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Electroengineering - 12.03.2012
Professors Give Failing Grades to Electronic Vote Systems
Professors Give Failing Grades to Electronic Vote Systems
Reception and service at central level for international students after arrival at KTH. For Master's students For Exchange students At the KTH Symposium, the director of the U.S. National Science Foundation explains how scientific co-operation with Sweden benefits American research.

Electroengineering - 06.03.2012
Apprentice electricians are underpaid and undervalued, finds research
Despite Australia's critical shortage of skilled workers, many trade apprentices are living on a wage that falls below the poverty line and is barely higher than the unemployment benefit, according to research from the University of Sydney's Workplace Research Centre (WRC). The Electrical Trades Union (ETU) has commissioned researchers from the WRC to prepare a report on the work, wages and living standards of electrical apprentices as part of Fair Work Australia's review of modern awards.

Physics - Electroengineering - 05.03.2012
Scientists revolutionise electron microscope
Scientists revolutionise electron microscope
Scientists revolutionise electron microscope Researchers at the University of Sheffield have revolutionised the electron microscope by developing a new method which could create the highest resolution images ever seen. For over 70 years, transmission electron microscopy (TEM), which `looks through´ an object to see atomic features within it, has been constrained by the relatively poor lenses which are used to form the image.

Electroengineering - Physics - 13.02.2012
Engineers weld nanowires with light
At the nano level, researchers at Stanford have discovered a new way to weld together meshes of tiny wires. Their work could lead to innovative electronics and solar applications. To succeed, they called upon plasmonics. One area of intensive research at the nanoscale is the creation of electrically conductive meshes made of metal nanowires.

Physics - Electroengineering - 02.02.2012
Graphene electronics moves into a third dimension
Graphene electronics moves into a third dimension
Wonder material graphene has been touted as the next silicon, with one major problem – it is too conductive to be used in computer chips. Now scientists from The University of Manchester have given its prospects a new lifeline. In a paper published this week in Science , a Manchester team lead by Nobel laureates Professor Andre Geim and Professor Konstantin Novoselov has literally opened a third dimension in graphene research.

Electroengineering - 19.12.2011
Landmark find has magnetic appeal
A fundamental problem that has long puzzled scientists has been solved after more than 70 years. An international team of researchers has discovered a subtle electronic effect in magnetite, the most magnetic of all naturally occurring minerals. The effect causes a dramatic change to how this material conducts electricity at very low temperatures.

Electroengineering - Physics - 07.12.2011
Researchers develop one of the world’s smallest electronic circuits
Discovery is of a fundamental interest for the development of future electronics A team of scientists, led by Guillaume Gervais from McGill's Physics Department and Mike Lilly from Sandia National Laboratories, has engineered one of the world's smallest electronic circuits. It is formed by two wires separated by only about 150 atoms or 15 nanometers (nm).

Electroengineering - Health - 22.11.2011
Big step forward for safety of bionic contact lenses
Big step forward for safety of bionic contact lenses
Hands-free information could stream across your lens, in a device that came one step closer to reality this week. In a new paper , University of Washington researchers demonstrated the safety of a prototype device tested in the eye of a rabbit. At the moment, the lens device contains only a single pixel of information, but the researchers say it is a proof of the concept that the device could be worn by a person.

Electroengineering - Chemistry - 22.11.2011
Blocked holes can enhance rather than stop light going through, engineers find
Blocked holes can enhance rather than stop light going through, engineers find
by Steven Schultz Conventional wisdom would say that blocking a hole would prevent light from going through it, but Princeton University engineers have discovered the opposite to be true. A research team has found that placing a metal cap over a small hole in a metal film does not stop the light at all, but rather enhances its transmission.

Physics - Electroengineering - 09.11.2011
Los Alamos researchers unravel the mystery of quantum dot blinking
Los Alamos researchers unravel the mystery of quantum dot blinking
Most exciting is that the Los Alamos researchers have shown that blinking can be controlled and even completely suppressed electrochemically. LOS ALAMOS, New Mexico, November 9, 2011—Research by Los Alamos scientists published today documents significant progress in understanding the phenomenon of quantum-dot blinking.

Life Sciences - Electroengineering - 19.09.2011
Scientists can now ’see’ how different parts of our brain communicate
A new technique which lets scientists 'see' our brain waves at work could revolutionise our understanding of the human body's most complex organ and help transform the lives of people suffering from schizophrenia and ADHD. Although, scientifically, the brain is the most studied organ in our body we still know relatively little about it.

Electroengineering - Physics - 05.09.2011
Research gives crystal clear temperature readings from toughest environments
Researchers have developed a form of crystal that can deliver highly accurate temperature readings, down to individual milli-kelvins, over a very broad range of temperatures: -120to +680 degrees centigrade. The researchers used a "birefringent" crystal which splits light passing through it into two separate rays.

Electroengineering - Physics - 31.08.2011
Scientists observe smallest atomic displacements ever
Scientists observe smallest atomic displacements ever
UCL scientists are part of an international team which has developed a novel X-ray technique for imaging atomic displacements in materials with unprecedented accuracy. The team has applied the technique to determine how a recently discovered class of exotic materials - multiferroics - can be simultaneously both magnetically and electrically ordered.

Physics - Electroengineering - 31.08.2011
An innovative method for measuring nanoparticles
An innovative method for measuring nanoparticles
Precise measurement of the molecular weight, size and density of a nanoparticle in a single procedure is now possible, thanks to an ultracentrifugation method. Although nanoparticles are used in a variety of domains - such as medicine, solar energy and photonics - there is still much about them to be discovered.

Physics - Electroengineering - 31.08.2011
Graphene’s shining light could lead to super-fast internet
Graphene’s shining light could lead to super-fast internet
Internet connection speeds could be tens of times faster than they currently are, thanks to research by University of Manchester scientists using wonder material graphene. A collaboration between the Universities of Manchester and Cambridge, which includes scientists Andre Geim and Kostya Novoselov, has discovered a crucial recipe for improving characteristics of graphene devices for use as photodetectors in future high-speed optical.

Electroengineering - Environment - 29.08.2011
A high-tech propulsion system for the next 100 years
A high-tech propulsion system for the next 100 years
Environmentally friendly fuels are not just of interest for use in cars. The University of Birmingham has been operating a canal boat with a fuel cell drive for three years now.

Physics - Electroengineering - 19.08.2011
New method detects emerging sunspots deep inside the sun
New method detects emerging sunspots deep inside the sun
Sunspots spawn solar flares that can cause billions of dollars in damage to satellites, networks and power grids. But researchers have developed a way to detect incipient sunspots as deep as 65,000 kilometers inside the sun, providing up to two days' advance warning of a damaging solar flare. Viewed from the technological perspective of modern humans, the sun is a seething cauldron of disruptive influences that can wreak havoc on communication systems, air travel, power grids and satellites - not to mention astronauts in space.

Physics - Electroengineering - 18.08.2011
Bending Light the "Wrong" Way
The effect can be seen just by poking a stick into the water; at the water surface, the light changes its direction, the stick appears to be bent. This tilt is described by the refractive index. For years, scientists have been trying to create special materials with a negative refractive index - their optical properties are quite different from those of normal materials.

Electroengineering - Physics - 12.08.2011
Bilayer graphene: another step towards graphene electronics
Bilayer graphene: another step towards graphene electronics
Researchers have taken a step forward in studying the wonder material graphene and revealing its exciting electronic properties for future electronic applications. The academics have revealed more about the electronic properties of its slightly fatter cousin - bilayer graphene. The researchers, from the universities of Manchester, Lancaster (UK), Nijmegen (the Netherland) and Moscow (Russia), have studied in detail the effect of interactions between electrons on the electronic properties of bilayer graphene.

Mechanical Engineering - Electroengineering - 03.08.2011
A new motor for the watch of tomorrow
A new motor for the watch of tomorrow
An electromagnetic three-phase motor will enable the watchmaking industry to build watches that are three times more efficient and that can include more applications.
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