Category


Years
2019 | 2018 | 2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008


Results 41 - 60 of 1569.


Palaeontology - Life Sciences - 15.08.2019
Dinosaur brains from baby to adult
Dinosaur brains from baby to adult
New research by a University of Bristol palaeontology post-graduate student has revealed fresh insights into how the braincase of the dinosaur Psittacosaurus developed and how this tells us about its posture. Psittacosaurus was a very common dinosaur in the Early Cretaceous period - 125 million years ago - that lived in eastern Asia, especially north-east China.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.08.2019
Dog detectives sniff out harmful bacteria causing lung infections
Dog detectives sniff out harmful bacteria causing lung infections
Sniffer dogs have been trained to detect ultra-low concentrations of bacteria which cause lung infection in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients. In a study by Imperial College London and the charity Medical Detection Dogs , researchers found that specially trained medical detection dogs were able to detect ultra-low concentrations of Pseudomonas aeruginosa (Pa), the most common cause of lung infection in people with CF.

Health - Environment - 15.08.2019
Heatwaves Increase Emergency Admissions to Swiss Hospitals
Heatwaves Increase Emergency Admissions to Swiss Hospitals
Numerous studies have shown that heat increases mortality rates. 1,2 In Switzerland, for example, the hot summer of 2015 caused around 800 additional deaths. 3 Only a few studies, however, have investigated the effects of heatwaves on morbidity and hospital admissions. Researchers from the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) recently conducted a detailed analysis of emergency hospital admissions in Switzerland during the three heatwaves between June and August 2015 in a study commissioned by the Federal Office for the Environment (FOEN).

Health - 15.08.2019
Bringing back the colour to Egyptian coffin
The re-colourisation of a 2,600 year old coffin will give visitors to the Chau Chak Wing Museum a vivid picture of the colours and hieroglyphics used to decorate wooden coffins in 7 th century BC Egypt. The digital model of the coffin of Mer-Neith-it-es will feature in the dedicated Mummy Room at the new museum, due to open next year.

Health - Materials Science - 15.08.2019
Plasma coating developed to decrease bone implant rejections
Plasma coating developed to decrease bone implant rejections
One million Australians have undergone joint replacement surgery and the numbers are growing. University of Sydney researchers have developed a bone implant coating that could lead to improved implant outcomes. An international research project, led by the University of Sydney's School of Aerospace, Mechanical and Mechatronic Engineering and the School of Physics in collaboration with UMC Utrecht and the Heart Research Institute and three other research partners, has developed a new plasma coating for bone implants with the aim of decreasing complications.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.08.2019
Asthmatics over-using over-the-counter puffers: study
Asthmatics over-using over-the-counter puffers: study
For the first time, details about Australians using over-the-counter reliever puffers have been revealed, indicating people may be placing themselves at risk by not getting a diagnosis and taking preventative medication. Australian asthmatics are overusing reliever medication, according to new research that strongly suggests many are failing to manage their condition.

Computer Science / Telecom - Microtechnics - 14.08.2019
A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots
A miniature stretchable pump for the next generation of soft robots
Scientists at EPFL have developed a tiny pump that could play a big role in the development of autonomous soft robots, lightweight exoskeletons and smart clothing. Flexible, silent and weighing only one gram, it is poised to replace the rigid, noisy and bulky pumps currently used. The scientists' work has just been published in Nature.

Business / Economics - 14.08.2019
Offers insight into effects of housing eviction on people’s lives
Each year, more than 2 million U.S. households face the prospect of eviction, a disruptive event widely believed to trigger increased financial strain. A new study finds that by the time most tenants land in eviction court, they have already suffered years of intensifying financial distress.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 14.08.2019
Drug accelerates blood system’s recovery after chemotherapy, radiation
A drug developed by UCLA physician-scientists and chemists speeds up the regeneration of mouse and human blood stem cells after exposure to radiation. If the results can be replicated in humans, the compound could help people recover quicker from chemotherapy, radiation and bone marrow transplants. The study , published , also sheds light on the basic biology behind blood stem cell regeneration and the role of a specific molecular process that is blocked by the new drug.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.08.2019
Questions expected link between farming and evolution of immune system
Researchers have long theorized that cultural shifts thousands of years ago from hunting and gathering to agriculture and living in permanent settlements spurred an increase in diseases like smallpox and measles. Compared to hunter-gatherers, farmers stayed put, living close to one another and their animals.

Environment - 14.08.2019
New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling
New insight into glaciers regulating global silicon cycling
A new review of silicon cycling in glacial environments, led by scientists from the University of Bristol, highlights the potential importance of glaciers in exporting silicon to downstream ecosystems. This, say the researchers, could have implications for marine primary productivity and impact the carbon cycle on the timescales of ice ages.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.08.2019
Nanocapsule reaches cancer that has spread to central nervous system in mice
FINDINGS Cancer that has spread to the central nervous system is notoriously difficult to treat. Now, UCLA researchers have developed a drug delivery system that breaks through the blood-brain barrier in order to reach and treat cancer that has spread to the central nervous system. In research conducted in mice, a single dose of cancer drugs in a nanoscale capsule developed by the scientists eliminated all B-cell lymphoma that had metastasized to the animals' central nervous system.

Computer Science / Telecom - Environment - 14.08.2019
GW4 supercomputer Isambard proves competitive
Researchers from GW4 universities Bristol and Cardiff assessed the performance of the GW4 Alliance Isambard supercomputer using an open-source Large-Eddy Simulation (LES) code. The research team consisted of Unai Lopez Novoa, Data Innovation Research Institute; Pablo Ouro Barba, Cardiff School of Engineering; Dr James Price, University of Bristol and Professor Simon McIntosh Smith, the principal investigator for the Isambard project and a professor of high-performance computing at the University of Bristol.

Physics - Materials Science - 14.08.2019
Physicists Develop "Time Machine" for Materials Science
Physics experiments are often time-consuming and expensive. Sometimes scientists do not realize until the very end that they have been using the wrong calibration for measurements the whole time. What if there were a way to go back in time to the start of the experiment and re-examine the data? Researchers at Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU), Freie Universität Berlin, and the Technical University of Munich (TUM) hope to create a machine that would make that possible.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 14.08.2019
Wind it up: Europe has the untapped onshore capacity to meet global energy demand
Wind it up: Europe has the untapped onshore capacity to meet global energy demand
Europe has the capacity to produce more than 100 times the amount of energy it currently produces through onshore windfarms, new analysis from the University of Sussex and Aarhus University has revealed. In an analysis of all suitable sites for onshore wind farms, the new study reveals that Europe has the potential to supply enough energy for the whole world until 2050.

Social Sciences - 14.08.2019
Uncovers how heavy social media use disrupts girls’ mental health
Frequent, heavy social media use can disrupt activities which promote positive mental health in girls, new research suggests. The findings come from the first comprehensive observational study into how very frequent use of platforms such as Instagram, Facebook, Snapchat and WhatsApp may harm the mental health of young people.

Environment - 14.08.2019
Cool Roofs Can Help Shield California's Cities Against Heat Waves
Cool Roofs Can Help Shield California’s Cities Against Heat Waves
New Berkeley Lab study finds that in reducing air temperatures, cool roofs could protect urbanites from heat waves This summer alone, intense heat waves have been to blame for at least 11 deaths in Japan, a record-breaking 45.9-degree Celsius temperature in France, and a heat advisory affecting 147 million people on the U.S. East Coast.

Life Sciences - 14.08.2019
What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us about the evolution of mammals
What a group of bizarre-looking bats can tell us about the evolution of mammals
Bats with skulls and teeth adapted to a wide range of diets are helping scientists understand how major groups of mammals first evolved. By analysing the skulls of a group of bats that feed on everything from nectar to blood, researchers from the US and Imperial College London have identified how the bats have tweaked their development to adapt to different diets.

Life Sciences - 14.08.2019
Revolutionising the CRISPR method
Revolutionising the CRISPR method
Researchers at ETH Zurich have refined the famous CRISPR-Cas method. Now, for the very first time, it is possible to modify dozens, if not hundreds, of genes in a cell simultaneously. Everyone's talking about CRISPR-Cas. This biotechnological method offers a relatively quick and easy way to manipulate single genes in cells, meaning they can be precisely deleted, replaced or modified.

Health - Life Sciences - 14.08.2019
UTI discovery may lead to new treatments
UTI discovery may lead to new treatments
Sufferers of recurring urinary tract infections (UTIs) could expect more effective treatments thanks to University of Queensland-led research. UTIs are one of the most common bacterial infections according to Professor Mark Schembri from UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences. “They're a major burden on global healthcare,” he said.

This site uses cookies and analysis tools to improve the usability of the site. More information. |