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Paleontology - Life Sciences - 10.01.2022
Jurassic Giant - The Largest Marine Reptile Skeleton Ever Unearthed in Britain
Jurassic Giant - The Largest Marine Reptile Skeleton Ever Unearthed in Britain
The fossilised remains of Britain's largest ichthyosaur, colloquially known as a 'Sea Dragon', have been discovered at the Rutland Water Nature Reserve, owned and run by Anglian Water. It is the biggest and most complete skeleton of its kind found to date in the UK and is also thought to be the first ichthyosaur of its species found in the country.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 10.01.2022
Within a dinosaur's head: ankylosaur was sluggish and deaf
Within a dinosaur’s head: ankylosaur was sluggish and deaf
German and Austrian scientists took a closer look at the braincase of a dinosaur from Austria. The group examined the fossil with a micro-CT and found surprising new details: it was sluggish and deaf. The respective study got recently published in the scientific journal scientific reports. Ankylosaurs could grow up to eight meters in body length and represent a group of herbivorous dinosaurs, also called 'living fortresses': Their body was cluttered with bony plates and spikes.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 06.01.2022
Correcting the fossil record: Researchers say four-legged ’snake’ is different ancient animal
It all started with a grand claim: scientists had discovered the first known four-legged snake fossil from Brazil. The specimen, named  Tetrapodophis amplectus , was small - about the size of a pencil - with tiny limbs. It was considered a significant discovery that offered paleontologists a major clue into the transition from limbed lizards to limbless snakes.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 22.12.2021
Modern mammals originated after dinosaur extinction, confirms new study
Modern mammals originated after dinosaur extinction, confirms new study
The most detailed timeline of mammal evolution to date has been set out in a new study co-led by UCL researchers. The Nature paper describes a new and fast computational approach to obtain precisely dated evolutionary trees, known as 'timetrees'. The authors used the novel method to analyse a mammal genomic dataset and answer a long-standing question around whether modern placental mammal groups originated before or after the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K-Pg) mass extinction, which wiped out over 70% of all species, including all dinosaurs.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 21.12.2021
Exquisitely preserved embryo found inside fossilised dinosaur egg
Exquisitely preserved embryo found inside fossilised dinosaur egg
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email A 72- to 66-million-year-old embryo found inside a fossilised dinosaur egg sheds new light on the link between the behaviour of modern birds and dinosaurs, according to a new study. The embryo, dubbed 'Baby Yingliang', was discovered in the Late Cretaceous rocks of Ganzhou, southern China and belongs to a toothless theropod dinosaur, or oviraptorosaur.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 17.12.2021
Sauropod dinosaurs were restricted to warmer regions of Earth
Sauropod dinosaurs were restricted to warmer regions of Earth
Giant, long-necked sauropods, thought to include the largest land animals ever, preferred to live in warmer regions on Earth, suggesting they may have had a different physiology from other dinosaurs, finds a new study led by researchers at UCL and the University of Vigo. The study, published in the journal Current Biology , investigated the enigma of why sauropod fossils are only found at lower latitudes, while fossils of other main dinosaur types seem ubiquitously present, with many located in the polar regions.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 16.12.2021
Theropod dinosaur jaws became stronger as they evolved - study
Theropod dinosaur jaws became stronger as they evolved - study
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email Theropod dinosaurs evolved more robust jaws through time allowing them to consume tougher food, a new study reveals. Researchers used digital modelling and computer simulation to uncover a common trend of jaw strengthening in theropods - expanding the rear jaw portion in all groups, as well as evolving an upturned jaw in carnivores and a downturned jaw in herbivores.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 08.12.2021
Dinosaurs Spring to Extinction: Springtime pinpointed as the season for dinosaur extinction
An international team led by researchers from The University of Manchester today published in Scientific Reports a groundbreaking study that sheds new light on the timing associated with the dinosaur-killing asteroid impact that occurred 66 million years ago. The study, " Seasonal calibration of the end-Cretaceous Chicxulub Impact Event ", provides new evidence that helps us to understand the significance of the timing for the events that brought an end to the dinosaurs—and 75% of life on Earth.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 08.12.2021
Rare Jurassic fossil reveals never-before-seen ammonite muscles in 3D
Rare Jurassic fossil reveals never-before-seen ammonite muscles in 3D
A research team led by scientists from Cardiff University has provided the first ever 3D visualisation of an ammonite - a marine mollusc group that became extinct with the dinosaurs around 66 million years ago. The new images have allowed the team to analyse the muscles and organs of an ammonite for the very first time, throwing new light on how the cephalopod mollusc was able to swim through the oceans and defend itself from predators.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 30.11.2021
Nibbling prehistoric herbivore sheds new light on Triassic diversity
Nibbling prehistoric herbivore sheds new light on Triassic diversity
A Triassic herbivore, known for its supposed similarities to a modern-day ostrich, has been revealed to have an entirely different approach to feeding from previously thought, according to research involving UCL and University of Birmingham researchers. The new findings, published in The Anatomical Record , reveal a much broader diversity of herbivore behaviour during the Triassic period than has been recognised to date.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 27.10.2021
Fossil dental exams reveal how tusks first evolved
Fossil dental exams reveal how tusks first evolved
Many animals have tusks, from elephants to walruses to hyraxes. But one thing today's tusked animals have in common is that they're all mammals - no known fish, reptiles or birds have them. But that was not always the case. In a study published Oct. 27 in the Proceedings of the Royal Society B, a team of paleontologists at Harvard University, the Field Museum, the University of Washington and Idaho State University traced the first tusks back to ancient mammal relatives that lived before the dinosaurs.

Paleontology - 22.10.2021
Aussie 'raptor-like' dinosaur revealed to be a timid vegetarian
Aussie ’raptor-like’ dinosaur revealed to be a timid vegetarian
Fossil footprints found in an Ipswich coal mine have long been thought to be that of a large 'raptor-like' predatory dinosaur, but scientists have found they were instead left by a timid long-necked herbivore. University of Queensland palaeontologist Dr Anthony Romilio recently led an international team to re-analyse the footprints, dated to the latter part of the Triassic Period, around 220 million-year-ago.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 20.10.2021
A crab's inland odyssey, captured in amber
A crab’s inland odyssey, captured in amber
Researchers have discovered the oldest known modern crab - trapped in amber since the time of the dinosaurs. The 100-million-year-old fossil of the crab, Cretapsara athanata , comes from Myanmar, in Southeast Asia. It fills a major gap in the fossil record for crabs and resets the timetable for when marine crabs made their way inland.

Paleontology - Earth Sciences - 11.10.2021
Oldest footprints of pre-humans identified in Crete
Oldest footprints of pre-humans identified in Crete
The oldest known footprints of pre-humans were found on the Mediterranean island of Crete and are at least six million years old, says an international team of researchers from Germany, Sweden, Greece, Egypt and England, led by Tübingen scientists Uwe Kirscher and Madelaine Böhme of the Senckenberg Center for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment at the University of Tübingen.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 06.10.2021
Oldest theropod dinosaur in the UK discovered in southern Wales
Oldest theropod dinosaur in the UK discovered in southern Wales
Scientists from the Natural History Museum and the University of Birmingham have described a new species of dinosaur from specimens found in a quarry in Pant-y-ffynnon in southern Wales. Following on from a new species of ankylosaur , Pendraig milnerae marks the second new species of dinosaur described by Museum scientists in the last few weeks.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 23.09.2021
Bizarre armoured spikes belong to oldest ankylosaur ever discovered
Bizarre armoured spikes belong to oldest ankylosaur ever discovered
An unusual fossil showing a series of spikes fused to a rib has been revealed to be the remains of the oldest ankylosaur ever found and the first from the African continent. The exciting discovery was made in the Middle Atlas Mountains of Morocco at the same site where researchers from the Natural History Museum (NHM) previously discovered the oldest stegosaur ever found.

Paleontology - Environment - 14.09.2021
Modern snakes evolved from a few survivors of dino-killing asteroid
Modern snakes evolved from a few survivors of dino-killing asteroid
Research from the Milner Centre for Evolution suggests modern snakes evolved from a handful of ancestors that survived the asteroid that killed the dinosaurs. Last updated on Tuesday 14 September 2021 A new study suggests that all living snakes evolved from a handful of species that survived the giant asteroid impact that wiped out the dinosaurs and most other living things at the end of the Cretaceous.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 13.09.2021
Cavities in 54-million-year-old fossils
Cavities in 54-million-year-old fossils
Researchers at the University of Toronto have discovered what are believed to be the oldest known cavities found in a mammal - the likely result of a diet that included eating fruit. The cavities were discovered in fossils of Microsyops latidens, a pointy-snouted animal - no bigger than a racoon - that was part of a group of mammals known as stem primates.

Paleontology - Environment - 31.08.2021
Crocodile tours - fossil Caimans in North America
Crocodile tours - fossil Caimans in North America
A new study of two approximately 52-million-year-old fossil finds from the Green River Formation in Wyoming, USA, has fitted them into the evolutionary history of crocodiles. Biogeologists Jules Wal-ter, Dr. Márton Rabi of the University of Tübingen, working with some other colleagues, determined the extinct species Tsoabichi greenriverensis to be an early caiman crocodile.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 25.08.2021
Peabody fossils illuminate dinosaur evolution in eastern North America
Peabody fossils illuminate dinosaur evolution in eastern North America
Tyrannosaurus rex , the fearsome predator that once roamed what is now western North America, appears to have had an East Coast cousin. A new study by Yale undergraduate Chase Doran Brownstein describes two dinosaurs that inhabited Appalachia - a once isolated land mass that today composes much of the eastern United States - about 85 million years ago: an herbivorous duck-billed hadrosaur and a carnivorous tyrannosaur.
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