

Pedagogy - 23.03.2018
Birmingham and Nankai launch Institute to tackle global green challenges
New research has found no evidence Omega-3 fish oil supplements help aid or improve the reading ability or memory function of underperforming school-children. These findings are in contradiction to an earlier study run by the same team using the same supplement. In the second high quality trial of its kind, published in PLOS-ONE , the researchers found an entirely different result to an earlier study carried out in 2012 , where omega-3 supplements were found to have a beneficial effect on the reading ability and working memory of school children with learning needs such as ADHD.

Pedagogy - Psychology - 12.03.2018
Multi-million pound award aims to create new breakthrough therapies
Researchers have made a major breakthrough in the assessment of language development among bilingual families and in the identification of those children who require extra support to improve their language skills. During a three-year study involving nine UK universities including the University of Birmingham, academics interviewed almost 400 families with two-year-old children learning English and another of 13 common additional languages.

Life Sciences - Pedagogy - 13.02.2018
Back-and-forth exchanges boost children's brain response to language
Back-and-forth exchanges boost children’s brain response to language
A landmark 1995 study found that children from higher-income families hear about 30 million more words during their first three years of life than children from lower-income families. This "30-million-word gap" correlates with significant differences in tests of vocabulary, language development, and reading comprehension.

Pedagogy - 27.11.2017
Deaths during childbirth reduce by half, report reveals
The extent of grandparents providing childcare in the UK is much higher than previously thought and is a factor in assisting mums, who had taken time out from work to have children, to get back into the workplace, according to new research carried out at the University of Birmingham. The study, published in the Journal of Social Policy, found that grandparents were the first named source of after school and weekend care for 36% of school entry year children for lone parents and 32% for partnered mothers.

Health - Pedagogy - 14.11.2017
Grandparent behaviour appears to have a negative impact on children’s long-term cancer risks
The behaviour of grandparents may inadvertently be having a negative impact on the health of their grandchildren, according to a new study.‌‌ Researchers from the MRC/CSO Social and Public Health Sciences Unit, University of Glasgow, published the results of the review - which looked at 56 studies with data from 18 countries, concerning the care provided by grandparents who are not the primary carer of their grandchildren - today in the journal PLOS ONE.

Health - Pedagogy - 31.10.2017
Clamping the umbilical cord later saves preterm babies’ lives
Wait a minute! Thousands of preterm babies could be saved by waiting 60 seconds before clamping the umbilical cord after birth instead of clamping it immediately University of Sydney research finds.  Thousands of preterm babies could be saved by waiting 60 seconds before clamping the umbilical cord after birth instead of clamping it immediately - according to two international studies coordinated by the University of Sydney's National Health and Medical Research Council Clinical Trials Centre.

Pedagogy - 19.09.2017
Belief in one’s abilities early in life predicts math, reading achievement later on
ANN ARBOR-When kids believe they can succeed in math and reading, it increases their chances later to achieve high test scores in those same subjects, a new study found. Researchers at the University of Michigan, Pontificia Universidad Católica de Chile and Independent Scholar used two U.S. data sets-with one being a nationally represented study-and one U.K. data set to measure self-concept and standardized assessments of early and later academic achievement.

Sport - Pedagogy - 14.09.2017
Kids Praised for Being Smart Are More Likely to Cheat
An international team of researchers reports that when children are praised for being smart not only are they quicker to give up in the face of obstacles they are also more likely to be dishonest and cheat. Kids as young as age 3 appear to behave differently when told "You are so smart" vs "You did very well this time." The study, published in Psychological Science , is co-authored by Gail Heyman of the University of California San Diego, Kang Lee of the University of Toronto, and Lulu Chen and Li Zhao of Hangzhou Normal University in China.

Pedagogy - 06.09.2017
Schools "teaching in ’ability’ sets despite evidence this may cause harm
Schools are rejecting the chance to teach children in "mixed-ability" classes despite evidence that the alternative - pupils being put in ability sets or streams - will have a negative effect on at least some of their charges' results, according to new research from UCL. The paper - "Factors deterring schools from mixed attainment grouping practices," written by Dr Becky Taylor, UCL Institute of Education (IOE), together with academics from Queen's University, Belfast, was presented yesterday at the British Educational Research Association's (BERA) annual conference.

Pedagogy - Health - 05.09.2017
Parental lack of confidence in GPs to care for their children may be contributing to over-crowded hospital emergency departments, new research suggests
Parental lack of confidence in GPs to care for their children may be contributing to over-crowded hospital emergency departments, new research suggests. Australia's first national survey of parent confidence in GPs found fewer than half of parents were completely confident in a GP to handle most of their child's general health issues.

Pedagogy - Health - 31.08.2017
Children’s sleep quality linked to mothers’ insomnia
Children sleep more poorly if their mothers suffer from insomnia symptoms - potentially affecting their mental wellbeing and development - according to new research by the University of Warwick and the University of Basel.

Pedagogy - Media - 29.08.2017
Apps 'don't affect children's language development' if parents still read stories
Apps ‘don’t affect children’s language development’ if parents still read stories
Watching television or playing with smart phone apps does not have any effect on children's language development - providing they still spend time reading, researchers have found. A study from the University of Salford and Lancaster University, published in the Journal Of Children And Media , has found that as long as parents or carers spend time reading with young children, and this time is not reduced in place of television or touchscreen devices such as iPads, children's exposure to these media should have no effect on the size of their vocabulary.

Pedagogy - Social Sciences - 28.08.2017
Expectations for all-day schools are too high
Expectations for all-day schools are too high
Children in the German-speaking part of Switzerland who utilise extended education offerings in the first two years of primary school generally perform no better in school than other children, an SNSF-funded project has found. Overall, the research shows that all-day schools do not fulfil all the expectations people place in them.
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