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Results 61 - 80 of 108.


Veterinary - Health - 18.11.2015
New online research collection raises awareness of antimicrobial resistance in horses
New online research collection raises awareness of antimicrobial resistance in horses
To coincide with European Antibiotic Awareness Day , researchers from the University of Liverpool have edited and contributed to a special online collection of research papers relating to the use of, and resistance to, antimicrobials in horses, which is published today by the Equine Veterinary Journal .

Health - Veterinary - 22.10.2015
Human factors are main cause of errors in veterinary practice
Human error is the largest single cause of mistakes made by veterinary surgeons when treating patients, new research by The University of Nottingham has revealed. The study, published in the academic journal The Veterinary Record, found that the majority of errors were caused by the limitations of memory and attention leading to slips, lapses and mistakes that can occur when distracted or under stress.

Health - Veterinary - 12.10.2015
Groundbreaking research to improve diagnosis of colic in horses
Experts in one of the most dangerous health problems in horses have just published new research which could transform the way the condition is diagnosed and treated by vets and horse-owners. The two new studies, carried out by researchers at The University of Nottingham's Vet School , have looked at the first assessment of more than 1,000 horses with colic, and also asked more than 200 vets how they go about diagnosing colic.

Health - Veterinary - 14.04.2015
New virus strain causes Midwest dog flu outbreak
The canine influenza outbreak afflicting more than 1,000 dogs in Chicago and other parts of the Midwest is caused by a different strain of the virus than was earlier assumed, according to laboratory scientists at Cornell University and the University of Wisconsin. Researchers at Cornell say results from additional testing indicate that the outbreak is caused by a virus closely related to Asian strains of influenza A H3N2 viruses, currently in wide circulation in southern Chinese and South Korean dog populations, since they were first identified in 2006.

Veterinary - 16.02.2015
Researchers unearth county colic risk
A particular gastrointestinal disorder, which causes colic, or abdominal pain, in horses, is more prevalent in Lancashire compared with other nearby counties, according to researchers at Lancaster University and the University of Liverpool. They have also found that Idiopathic Focal Eosinophilic Enteritis (IFEE), lesions causing an obstruction in a horse's small intestine, is actually seasonal and occurs more often in younger horses.

Health - Veterinary - 06.01.2015
New treatment offers hope for headshaking in horses
6 January 2015 At present there are no consistently safe and effective methods for the treatment of headshaking in horses. The condition, a neuropathic facial pain syndrome, often leaves affected horses impossible to ride and dangerous to handle, and can result in euthanasia. A new study has found a treatment called percutaneous electrical nerve stimulation (PENS) could reduce signs of the condition in horses.

Veterinary - Life Sciences - 09.12.2014
New research could help the welfare of working animals
Press release issued: 9 December 2014 With over 42 million horses and 95 per cent of the world's donkeys found in developing countries, new research could change the health and welfare of millions of working animals in some of the poorest parts of the world. The three research studies led by Dr Becky Whay , Reader in Animal Welfare and Behaviour in the School of Veterinary Sciences at the University of Bristol, aim to build greater understanding and encourage collaboration in addressing the welfare problems of the world's working equids.

Veterinary - Health - 04.11.2014
Pet owners urged to take firework precautions early
Pet owners should talk to their vets well before the fireworks season starts Research from the University of Liverpool has led to calls for pet owners to talk to their vets well before the fireworks season to avoid unnecessary distress to their animals. The study of 100,000 veterinary appointments conducted alongside the British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA) and the University of Bristol shows that too few owners realise their vet can help, and those who do seek support often do so too late - leaving short-term medication as the only option.

Health - Veterinary - 18.08.2014
Dopamine Replacement Therapy Associated with Increase in Impulse Control Disorders Among Early Parkinson's Disease Patients
Penn Study Finds Dopamine Replacement Therapy Associated with Increase in Impulse Control Disorders Among Early Parkinson's Disease Patients New Penn Medicine research shows that neuropsychiatric symptoms such as depression, anxiety and fatigue are more common in newly diagnosed Parkinson's disease (PD) patients compared to the general population.

Veterinary - 18.08.2014
How to tell what a donkey is thinking
Press release issued: 18 August 2014 Yawning, sighing and stretching are just three behaviours observed in donkeys that have been evaluated in newly published research led by academics from the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences and funded by global equine welfare charity the Brooke.

Health - Veterinary - 10.07.2014
Drinking Alcohol, Even Light-to-Moderate Amounts, Provides No Heart Health Benefit
Reducing the amount of alcoholic beverages consumed, even for light-to-moderate drinkers, may improve cardiovascular health, including a reduced risk of coronary heart disease, lower body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure, according to a new multi-center study published in The BMJ and co-led by the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

Health - Veterinary - 01.07.2014
HIV-infected People with Early-Stage Cancers are up to Four Times More Likely to Go Untreated for Cancer, Penn Study Finds
HIV-infected People with Early-Stage Cancers are up to Four Times More Likely to Go Untreated for Cancer, Penn Study Finds
HIV-infected people diagnosed with cancer are two to four times more likely to go untreated for their cancer compared to uninfected cancer patients, according to a new, large retrospective study from researchers in Penn Medicine 's Abramson Cancer Center and the National Cancer Institute (NCI) published online ahead of print in the Journal of Clinical Oncology .

Health - Veterinary - 25.06.2014
Penn Medicine: Study of Over 450,000 Women Finds 3D Mammography Detects More Invasive Cancers and Reduces Call-Back Rates
Penn Medicine: Study of Over 450,000 Women Finds 3D Mammography Detects More Invasive Cancers and Reduces Call-Back Rates
Reporting in the June 25 issue of JAMA , researchers from Penn Medicine and other institutions found that 3D mammography-known as digital breast tomosynthesis- found significantly more invasive, or potentially lethal, cancers than a traditional mammogram alone and reduced call-backs for additional imaging.

Veterinary - 29.05.2014
Cats found to eat more in the winter
The study found cats eat approximately 15% less food during summer Cats eat more during the winter and owners should give their pet more food during this time, University of Liverpool research has found. Researchers from the University's School of Veterinary Science , in collaboration with colleagues at the Royal Canin Research Centre in France, spent four years monitoring how much cats chose to eat, and found that food intake increased in colder months and decreased during the summer.

Health - Veterinary - 28.05.2014
Longest-lasting Cardiology Guidelines Built on Findings of Randomized Controlled Trials
Longest-lasting Cardiology Guidelines Built on Findings of Randomized Controlled Trials
Clinical practice guideline recommendations related to screening and treatment can change markedly over time as new evidence about best practices and clinical outcomes of various treatments emerges. In a first-of-its-kind study, Penn Medicine researchers examined high-level recommendations published by the American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) between 1998 and 2007 and found that recommendations which were supported by multiple randomized controlled trials were the most "durable" and least likely to change over time.

Health - Veterinary - 19.02.2014
New worm infecting U.S. cats discovered
New worm infecting U.S. cats discovered
When Cornell veterinarians found half-foot-long worms living in their feline patients, they had discovered something new: The worms, Dracunculus insignis , had never before been seen in cats. Published in the February issue of the Journal of Feline Medicine and Surgery, the findings document the first proof that this raccoon parasite can infect cats.

Health - Veterinary - 09.01.2014
Study links poor dolphin health to Gulf oil spill
Study links poor dolphin health to Gulf oil spill
Dolphin health took a toxic nosedive in one of the areas hit hard by the 2010 BP Deepwater Horizon oil spill, according to a new study led by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) that includes work by Cornell scientists. Published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology in December 2013, their work makes a strong association between the spill and the deterioration in dolphin health in a region of the Gulf of Mexico that received heavy and prolonged oil exposure.

Veterinary - 16.12.2013
Common misconceptions by cat owners lead to high numbers of unwanted kittens
Overpopulation in cats is recognised to contribute to high numbers of cats entering rescue shelters each year. New research suggests that the high number of unwanted kittens may be due to common misconceptions held by cat owners. The research led by academics at the University of Bristol's School of Veterinary Sciences is published online in the Veterinary Record .

Health - Veterinary - 03.12.2013
New internet resources are the best bet for vets
Academics at The University of Nottingham have launched two free internet resources for vets. Scientists from the Centre for Evidence-based Veterinary Medicine (CEVM) at the School of Veterinary Medicine and Science have launched BEstBETS for VETS ( www.bestbetsforvets.org ) and VetSRev ( www.nottingham.ac.uk/cevm/vetsrev ).

Veterinary - Administration - 23.07.2013
Newly developed anesthetic for amphibians could aid field researchers
A topical general anesthetic for amphibians developed by veterinary researchers at Illinois could be a low-cost, easy-to-administer tool for scientists conducting research in the field. Cane toads were used in the study. CHAMPAIGN, Ill. Veterinary researchers at the University of Illinois have developed a general anesthetic for amphibians that is administered through their skin.