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Life Sciences - Mathematics - 29.08.2016
The brain performs feats of math to make sense of the world
The brain performs feats of math to make sense of the world Posted August 29, 2016; 10:20 a.m. by Bennett McIntosh for the Office of the Dean for Research Even if we find it difficult to calculate complicated probabilities on the spot, our brains constantly carry out these sorts of computations without our awareness — and they're remarkably good at it.

Mathematics - Environment - 23.08.2016
The demise of the Maya civilisation: water shortage can destroy cultures
The demise of the Maya civilisation: water shortage can destroy cultures
Mathematical models analysing the interplay between society and hydrological effects have been developed at TU Wien (Vienna).

Physics - Mathematics - 04.08.2016
On the cusp of quantum supremacy
On the cusp of quantum supremacy
The first step on a new path to quantum supremacy has been proposed by a mathematician from the University of Bristol. Quantum computers are a new type of computing device that use the principles of quantum mechanics to do things that standard computers cannot do. Large-scale quantum computers are predicted to dramatically outperform current supercomputers for tasks ranging from simulating quantum-mechanical systems to cracking cryptographic codes, and could be used to design new drugs and novel materials.

Mathematics - Physics - 29.07.2016
An equation is helping scientists to see parallels between magnets and flocks
An equation is helping scientists to see parallels between magnets and flocks
A scientist has shown mathematically that the dynamics that govern swarms and bird flocks may also govern the properties of things like magnets. The researcher from Imperial College London has developed a mathematical equation to understand more about motility. This phenomenon refers to the ability of individual birds, insects or cells to actively influence the overall shape of swarms, flocks and human tissue.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 11.07.2016
How organ regularity emerges from cell randomness
How organ regularity emerges from cell randomness
An international team (Cornell University, Hokkaido University, Max Planck Institute, Ecole normale supérieure de Lyon / Université Claude Bernard Lyon 1 / CNRS / INRA) unravels how random cell growth contributes to making organs reach the correct size and shape. This study was published in What makes an elephant look like an elephant, or a mouse look like a mouse? How do our two arms reach less than 1% dissimilarity in length? Despite continuous progress in developmental biology, we still do not know the answers to such deceptively simple questions.

Mathematics - Psychology - 20.06.2016
Kass Co-Authors 10 Simple Rules To Use Statistics Effectively
Under growing pressure to report accurate findings as they interpret increasingly larger amounts of data, researchers are finding it more important than ever to follow sound statistical practices.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 01.06.2016
Cooperation Emerges When Groups Are Small and Memories Are Long, Penn Study Finds
The tragedy of the commons , a concept described by ecologist Garrett Hardin, paints a grim view of human nature. The theory goes that, if a resource is shared, individuals will act in their own self-interest, but against the interest of the group, by depleting that resource. Yet examples of cooperation and sharing abound in nature, from human societies down to single-celled bacteria.

Mathematics - 23.05.2016
New Research Training Group in the Field of Asymptotic Geometry
A new Research Training Group (RTG) comprised of mathematicians from Heidelberg University and the Karlsruhe Institute for Technology will be exploring special questions in the field of geometry. Following a successful international expert evaluation, the German Research Foundation (DFG) has awarded the "Asymptotic Invariants and Limits of Groups and Spaces" RTG funding in the amount of approximately four million euros for a period of four and a half years.

Mathematics - 23.05.2016
Why children confuse simple words
Why children confuse simple words
Imagine, for a moment, you are a parent trying to limit how much dessert your sugar-craving young children can eat. "You can have cake or ice cream," you say, confident a clear parental guideline has been laid out. But your children seem to ignore this firm ruling, and insist on having both cake and ice cream.

Mathematics - Chemistry - 23.05.2016
Ocean pollution: focusing on the fragmentation of plastic waste
Ocean pollution: focusing on the fragmentation of plastic waste
First discovered by sailors, the masses of plastic debris floating at the center of vast ocean vortices called gyres are today under close scrutiny by scientists. To better understand the fragmentation of microplastics under the effect of light and abrasion by waves, researchers combined physico-chemical analyses with statistical modeling.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 10.05.2016
Computer Science Advance Could Improve Cybersecurity
AUSTIN, Texas - With an advance that one cryptography expert called a "masterpiece," University of Texas at Austin computer scientists have developed a new method for producing truly random numbers, a breakthrough that could be used to encrypt data, make electronic voting more secure, conduct statistically significant polls and more accurately simulate complex systems such as Earth's climate.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 10.05.2016
Computer Science Breakthrough Could Improve Cybersecurity
AUSTIN, Texas - With an advance that one cryptography expert called a "masterpiece," University of Texas at Austin computer scientists have developed a new method for producing truly random numbers, a breakthrough that could be used to encrypt data, make electronic voting more secure, conduct statistically significant polls and more accurately simulate complex systems such as Earth's climate.

Mathematics - 05.05.2016
Link between handedness and mathematical skills
Link between handedness and mathematical skills
A link between handedness and mathematical skills exists but is more complex than thought, according to a study by the University of Liverpool. The relationship between handedness and mathematical abilities is controversial. Some studies have claimed that left-handers are gifted in mathematics, and strong right-handers perform the worst in mathematical tasks.

Computer Science - Mathematics - 26.04.2016
The language of persuasion
It's not what you say, but how you say it. By analyzing online arguments, Cornell researchers have identified how language and interaction with the other party contribute to winning an argument. Successful arguers start early, stay calm and go into detail. As a spinoff, the research also offers linguistic clues that will show in advance whether your opponent's mind can be changed.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 18.04.2016
Predicting Cell Behaviour with a Mathematical Model
Predicting Cell Behaviour with a Mathematical Model
Scientists from Heidelberg University have developed a novel mathematical model to explore cellular processes: with the corresponding software, they now are able to simulate how large collections of cells behave on given geometrical structures. The software supports the evaluation of microscope-based observations of cell behaviour on micropatterned substrates.

Health - Mathematics - 29.03.2016
Uncertainty can cause more stress than inevitable pain
Uncertainty can cause more stress than inevitable pain
Knowing that there is a small chance of getting a painful electric shock can lead to significantly more stress than knowing that you will definitely be shocked, finds a new UCL study funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC). The study found that situations in which subjects had a 50% chance of receiving a shock were the most stressful while 0% and 100% chances were the least stressful.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 29.03.2016
Neuronal Feedback Could Change What We "See"
Study from Carnegie Mellon Neuroscientists Could Explain Mechanism Behind Optical Illusions By Jocelyn Duffy / 412-268-9982 / jhduffy [a] andrew.cmu (p) edu Ever see something that isn't really there? Could your mind be playing tricks on you? The "tricks" might be your brain reacting to feedback between neurons in different parts of the visual system, according to a study published in The Journal of Neuroscience by Carnegie Mellon University Assistant Professor of Biological Sciences Sandra J. Kuhlman and colleagues.

Mathematics - Computer Science - 22.02.2016
Carnegie Mellon, Stanford Researchers Devise Method To Share Password Data Safely
An unfortunate reality for cybersecurity researchers is that real-world data for their research too often comes via a security breach. Now computer scientists have devised a way to let organizations share statistics about their users' passwords without putting those same customers at risk of being hacked.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 22.02.2016
Why the brain is not folded like a crumpled sheet of paper
Why the brain is not folded like a crumpled sheet of paper
Crumpled paper and Romanesco cauliflower have one thing in common: they have a fractal form. "Scientists have long been discussing whether the curves of our cerebrum have a fractal form," explains Dr. Marc de Lussanet, a researcher at Münster University. Experts want to know how the brain folds are produced in order to understand the brain, its development and possible disorders.

Health - Mathematics - 10.02.2016
Colds Drive Asthma Hospitalizations for Kids
Colds Drive Asthma Hospitalizations for Kids
AUSTIN, Texas - The most dangerous times of year for children with asthma are soon after their schools reopen after a break, and a new study finds that cold viruses are largely to blame. Health experts have observed that children with asthma tend to have the worst symptoms at the same times each year - when school starts in the fall and after extended breaks such as Spring Break.
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