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Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 15.02.2024
First Swiss Field Trial with CRISPR/Cas9-Modified Barley
First Swiss Field Trial with CRISPR/Cas9-Modified Barley
Agroscope has been granted approval by the Federal Office for the Environment for a field trial with spring barley. The focus is on a barley gene that has been disabled by new breeding techniques. The trial, which will be launched in spring 2024 on the Protected Site in Zurich-Reckenholz and will run for three years, aims to determine whether yields can be increased in this manner.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.09.2023
First Experimental Release of Parasitic Asian Wasp to Control Spotted-Wing Drosophila
First Experimental Release of Parasitic Asian Wasp to Control Spotted-Wing Drosophila
The invasive spotted-wing drosophila (SWD) is a devastating pest in berry, stone fruit and grape crops. A natural antagonist from the fruit fly-s area of origin in East Asia is now due to be released in Switzerland for the first time by Agroscope and CABI. The experimental releases in the Cantons of Jura and Ticino aim to clarify whether this parasitic wasp can become established in Switzerland to regulate the SWD population and reduce production losses.

Agronomy / Food Science - Innovation - 16.02.2023
Agroscope obtains a patent for its new cheese maturing process
Agroscope obtains a patent for its new cheese maturing process
The European Patent Office has granted Agroscope a patent for its new cheese maturing process. This patent was published - and thus became effective - on January 25, 2023 in the European Patent Bulletin. It will now be registered in some countries. In 2020, Agroscope applied for a patent for its new maturing process, which works as follows: after leaving the salt bath, the cheeses are wrapped in a biodegradable cloth.

Environment - 12.12.2022
Global Warming Causes Changes in Swiss Insect Fauna
Global Warming Causes Changes in Swiss Insect Fauna
How has the distribution of insects in Switzerland changed over the past 40 years? The range of many species has expanded, while that of a similar number has contracted. In particular, cold-adapted species have lost ground. These are the findings published in the journal -Nature Communications-. Various studies conducted in Switzerland and elsewhere give cause for concern that climateand land-use change are causing significant adverse effects to insect fauna (-insect decline-).

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 04.11.2022
Measuring Protein Digestibility in the Laboratory while Reducing Animal Testing
Measuring Protein Digestibility in the Laboratory while Reducing Animal Testing
How much of the proteins present in foods can the human body absorb and how high is the quality of these proteins? These are the key questions in discussions about a healthy and sustainable diet. Agroscope has developed a method that can reliably measure the protein digestibility of different foods in the laboratory.

Life Sciences - 01.09.2022
Strawberries 'Remember' Heat and Other Stress
Strawberries ’Remember’ Heat and Other Stress
No memory without a brain? That's not quite true, as shown by an Agroscope study of woodland strawberry: heat and other stress situations influence the DNA of the plants. The resulting changes can help forearm strawberries against subsequent stress situations - they -remember-. With ongoing climate change, plants are faced by stress situations more frequently and at shorter intervals: heat, drought, intense precipitation events, but also cold and altered soil salinity.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 24.05.2022
Tracking Down the Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus
Tracking Down the Tomato Brown Rugose Fruit Virus
Changins/Wädenswil, 24. The tomato brown rugose fruit virus poses a new threat to Swiss agriculture - especially to tomatoes and peppers. Agroscope is playing a key role in controlling this quarantine organism in Switzerland. A newly created research group diagnoses submitted plant samples in the quarantine laboratory via a PCR test.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 24.05.2022
On the trail of the Jordan virus
Changins/Wädenswil, 24. Jordan virus is a new threat to Swiss agriculture - especially to tomatoes and peppers. Agroscope is playing a key role in combating this quarantine organism in Switzerland. A newly created research group diagnoses submitted plant samples in the quarantine laboratory using PCR testing.

Agronomy / Food Science - Environment - 05.04.2022
Hardy Grazing Livestock: Protectors of the Mountain Landscape
Hardy Grazing Livestock: Protectors of the Mountain Landscape
Biodiverse mountain pastures are being overgrown by green alder shrubs. A study conducted by Agroscope and ETHZ shows that hardy sheep and goats can stop shrub encroachment. In particular, the traditional Engadine sheep has a taste for green alder. By debarking the shrub it damages it, thus preventing its spread and protecting valuable alpine pastures.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.04.2021
Biodiversity on Swiss Farmland Recorded Nationwide for the First Time
Biodiversity on Swiss Farmland Recorded Nationwide for the First Time
Many plant and animal species depend on habitats shaped by agriculture. Where and with what frequency do which species occur in the agricultural landscape? What is the state of their habitats? How effective are the measures taken to increase biodiversity? Agroscope's biodiversity monitoring programme 'ALL-EMA' records species and habitat diversity in the Swiss agricultural landscape.

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 11.03.2021
Targeted Imports and Less Food Waste Reduce 'Foodprint'
Targeted Imports and Less Food Waste Reduce ’Foodprint’
How can the environmental impact of our food be reduced? Agroscope calculated that the environmental impact can be improved if food is imported from countries of origin with especially environmentally friendly agricultural production systems. The avoidance of food loss and waste is even more effective in achieving this aim.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 10.11.2020
Seed Treatment with Steam Is Effective Against Cereal Diseases
Seed Treatment with Steam Is Effective Against Cereal Diseases
Seed treatments aim to protect germinating crops from diseases. In collaboration with the agricultural cooperative fenaco, Agroscope examined thermal methods using steam and warm water, among others, for the treatment of cereal seed. The results demonstrate the great potential of these methods. In autumn 2017, the Swiss Confederation initiated a national action plan for reducing the risk of plant protection products (see below).

Environment - Agronomy / Food Science - 05.11.2020
Diversity Increases Yields and Protects the Environment
Diversity Increases Yields and Protects the Environment
Harnessing the forces of nature and agricultural practice in all its variety - that is diversification. Diversification brings benefits - positive impacts on yields and environmental protection. This is the conclusion of an international study in which Agroscope researchers took part, and which was recently published Advances.

Agronomy / Food Science - 26.05.2020
Wild Bees Fly for Research
Wild Bees Fly for Research
What stresses wild bees? Is it certain plant-protection products, the absence of nutrient-rich foods - or a combination of both factors? Together with research partners throughout Europe, Agroscope is investigating these issues. Of the total proceeds from agriculture in Switzerland, around CHF 350 million a year are only generated due to the pollination performance of honeybees and wild bees.

Life Sciences - Environment - 21.04.2020
Pest Control with Genetically Modified Insects
To control pests without pesticides, genetically modified organisms of the same species could be used. The latter carry a gene that is passed on with above-average frequency via sexual reproduction. This gene possesses traits that directly weaken the pest, or prevent pathogens from being transmitted.

Life Sciences - 16.01.2020
No Difference for Beneficials between GM Plants with One or More Bt-Toxins
No Difference for Beneficials between GM Plants with One or More Bt-Toxins
The Biosafety Research Group at Agroscope has conducted a review of the literature on genetically modified plants that produce several insect-active Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins simultaneously. The experts were able to show that the toxins did not pose an increased risk for non-target organisms such as beneficials.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.11.2019
"Without Bacteria and Fungi, the Earth Would Look Like Mars"
Our soils filter drinking water and produces food. Soils only carry out these services, because they harbour thousands fungal and bacteria species which work together like the wheels in a clock mechanism. These are the conclusions reached by a study published in the renowned by researchers from Agroscope and the University of Zurich.

Environment - 19.08.2019
Cows Influence Plant Composition of Pastures
Angus, or Scottish Highland: not all cows are the same when it comes to a preference for different shrub, herbaceous and grass species. Research work carried out by Agroscope with the Universities of Heidelberg and Göttingen in Germany shows that cattle breed influences the botanical composition of pasture.

Life Sciences - Agronomy / Food Science - 19.03.2019
New test method: Simulating in vitro what happens with proteins in vivo
New test method: Simulating in vitro what happens with proteins in vivo
Take protein - for instance, in the form of skimmed-milk powder - and put a pinch of it in a test tube. To determine how efficiently this dietary protein is converted into endogenous protein, follow the recipe described in the online science step-by-step in the laboratory. And voilà, the value of the protein, i.e. its benefit for humans, is revealed.

Health - Agronomy / Food Science - 21.02.2019
New Method Discovered: the Secrets of Lactose Digestion Revealed
New Method Discovered: the Secrets of Lactose Digestion Revealed
Around two-thirds of the global adult population cannot digest lactose - milk sugar - due to a deficiency in lactase, the enzyme that is required for lactose digestion in humans. Generally, consumers are unaware of whether they are able to digest the lactose contained in dairy products. However, Agroscope and Lausanne University Hospital (CHUV) researchers have now discovered a new method to measure the presence of lactase in the human body, and consequently determine an individual's ability to digest lactose.