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Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Lausanne, EPFL


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Health - Life Sciences - 19.07.2024 - Today
Enhancing breast cancer diagnosis and treatment
Addressing problems with diagnosing and treating breast cancer, scientists at EPFL have developed EMBER, a tool that integrates breast cancer transcriptomic data from multiple databases. EMBER can improve precision oncology by accurately predicting molecular subtypes and therapy responses. Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer worldwide.

Environment - Materials Science - 18.07.2024
Bridging the 'Valley of Death' in carbon capture
Bridging the ’Valley of Death’ in carbon capture
Developed at EPFL, Heriot-Watt University, and ETH Zurich, PrISMa is a new platform that uses advanced simulations and machine learning to streamline carbon capture technologies, by taking into account the perspectives of diverse stakeholders early in the research process. Mitigating the effects of climate change has become a major focus worldwide, with countries and international organizations developing various strategies to address the problem.

Health - Life Sciences - 16.07.2024
Unraveling amyloid fibrils
Unraveling amyloid fibrils
Researchers at EPFL have discovered how amyloid fibrils form complex structures, shedding light on diseases like Alzheimer's and opening new doors in material science. Amyloids are protein aggregates that can form in the body, sometimes leading to diseases like Alzheimer's. These fibrils can adopt multiple shapes, known as "polymorphs", which complicate our understanding of their role in health and disease.

Environment - 15.07.2024
The stirring of the deep waters of Lake Geneva revealed
The stirring of the deep waters of Lake Geneva revealed
Researchers discovered that deepwater renewal in Lake Geneva in wintertime is not only due to vertical mixing. Instead, strong currents coming from the lake's Petit Lac basin and nearshore zones of the Grand Lac play a vital role. In temperate lakes, deep vertical mixing, known as turnover, happens during winter.

Computer Science - Innovation - 09.07.2024
Navigating the labyrinth: How AI tackles complex data sampling
Navigating the labyrinth: How AI tackles complex data sampling
Researchers at EPFL have made a breakthrough in understanding how neural network-based generative models perform against traditional data sampling techniques in complex systems, unveiling both challenges and opportunities for AI's future in data generation. The world of artificial intelligence (AI) has recently seen significant advancements in generative models, a type of machine-learning algorithms that "learn" patterns from set of data in order to generate new, similar sets of data.

Physics - Electroengineering - 05.07.2024
A 2D device for quantum cooling
A 2D device for quantum cooling
EPFL engineers have created a device that can efficiently convert heat into electrical voltage at temperatures lower than that of outer space. The innovation could help overcome a significant obstacle to the advancement of quantum computing technologies, which require extremely low temperatures to function optimally.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.07.2024
AI matches protein interaction partners
Scientists at EPFL unveil DiffPALM, an innovative AI method that enhances the prediction of protein interactions and our understanding of biological processes potentially relevant to medical applications. Proteins are the building blocks of life, involved in virtually every biological process. Understanding how proteins interact with each other is crucial for deciphering the complexities of cellular functions, and has significant implications for drug development and the treatment of diseases.

Physics - Electroengineering - 01.07.2024
Controlling electronics with light: the magnetite breakthrough
Controlling electronics with light: the magnetite breakthrough
Researchers at EPFL have discovered that by shining different wavelengths of light on a material called magnetite, they can change its state, making it more or less conducive to electricity. This could lead to the development of innovative materials for electronics. Magnetite is the oldest and strongest natural magnet.

Health - 26.06.2024
Why some people with the flu may be more contagious
Why some people with the flu may be more contagious
Scientists have discovered that in indoor spaces, droplets containing the flu virus will remain infectious for longer when they also contain certain types of bacteria found in our respiratory tract. This finding provides important insight into how respiratory infections are transmitted and can enhance estimates of exposure risk.

Physics - 25.06.2024
Moving objects precisely with sound
Researchers have succeeded in directing floating objects around an aquatic obstacle course using only soundwaves. Their novel, optics-inspired method holds great promise for biomedical applications such as noninvasive targeted drug delivery. In 2018, Arthur Ashkin won the Nobel Prize in Physics for inventing optical tweezers : laser beams that can be used to manipulate microscopic particles.

Environment - Chemistry - 24.06.2024
Atom-thin graphene membranes make carbon capture more efficient
Atom-thin graphene membranes make carbon capture more efficient
Scientists at EPFL have developed advanced atom-thin graphene membranes with pyridinic-nitrogen at pore edges, showing unprecedented performance in CO2 capture. It marks a significant stride toward more efficient carbon capture technologies. As the world battles climate change, the need for efficient and cost-effective carbon capture technologies is more urgent than ever.

Life Sciences - Health - 21.06.2024
Unifying behavioral analysis through animal foundation models
Unifying behavioral analysis through animal foundation models
Behavioral analysis can provide a lot of information about the health status or motivations of a living being. A new technology developed at EPFL makes it possible for a single deep learning model to detect animal motion across many species and environments. This -foundational model-, called SuperAnimal, can be used for animal conservation, biomedicine, and neuroscience research.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 21.06.2024
Membrane protein analogues could accelerate drug discovery
Membrane protein analogues could accelerate drug discovery
Researchers have created a deep learning pipeline for designing soluble analogues of key protein structures used in pharmaceutical development, sidestepping the prohibitive cost of extracting these proteins from cell membranes. Many drug and antibody discovery pathways focus on intricately folded cell membrane proteins: when molecules of a drug candidate bind to these proteins, like a key going into a lock, they trigger chemical cascades that alter cellular behavior.

Health - Life Sciences - 19.06.2024
Mapping the biology of spinal cord injury in unprecedented detail
Combining advanced molecular mapping technologies and AI, researchers have published an open-source 'atlas' in Nature, providing a comprehensive understanding of spinal cord injury biology in mice and paving the way for new therapies. Scientists at EPFL have achieved a significant research milestone in the field of spinal cord injuries-mapping out the cellular and molecular dynamics of paralysis in unprecedented detail with their open-source project 'Tabulae Paralytica' .

Life Sciences - Health - 19.06.2024
Building a blueprint of metabolic health - from mouse to human
Building a blueprint of metabolic health - from mouse to human
In a new study, scientists have uncovered the complex genetic and environmental interactions influencing metabolic health and have validated their findings in actual human data. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) is a health condition characterized by a group of risk factors: high blood pressure, high blood sugar, unhealthy cholesterol levels, and abdominal fat.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 17.06.2024
High-precision measurements challenge the understanding of Cepheids
High-precision measurements challenge the understanding of Cepheids
Scientists, through the VELOCE project, have clocked the speed of Cepheid stars - "standard candles" that help us measure the size of the universe - with unprecedented precision, offering exciting new insights about them. Photo: RS Puppis , one of the most luminous Cepheid variable star s, rhythmically brightens and dims over a six-week cycle.

Microtechnics - Materials Science - 14.06.2024
Robots au chocolat for dessert?
Robots au chocolat for dessert?
A fully edible robot could soon end up on our plate if we overcome some technical hurdles, say scientists involved in RoboFood - an project which aims to marry robots and food. Robots and food have long been distant worlds: Robots are inorganic, bulky, and non-disposable; food is organic, soft, and biodegradable.

Physics - Innovation - 13.06.2024
Miniaturizing a laser on a photonic chip
Miniaturizing a laser on a photonic chip
Scientists at EPFL have successfully miniaturized a powerful erbium-based biber laser on a silicon-nitride photonic chip. Since typical erbium-based fiber lasers are large and difficult to scale down, the breakthrough promises major advances in optical communications and sensing technologies. Lasers have revolutionized the world since the 60's and are now indispensable in modern applications, from cutting-edge surgery and precise manufacturing to data transmission across optical fibers.

Life Sciences - 12.06.2024
Fruit fly brain shows how simple commands turn into complex behaviors
Fruit fly brain shows how simple commands turn into complex behaviors
Researchers at EPFL have discovered how networks of neurons in fruit flies transform simple brain signals into coordinated actions. This sheds light on the neural mechanisms underlying complex behaviors for potential application in robotics. Understanding how animals, including humans, transform brain signals into coordinated movements is a fundamental question in neuroscience.

Health - Pharmacology - 03.06.2024
Antibody-peptide inhibitor conjugates: a new path for cancer therapy
Antibody-peptide inhibitor conjugates: a new path for cancer therapy
Cancer treatments often struggle with balancing efficacy and side effects. A new study by scientists offers a promising solution using antibody-peptide inhibitor conjugates to target specific cell types and block the activity of cancer-promoting enzymes called cathepsins. Tumor cells often hijack normal physiological processes to support their growth, exploiting proteins that are in charge of essential cell functions.
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