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Results 61 - 80 of 2740.


Physics - Chemistry - 22.04.2021
Silver ions hurry up, then wait as they disperse
Silver ions hurry up, then wait as they disperse
Rice chemists show ions' staged release from gold-silver nanoparticles could be useful property There's gold in them thar nanoparticles, and there used to be a lot of silver, too. But much of the silver has leached away, and researchers want to know how. Gold-silver alloys are useful catalysts that degrade environmental pollutants, facilitate the production of plastics and chemicals and kill bacteria on surfaces, among other applications.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 21.04.2021
To Design Truly Compostable Plastic, Scientists Take Cues From Nature
To Design Truly Compostable Plastic, Scientists Take Cues From Nature
New technology developed by Berkeley Lab and UC Berkeley could steer plastics away from landfills and oceans - and into your backyard compost bin D espite our efforts to sort and recycle, less than 9% of plastic gets recycled in the U.S., and most ends up in landfill or the environment. Biodegradable plastic bags and containers could help, but if they're not properly sorted, they can contaminate otherwise recyclable #1 and #2 plastics.

Astronomy / Space Science - Chemistry - 20.04.2021
From extravagant to achievable - pushing the boundaries of research to find life beyond Earth
From extravagant to achievable - pushing the boundaries of research to find life beyond Earth
The University of Cambridge is creating a new research initiative, bringing together physicists, chemists, biologists, mathematicians, and earth scientists to answer fundamental questions on the origin and nature of life in the Universe.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 20.04.2021
Perovskite solar cells exceed 25% power-conversion efficiency
Perovskite solar cells exceed 25% power-conversion efficiency
Physical chemists and chemical engineers led by EPFL have used a chemical tweak to push the power-conversion efficiency and operational stability of perovskite solar cells to 25.6% and at least 450 hours respectively. Perovskites are hybrid compounds that can be made from metal halides and organic constituents.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 19.04.2021
The architect of genome folding
The architect of genome folding
The spatial organization of the genome is fundamental for the regulation of our genes and has to be established de novo during early embryogenesis. By combining powerful Drosophila genetics with 3D chromosome modelling, a collaboration between the Giorgetti group at the FMI and the MPI of Immunobiology and Epigenetics in Freiburg revealed a critical role of the epigenetic regulator HP1 in the establishment of 3D genome organization in the early Drosophila embryo.

History / Archeology - Chemistry - 14.04.2021
Ancient pottery reveals the first evidence for honey hunting in prehistoric West Africa
Ancient pottery reveals the first evidence for honey hunting in prehistoric West Africa
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, with colleagues from Goethe University, Frankfurt, has found the first evidence for ancient honey hunting, locked inside pottery fragments from prehistoric West Africa, dating back some 3,500 years ago. Honeybees are an iconic species, being the world's most important pollinator of food crops.

Chemistry - Health - 14.04.2021
New hydrogel can repair tears in human tissue
New hydrogel can repair tears in human tissue
Scientists have developed an injectable gel that can attach to various kinds of soft internal tissues and repair tears resulting from an accident or trauma.

Chemistry - Physics - 09.04.2021
X-Ray Study Recasts Role of Battery Material from Cathode to Catalyst
Newly clarified reactions point to novel applications for a long-studied lithium-rich battery material Wanli Yang, a senior scientist at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, working on a resonant inelastic X-ray scattering (RIXS) system. Yang adapted the RIXS technique for a recent Joule study on lithium-rich battery materials.

Physics - Chemistry - 09.04.2021
Optically Active Defects Improve Carbon Nanotubes
Optically Active Defects Improve Carbon Nanotubes
The properties of carbon-based nanomaterials can be altered and engineered through the deliberate introduction of certain structural "imperfections" or defects. The challenge, however, is to control the number and type of these defects. In the case of carbon nanotubes - microscopically small tubular compounds that emit light in the near-infrared - chemists and materials scientists at Heidelberg University led by Jana Zaumseil have now demonstrated a new reaction pathway to enable such defect control.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 07.04.2021
Designing Selective Membranes for Batteries Using a Drug Discovery Toolbox
By binding specific ions in specially designed cages within its pores, a new membrane could enable more efficient flows in energy storage devices Illustration of caged lithium ions in a new polymer membrane for lithium batteries. Scientists at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry used a drug-discovery toolbox to design the selective membranes.

Chemistry - 07.04.2021
Chain length determines molecular colour
Chain length determines molecular colour
Researchers at ETH Zurich have developed fluorescent polymers whose colour can be easily tuned. Depending on their length, the polymers emit a different colour. Potential applications include biomedicine, security printing and solar energy. Around the world, a huge amount of research and development work is currently being done on carbon-containing, or organic, molecules that emit coloured light after appropriate excitation.

Physics - Chemistry - 06.04.2021
Century-Old Problem Solved With First-Ever 3D Atomic Imaging of an Amorphous Solid
Century-Old Problem Solved With First-Ever 3D Atomic Imaging of an Amorphous Solid
G lass, rubber and plastics all belong to a class of matter called amorphous solids. And in spite of how common they are in our everyday lives, amorphous solids have long posed a challenge to scientists. Since the 1910s, scientists have been able to map in 3D the atomic structures of crystals, the other major class of solids, which has led to myriad advances in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, geology, nanoscience, drug discovery and more.

Physics - Chemistry - 05.04.2021
This Hydrogen Fuel Machine Could Be the Ultimate Guide to Self-Improvement
This Hydrogen Fuel Machine Could Be the Ultimate Guide to Self-Improvement
Study co-led by Berkeley Lab uncovers secret behind humble material's surprise performance as an artificial photosynthesis device Three years ago, scientists at the University of Michigan discovered an artificial photosynthesis device made of silicon and gallium nitride (Si/GaN) that harnesses sunlight into carbon-free hydrogen for fuel cells with twice the efficiency and stability of some previous technologies.

Physics - Chemistry - 31.03.2021
Century-old problem solved with first-ever 3D atomic imaging of an amorphous solid
Glass, rubber and plastics all belong to a class of matter called amorphous solids. And in spite of how common they are in our everyday lives, amorphous solids have long posed a challenge to scientists. Since the 1910s, scientists have been able to map in 3D the atomic structures of crystals, the other major class of solids, which has led to myriad advances in physics, chemistry, biology, materials science, geology, nanoscience, drug discovery and more.

Physics - Chemistry - 31.03.2021
ALPHA cools antimatter using laser light for the first time
ALPHA cools antimatter using laser light for the first time
Geneva, 31 March 2021. The ALPHA collaboration at CERN has succeeded in cooling down antihydrogen atoms - the simplest form of atomic antimatter - using laser light. The technique, known as laser cooling, was first demonstrated 40 years ago on normal matter and is a mainstay of many research fields.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 30.03.2021
Research given significant boost to develop lithium-rich battery cathodes
A team of scientists, including those based at the University of Oxford as part of the Faraday Institution CATMAT project, researching next-generation cathode materials have made a significant breakthrough in understanding oxygen-redox processes involved in lithium-rich cathode materials. The paper proposes strategies that offer potential routes to increase the energy density of lithium-ion batteries.

Chemistry - Physics - 30.03.2021
Researchers first to link silicon atoms on surfaces
Researchers first to link silicon atoms on surfaces
Materials such as gallium arsenide are extremely important for the production of electronic devices. As supplies of it are limited, or they can present health and environmental hazards, specialists are looking for alternative materials. So-called conjugated polymers are candidates. These organic macromolecules have semi-conductor properties, i.e. they can conduct electricity under certain conditions.

Chemistry - Environment - 30.03.2021
Researchers aim to reduce emissions of process which feeds 40% of the world
A new research project is setting out to investigate how to make an industrial process which helps feed nearly half the world's population more sustainable. The Haber-Bosch process, developed in the early 20th Century, was the first economically-viable large-scale ammonia production process. It works by combining nitrogen and hydrogen under high pressures, with the addition of an iron-based catalyst which helps the process work at a moderate temperature.

Chemistry - Pharmacology - 25.03.2021
Chemists achieve breakthrough in the production of three-dimensional molecular structures
Chemists achieve breakthrough in the production of three-dimensional molecular structures
A major goal of organic and medicinal chemistry in recent decades has been the rapid synthesis of three-dimensional molecules for the development of new drugs. These drug candidates exhibit a variety of improved properties compared to predominantly flat molecular structures, which are reflected in clinical trials by higher efficacy and success rates.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 25.03.2021
First closeups of how a lithium-metal electrode ages
Scientists have documented a process that makes these next-gen batteries lose charge - and eventually some of their capacity for storing energy - even when a device is turned off. The same process that drains the battery of your cell phone even when it's turned off is even more of a problem for lithium-metal batteries, which are being developed for the next generation of smaller, lighter electronic devices, far-ranging electric vehicles and other uses.