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Results 41 - 60 of 1847.


Physics - Innovation - 27.06.2022
New miniature atomic clocks to be released soon
New miniature atomic clocks to be released soon
Coordinated by the CSEM, the large European quantum project macQsimal, included in the FET Flagship on Quantum Technologies initiative, is nearing its end and reveals very promising results.

Materials Science - 27.06.2022
New approach reduces EV battery testing time by 75%
System developed at the University of Michigan saves time and money in the race to create better batteries for the electric vehicle revolution Testing the longevity of new electric vehicle battery designs could be four times faster with a streamlined approach, researchers at the University of Michigan have shown.

Health - 27.06.2022
Researchers look at space between nerves and tumor cells to identify most aggressive oral cancers
One of the most terrifying aspects of cancer is its unpredictability: Some cancerous tumors are cured by treatment, while others shrink with treatment only to return later. Study: Spatial and Transcriptomic Analysis of Perineural Invasion in Oral Cancer A new University of Michigan study identifies a feature in cancer that could help pinpoint treatment-resistant tumors when they are diagnosed, so oncologists know to treat aggressively from the beginning, with the hope of giving patients a better chance at survival.

Chemistry - Environment - 27.06.2022
New PET-like plastic made directly from waste biomass
New PET-like plastic made directly from waste biomass
Scientists have developed a new, PET-like plastic that is easily made from the non-edible parts of plants. The plastic is tough, heat-resistant, and a good barrier to gases like oxygen, making it a promising candidate for food packaging. Due to its structure, the new plastic can also be chemically recycled and degrade back to harmless sugars in the environment.

Environment - Materials Science - 27.06.2022
Green electronics project sets out to create compostable crop sensors
An international research collaboration is setting out to find new ways of monitoring grop growth with biodegradable sensors which can be composted at the end of their lifespan. The £1.8m CHIST-ERA project, called Transient Electronics for Sustainable ICT in Digital Agriculture, is led by researchers from the University of Glasgow and supported by colleagues in Canada, Finland, Poland and Switzerland.

Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
Pre-natal exposure to alcohol: fathers may be partly responsible
Pre-natal exposure to alcohol: fathers may be partly responsible
In male mice, alcohol consumption in the weeks preceding conception affects the transcription of genes important for fetal development Preventing fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) has traditionally been seen as a maternal responsibility, but a growing body of research suggests that fathers have a responsibility as well.

Environment - Campus - 27.06.2022
Researchers study plants sprouting from century-old seeds uncovered during Toronto Port Lands excavation
Researchers study plants sprouting from century-old seeds uncovered during Toronto Port Lands excavation
At a Toronto Port Lands construction site on the city's waterfront, keen-eyed workers recently spotted plants that had sprouted from soil recently exposed by the removal of tonnes of earth. The plants were hard stem bulrush and cattails, which are commonly found in freshwater marshes. Because the plants grew from a patch of ground that had been seven metres below the surface for a century, conservationists concluded that they had grown from seeds buried when Ashbridges Bay Marsh at the mouth of the Don River was covered with landfill in the early 1900s.

Paleontology - 27.06.2022
Australopithecines in South Africa are older than previously thought
Australopithecus africanus individuals lived at least one million years earlier than previous dating indicated. This is the result from dating a cave deposit from the Sterkfontein site (South Africa), one of the richest in australopithecine remains, where the fossil of Mrs Ples, one of the first complete skulls of this kind of hominin, was discovered in 1947.

Astronomy / Space Science - Earth Sciences - 27.06.2022
Long-term liquid water also on non-Earth-like planets?
Long-term liquid water also on non-Earth-like planets?
Liquid water is an important prerequisite for life to develop on a planet. As researchers from the University of Bern, the University of Zurich and the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS report in a new study, liquid water could also exist for billions of years on planets that are very different from Earth.

Health - Pharmacology - 27.06.2022
Nitric Oxide Does Not Improve Babies' Recovery after Heart Surgery
Nitric Oxide Does Not Improve Babies’ Recovery after Heart Surgery
Infants undergoing heart surgery are connected to a heart-lung machine and given nitric oxide as an anti-inflammatory. Researchers from the Universities of Zurich and Queensland have now conducted the world's largest study of its kind, showing that using nitric oxide does not improve children's recovery after surgery.

Environment - History / Archeology - 27.06.2022
Ancient world adapted to climate change
A new study shows how the ancient world adapted to climate change A new study of the ancient world of Anatolia - now Turkey - shows how they adapted to climate change but offers a warning for today's climate emergency. The efforts of ancient populations to minimise the impacts of climate change were undermined during longer climate shifts when it is combined with other events such as pandemics, earthquakes and wars - findings the lead author says offer scary parallels to the modern day.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.06.2022
Top predators could ’trap’ themselves trying to adapt to climate change
As climate change alters environments across the globe, scientists have discovered that in response, many species are shifting the timing of major life events, such as reproduction. With an earlier spring thaw, for example, some flowers bloom sooner. But scientists don't know whether making these significant changes in life history will ultimately help a species survive or lead to bigger problems.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.06.2022
Liver can control the brain and behavior
A new Yale study found that the liver plays a major role in regulating feeding behavior in mice, a discovery that could have implications for people with eating disorders and metabolic diseases. The study, which was done in collaboration with colleagues in Germany, also adds to a growing body of evidence that shows the most advanced part of the brain, the cerebral cortex, is affected by the rest of the body, not just the other way around.

Environment - Astronomy / Space Science - 25.06.2022
Climate damage caused by growing space tourism needs urgent mitigation
Climate damage caused by growing space tourism needs urgent mitigation
A formidable space tourism industry may have a greater climate effect than the aviation industry and undo repair to the protective ozone layer if left unregulated, according to a new study led by UCL. Published today in the journal  Earth's Future , researchers from UCL, the University of Cambridge and Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) used a 3D model to explore the impact of rocket launches and re-entry in 2019, and the impact of projected space tourism scenarios based on the recent billionaire space race.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.06.2022
Mass spectrometry-based draft of the mouse proteome
Mass spectrometry-based draft of the mouse proteome
Proteins control and organize almost every aspect of life. The totality of all proteins in a living organism, a tissue or a cell is called the proteome. Using mass spectrometry, researchers at the TUM School of Life Sciences characterize the proteome, or protein complement of the genome, in important model organisms.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 24.06.2022
With Roommates, It’s All About Chemistry, Molecularly Speaking
A survey of life indoors reveals that resident humans and microbes adapt to each other Within and upon every human being reside countless microorganisms — the microbiota that help shape and direct the lives of their hosts. A similar phenomenon occurs between people, microbes and the homes they share.

Agronomy / Food Science - 24.06.2022
Intensive farming may actually reduce risk of pandemics, experts argue
Intensive farming may actually reduce risk of pandemics, experts argue
Scientists evaluate the evidence that intensive livestock farming is causing pandemics, and find that intensive farming could actually reduce the risk of future pandemics compared to 'free range' farming. Those calling for a move away from intensive farming often fail to consider the counterfactual Harriet Bartlett In the wake of COVID-19, many have pointed to modern industrial farms with tightly-packed livestock as potential hothouses for further pandemics caused by "zoonotic" diseases: those transmitted from animals to humans.

History / Archeology - 24.06.2022
Prehistoric stele found in the funerary complex of Cañaveral de León
Prehistoric stele found in the funerary complex of Cañaveral de León
An international research that integrates experts from the universities of Durham, Seville, Southampton, Huelva and Gothenburg has just located a prehistoric stela, of the type known as 'warrior' in the burial complex of Cañaveral de León (Huelva). This is the second stela found in this site.

Earth Sciences - Physics - 24.06.2022
Defects in quartz crystal structure reveal the origin of dust
Defects in quartz crystal structure reveal the origin of dust
Global warming and a progressively drier climate in many parts of the world are causing more dust storms. To predict how these storms are caused, researchers are looking into the past to understand where the dust came from, for how long, and over what distances it was transported. An international research team led by Dr. Aditi K. Dave and Professor Kathryn Fitzsimmons from the Department of Geosciences at the University of Tübingen, along with colleagues from Romania, Brazil, Kazakhstan and Tajikistan, have now developed a new method of doing this.

Physics - Materials Science - 24.06.2022
'Hot' graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
’Hot’ graphene reveals migration of carbon atoms
The migration of carbon atoms on the surface of the nanomaterial graphene was recently measured for the first time. Although the atoms move too swiftly to be directly observed with an electron microscope, their effect on the stability of the material can now be determined indirectly while the material is heated on a microscopic hot plate.