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Life Sciences - Innovation - 29.06.2022
Startup brings RNA sequencing into the age of big data
Startup brings RNA sequencing into the age of big data
EPFL spin-off Alithea Genomics has developed a system that allows scientists to easily tag bulk RNA samples with molecular barcodes so they can be processed by the hundreds in one single tube. The technology promises to dramatically shorten and streamline sample preparation for RNA sequencing, which will enable new applications for this technology, such as biomarker discovery and drug development.

Mechanical Engineering - 29.06.2022

Event - 29.06.2022

Campus - Innovation - 29.06.2022

Campus - 29.06.2022
Transforming our student admissions service
Transforming our student admissions service
Sign up for an Admissions Transformation Programme Town Hall to find out more about UCL's approach to admissions for 2023 and beyond.

Environment - Innovation - 29.06.2022
Opinion: Even temporarily overshooting 2°C would cause permanent damage to Earth's species
Opinion: Even temporarily overshooting 2°C would cause permanent damage to Earth’s species
Writing in The Conversation, Dr Alex Pigot (UCL Biosciences) and his team at the University of Cape Town warn that if Earth warms more than 2 degrees C, even temporarily, much of the damage to Earth's endangered species will be irreversible and biodiversity will seriously suffer.

Environment - Economics / Business - 29.06.2022
Carnegie Mellon Professor Launches ESG Index
The ESG Index will serve as the go-to resource for accurate data in monetary pollution Investing according to environmental, social and governance (ESG) criteria has gained considerable momentum in recent years.

Health - Life Sciences - 29.06.2022
Trigger that sets off metastasis in pancreatic cancer
Scientists have found that cancers in the pancreas (left) readily metastasize because these tumors suppress levels of an enzyme, MSRA, that pulls oxygen atoms off amino acids called methionine. As MSRA levels decrease, methionines on proteins become more oxidized. This causes one particular protein to rev up energy production in the tumor, promoting the migration of cancer cells to other organs.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 29.06.2022
A biology lab in the palm of your hands
A biology lab in the palm of your hands
A student-created app brings the biology lab experience to users' smartphones, paving the way for a more accessible lab education Johns Hopkins University undergraduate students who missed in-person

Innovation - Health - 29.06.2022
Meet the newest grantees of the Cohen Translational Engineering Fund
Meet the newest grantees of the Cohen Translational Engineering Fund
The fund provides early funding for commercialization of faculty members' cutting-edge research Two faculty teams with members affiliated with the Johns Hopkins Whiting School of Engineering have received grants for their research through the Cohen Translational Engineering Fund.

Health - Innovation - 29.06.2022
Commercialization, accelerated
Commercialization, accelerated
The recently expanded technology development team at Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures aims to speed up the commercialization process for viable ideas Johns Hopkins Technology Ventures , JHTV, has ex

Computer Science - 29.06.2022
’Fake’ data helps robots learn the ropes faster
A way to expand training data sets for manipulation tasks improves the performance of robots by 40% or more In a step toward robots that can learn on the fly like humans do, a new approach expands tr

Health - 29.06.2022
Long COVID: Women, Hispanics and lower-income Michiganders hit hardest
Long COVID was more prevalent among women, Hispanics and those with lower incomes, according to the most recent Michigan COVID-19 Recovery Surveillance Study report. The report also shows that those with a Body Mass Index over 30 are also more likely to have long-term post-COVID symptoms. The Michigan COVID-19 Recovery Surveillance Study, or MI CReSS-a joint collaboration between the University of Michigan School of Public Health and Michigan Department of Health and Human Services-is a population-based survey geared toward collecting data from adults who have recovered from COVID-19.

Chemistry - 28.06.2022

Health - 28.06.2022
Open Air Factor: a natural form of infection control?
Open Air Factor: a natural form of infection control?
A leading infectious diseases expert from The Australian National University (ANU) suggests a forgotten but formidable protective agent that's been documented in medical journals for close to two centuries could be key to defending against airborne bacteria and viruses , including COVID-19. Professor Peter Collignon AM said the fresh air we breathe outdoors has certain germicidal properties that can "dilute" and limit the spread of harmful bacteria and viruses outside.

Physics - Health - 28.06.2022
Speech-friendly face mask could end frustration of muffled chat
Speech-friendly face mask could end frustration of muffled chat
A new face mask designed by Manchester researchers is promising to end the stress and anxiety talkers and listeners experience when they cover up. Designed by a team at The Universities of Manchester and Salford , and the National Institute for Health and Care Research (NIHR) Manchester Biomedical Research Centre (BRC) , the revolutionary design will protect wearers from viruses such as COVID-19.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 28.06.2022
7.4 million euros for research into products from wastewater
Showering, cleaning, flushing toilets, and industrial production are all processes that use a great deal of water.

Health - Innovation - 28.06.2022
’Hologram patients’ developed to help train doctors and nurses
A new partnership involving Cambridge University Hospitals (CUH) and the University's Faculty of Education, brings medical training using -mixed reality- technology one step closer.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2022

Philosophy - 28.06.2022
A moral right to stay: Guest commentary
Should more immigration be allowed, not only to counter the threat of an ageing population in our society but also to help with the problem of a lack of skilled workers?

Agronomy / Food Science - 28.06.2022
Backyard beekeepers needed to spy on native stingless bees
Backyard beekeepers needed to spy on native stingless bees
Scientists at the University of Queensland are buzzing about a new citizen science project investigating some of Australia's native bee species in our own backyards. Dr Gurion Ang and Dr Tobias Smith from UQ's School of Biological Sciences are calling on citizen beekeepers to help observe native stingless bees, to better understand them and how their colonies reproduce.

Campus - History / Archeology - 28.06.2022

Social Sciences - 28.06.2022
BASF to catalyse passion for science amongst primary school children in Western Australia with two BASF Kids’ Lab events
BASF, the world's leading chemical company, will once again partner with Curtin University to ignite interest in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Math) subjects amongst primary school students from Year 4 - 6 from WA with the latest edition of the popular BASF Kids' Lab program.

Music - Social Sciences - 28.06.2022
Party hard but party safe at the Montreux Jazz Festival
Party hard but party safe at the Montreux Jazz Festival
An EPFL PhD candidate in urban sociology spent four years working at the Montreux Jazz Festival in order to gain insights into how safety and security are managed, both within and around this world-famous event.

Chemistry - Environment - 28.06.2022
Aiming at an industry without CO2 emissions
Aiming at an industry without CO2 emissions
On 20 June, the Association for the Decarbonization of Industry with representatives from industry, energy suppliers, the financial sector and research adopted a joint strategy with the aim of developing holistic approaches for CO2 cuts in industrial applications that can rapidly be implemented. The focus is on high-temperature processes and logistics.

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.06.2022

Life Sciences - Environment - 28.06.2022
Using native plants to filter a ubiquitous water contaminant
Using native plants to filter a ubiquitous water contaminant
This summer a biology student is testing the potential of three plants native to Canada to remove the widespread contaminant triclosan from water. Every day, large quantities of human-generated synthetic chemicals enter Quebec's wetlands and waterways, altering natural cycles. One example is triclosan, a chemical compound found in a wide range of everyday consumer goods such as toothpaste, soap and deodorant.

Life Sciences - Health - 28.06.2022