Inflammatory gene provides clue to obesity risk

A gene that helps to control inflammation increases the risk of obesity and could be turned off in mice to stop weight gain, a study from The University of Queensland has found.

UQ Institute for Molecular Bioscience researcher Dr Denuja Karunakaran said she was determined to unravel the links between inflammation and obesity that went deeper than excessive eating or lack of exercise.

“We found small changes in the inflammatory gene RIPK1 in the obese people, and these variations caused an increased amount of the gene being present in their fat tissue, increasing their risk of being obese,’ Dr Karunakaran said.

“RIPK1 is essential for a healthy immune response, but it also causes hyper-inflammation when it ‘goes rogue’.

“By finding an increased amount of inflammation in obese people, we can confidently say that obesity increases inflammation.’

The researchers then looked at the effect of turning the inflammatory gene on and off in mice.

Without the gene, the mice remained at a normal weight despite eating a high-fat diet and their risk of diabetes was reduced.

The mice with a normal level of the inflammatory gene put on weight from eating the same high-fat diet.


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