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Mechanical Engineering - Physics - 09.05.2018
Fish in schools can take it easy
Fish in schools can take it easy
Using a new computer model, researchers at the Ecole Centrale de Marseille and CNRS have shown that a fish expends less energy when it swims in a school, because neighbouring fish produce a 'suction' effect. This work will be published on 11 May 2018 in Physical Review Letters . Schools of fish provide a fascinating example of collective behaviour in which the group moves in a coordinated manner without the need for a leader.

Electroengineering - Mechanical Engineering - 03.05.2018
Koman Family Outpatient Pavilion at UC San Diego Health Dedicated
An innovative, eel-like robot developed by engineers and marine biologists at the University of California can swim silently in salt water without an electric motor. Instead, the robot uses artificial muscles filled with water to propel itself. The foot-long robot, which is connected to an electronics board that remains on the surface, is also virtually transparent.

Mechanical Engineering - Innovation - 25.04.2018
Putting the future of flying to the test
Putting the future of flying to the test
The world's most powerful aerospace gearbox will go into service in 2025: It is part of the Rolls-Royce UltraFan design and will transfer up to 100,000 hp. In a project supported by the German federal government, scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are investigating how the gearbox's properties vary according to size and how they can be optimized.

Mechanical Engineering - Life Sciences - 19.03.2018
Taylor Puts New Twist on Measuring Stress in Materials
The U.S. Air Force has awarded Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering Rebecca Taylor funding to develop "nanosprings" that could stick to soft materials or be sprayed onto metals to estimate the mechanical stress a piece of machinery endures. The nanosprings would allow mechanics and engineers to monitor the integrity and function of mechanical equipment, such as struts or aircraft components.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 09.03.2018
Combining scientific languages to create an invisibility cloak
An assistant professor at Brussels' Vrije Universiteit and a visiting professor at Harvard, Vincent Ginis is a brilliant scientist who won a Solvay Award in 2014 and was designated as one of the top 50 tech pioneers in Belgium in 2017. His particular area of study is optics, but he makes a strong case for the combination of different scientific disciplines, or "languages", to drive progress in research.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 14.02.2018
Acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent aircraft accidents
Acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent aircraft accidents
Pitots, which provide airspeed data, have played a role in several aircraft accidents, including the fatal Air France Flight 447 in 2009. New research by aerospace engineers at the University of Bristol has found that an acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent future accidents by making pilots aware of a blocked Pitot before a situation becomes critical.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 14.02.2018
Tissue mechanics essential for cell movement
Cells that form facial features need surrounding embryonic tissues to stiffen so they can move and develop, according to new UCL-led research. The discovery has important implications for understanding the causes of facial defects which account for a third of all birth defects globally (3.2 million each year) and are the primary cause of infant mortality.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 07.02.2018
The Schrödinger equation as a Quantum clock
The Schrödinger equation as a Quantum clock
Researchers succeed in controlling multiple quantum interactions in a realistic material Materials with controllable quantum mechanical properties are of great importance for the electronics and quantum computers of the future.

Mechanical Engineering - Computer Science - 02.02.2018
Automating materials design
Automating materials design
For decades, materials scientists have taken inspiration from the natural world. They'll identify a biological material that has some desirable trait - such as the toughness of bones or conch shells - and reverse-engineer it. Then, once they've determined the material's "microstructure," they'll try to approximate it in human-made materials.

Art and Design - Mechanical Engineering - 24.01.2018
Artificial sounds for traffic safety
Artificial sounds for traffic safety
Research news The almost complete silence of the motors used in electric cars may pose a hazard to inattentive pedestrians. As a result, starting in summer 2019 all new electric and hybrid vehicles will have to be equipped with an acoustic warning system. Psychoacousticians at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) are developing the corresponding sounds.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 16.01.2018
How the temperature of your nose shows how much strain you are under
Researchers at the University of Nottingham's Institute for Aerospace Technology (IAT), together with academic staff from the Bioengineering and Human Factors Research Groups, have demonstrated that facial temperatures, which can be easily measured using a non-invasive thermal camera, are strongly correlated to mental workload.

Health - Mechanical Engineering - 08.01.2018
Breast cancer research gets a mechanical boost
Stanford researchers say one way to solve the mystery of why some breast cancers are more likely to spread could come from studying the cell's mechanical properties. Ovijit Chaudhuri and his lab are studying how mechanical properties of breast tissue influence tumor cells. (Image credit: Courtesy Department of Mechanical Engineering) One of the most puzzling questions in breast cancer research is why some tumors stay put, while rogue cells from others break free and spread to surrounding tissues, the first step toward creating a more lethal disease.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 08.01.2018
How bacteria turbocharged their motors
How bacteria turbocharged their motors
Using detailed 3D images, researchers have shown how bacteria have evolved molecular motors of different powers to optimize their swimming. The discovery, by a team from Imperial College London, provides insights into evolution at the molecular scale. Bacteria use molecular motors just tens of nanometres wide to spin a tail (or 'flagellum') that pushes them through their habitat.

Mechanical Engineering - 28.11.2017
Dyslexia : when spelling problems impair writing acquisition
Dyslexia : when spelling problems impair writing acquisition
Dyslexia is a learning difficulty which affects the ability to adopt the automatic reflexes needed to read and write. Several studies have sought to identify the source of the problems encountered by individuals with dyslexia when they read. Little attention, however, has been paid to the mechanisms involved in writing.

Physics - Mechanical Engineering - 28.11.2017
Researchers Establish Universal Signature Fundamental to How Glassy Materials Fail
Researchers Establish Universal Signature Fundamental to How Glassy Materials Fail
Dropping a smartphone on its glass screen, which is made of atoms jammed together with no discernible order, could result in it shattering. Unlike metals and other crystalline material, glass and many other disordered solids cannot be deformed significantly before failing and, because of their lack of crystalline order, it is difficult to predict which atoms would change during failure.

Psychology - Mechanical Engineering - 23.11.2017
How badly do you want something? Babies can tell
How badly do you want something? Babies can tell
Babies as young as 10 months can assess how much someone values a particular goal by observing how hard they are willing to work to achieve it, according to a new study from MIT and Harvard University. This ability requires integrating information about both the costs of obtaining a goal and the benefit gained by the person seeking it, suggesting that babies acquire very early an intuition about how people make decisions.

Mechanical Engineering - Health - 17.11.2017
First graders fitter than expected
Research news Childhood obesity is often attributed to a lack of exercise. So what about sports among elementary school students' A team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) pursued this question and collected the results of fitness tests for first-year students over a period of one decade. Their study shows that students did not lose their strength.

Mechanical Engineering - Environment - 17.11.2017
Winds of change for vertical axis turbines?
New research suggests vertical axis turbines, which may have fewer impacts on birds and the environment, could increase public support for new wind energy installations. With global carbon emissions on the rise, wind power continues to be an attractive option for states and countries looking to limit fossil fuel use and increase renewable energy.

Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering - 02.11.2017
Chromosomes 'Cheat' for the Chance to Get Into an Egg
Chromosomes ’Cheat’ for the Chance to Get Into an Egg
Each of your cells contains two copies of 23 chromosomes, one inherited from your father and one from your mother. Theoretically, when you create a gamete - a sperm or an egg -  each copy has a 50-50 shot at being passed on. But the reality isn't so clearcut. Scientists have observed that chromosomes can "cheat," biasing the chance that they will make it into a sex cell.

Economics / Business - Mechanical Engineering - 24.10.2017
Testing the test beds: new Christian Doppler lab at TU Graz
Testing the test beds: new Christian Doppler lab at TU Graz
Starting shot for Christian Doppler Laboratory for Model-Based Control of Complex Test Bed Systems. From vehicles to solar energy systems, practically all systems are becoming more and more complex, are being quickly further developed, and have to be comprehensively tested before use. This calls for suitable high-performance and flexible test beds; but developing them is extremely challenging.