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Results 41 - 60 of 1792.


Education / Continuing Education - Pedagogy / Education Science - 13.06.2018
Where boys and girls do better in math, English
A review of test scores from 10,000 school district finds that gender gaps in math and English vary with community wealth and racial diversity. When Stanford Professor Sean Reardon and his research team set out to take an unprecedented look at how elementary school girls and boys compare in academic achievement, they expected to find similar stereotype-driven patterns across all 10,000 U.S. school districts: boys consistently outperforming girls in math and girls steadily surpassing boys in reading and writing by a wide margin.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 13.06.2018
Moderately high blood pressure at 50 linked to higher dementia risk
Moderately high blood pressure at 50 linked to higher dementia risk
50-year-olds who have blood pressure that is higher than normal but still below the threshold commonly used when deciding to treat the condition, are at increased risk of developing dementia in later life, finds a new study led by UCL and French National Institute of Health and Medical Research in Paris (INSERM) researchers.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 13.06.2018
How
How "Gatekeepers" to a Cell’s Nucleus Let Genetic Instructions Pass Through
Standing guard between a cell's nucleus and its main chamber, called the cytoplasm, are thousands of behemoth protein structures called nuclear pore complexes, or NPCs. NPCs are like the bouncers of a cell's nucleus, tightly guarding exactly what goes in and out. Each structure contains about 1,000 protein molecules, making NPCs some of the biggest protein complexes in our bodies.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.06.2018
Treating intestine with ’good’ cholesterol compound inhibits lung tumor growth in mice
FINDINGS A compound that mimics the main protein in high-density lipoprotein (HDL, or “good”) cholesterol significantly reduced the number of tumors in the lungs of mice, reports a team of UCLA researchers. The findings help explain the connection between HDL cholesterol and reduced cancer risk, and suggest that a similar compound may be an effective therapy in humans.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 13.06.2018
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to Scotland
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to Scotland
Large fenced reserves an effective way to bring wolves back to Scotland Research, led by the University of Sussex and the University of Kent, indicates that for wolves to be effective at directly reducing red deer numbers and allowing nature to recover in the Scottish Highlands they may need to be reintroduced to very large fenced reserve.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 13.06.2018
Test can identify patients in intensive care at greatest risk of life-threatening infections
Test can identify patients in intensive care at greatest risk of life-threatening infections
Patients in intensive care units are at significant risk of potentially life-threatening secondary infections, including from antibiotic-resistant bacteria such as MRSA and C. difficile. Now, a new test could identify those at greatest risk - and speed up the development of new therapies to help at-risk patients.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 13.06.2018
Interfacing With the Brain
New material improves brain-machine interfaces Chris Bettinger and his group have created a hydrogel material and fabrication process for electrodes that stick to the brain, matching its soft, squishy makeup in order to keep the body from rejecting electronic probes that measure neural signals. These probes could lead to a deeper understanding of processes such as thoughts, emotions or motor control, and could improve treatments for arthritis and medical procedures to the heart, brain and spinal cord.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 13.06.2018
Cities alter body size of animal communities
Introduction: A large and international team of ecologists reports in the renowned journal Nature that urbanization is driving body-size shifts in animal communities. Three authors of the Global Change Ecology Centre , Erik Matthysen , Lisa Baardsen and Thierry Backeljau (all belonging to the research group Evolutionary Ecology ), contributed to the study.

Life Sciences - 13.06.2018
Sociable animals will make compromises to remain with their group
Sociable animals will make compromises to remain with their group
Fish will forego their own temperature preferences in order to remain part of a group, according to a new study. The research, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, found that an individual fish was more likely to associate with a group of fish if they were located in waters closer to the individual's own preferred temperature.

Life Sciences - 13.06.2018
Conformity trumps riskiness in social fish
Conformity trumps riskiness in social fish
Researchers at the University of Bristol have discovered that more sociable fish suppress their own personality when they are with a partner. Fish, much like humans, exhibit a wide range of different personalities. Individuals vary in qualities such as how social they are and their willingness to take risk (boldness).

Environment / Sustainable Development - 13.06.2018
Sustainable certified palm oil scheme failing to achieve goals
There is little evidence that a certification scheme for palm oil plantations is improving protection of critically endangered orangutans in Borneo, researchers say. A study by The University of Queensland, the ARC Centre of Excellence for Environmental Decisions (CEED) and Borneo Futures found vague targets, concepts and terminology left too much to interpretation.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 13.06.2018
Brain secrets that flow in our blood
Brain secrets that flow in our blood
Our blood can be used to uncover genetic secrets inside the brain, according to University of Queensland research. A team led by Professor Jian Yang from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience and Queensland Brain Institute , and Dr Ting Qi from the Institute for Molecular Biosciences, discovered blood samples can be used to identify gene targets for brain-related traits like IQ and diseases such as schizophrenia.

Astronomy - Life Sciences - 12.06.2018
Gravity for the loss
Gravity for the loss
ESA Space in Images Space agencies of Europe, assemble! Last week, ESA, the German Aerospace Center (DLR) and French space agency CNES joined forces to run a special parabolic flight campaign entirely dedicated to life science experiments. Between 4 and 7 June, eight experiments were run in three different levels of partial gravity, another first for a parabolic flight campaign.

Medicine / Pharmacology - 12.06.2018
Composition of Complex Sugars in Breast Milk May Prevent Future Food Allergies
The unique composition of a mother's breastmilk may help to reduce food sensitization in her infant, report researchers at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine with colleagues in Canada. The findings, publishing in the June 15 issue of Allergy , further highlight the health role of human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs), which are not found in infant formula, and underscore their potential for therapeutic interventions.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 12.06.2018
Warmer climate will dramatically increase the volatility of global corn crops
New research examines how warmer temperatures will impact corn yields throughout the world. Photo credit: fishhawk/Flickr A new study co-authored by a Stanford Earth researcher looks at what climate change will mean for global yields of corn, or maize, the most widely grown crop in the world.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Careers / Employment - 12.06.2018
Research suggests Robert Burns may have had bipolar disorder
Research suggests Robert Burns may have had bipolar disorder
Researchers at the University of Glasgow suggest Robert Burns may have had bipolar disorder, according to a paper published in The Journal of the Royal College of Physicians of Edinburgh. More than 800 letters and journals have helped the academics to analyse the mental state of Robert Burns. The project also looked beyond Scotland's national bard's correspondence to his relationships and day-to-day life in a bid to establish if he had a psychiatric disorder.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 12.06.2018
New insights into the contribution of land ice to sea level rise
New insights into the contribution of land ice to sea level rise
A new study led by scientists from the University of Bristol has provided an up-to-date insight into the impact of melting land ice on sea levels. The new estimate shows there has been a six-fold increase in annual land ice contribution to global sea level rise from the mid-1990s to the early 2010s.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Psychology - 12.06.2018
New online tool for identifying emerging mental health problems in young people
New online tool for identifying emerging mental health problems in young people
For the first time, researchers have developed an online tool to help identify young people with emerging signs of mental health problems, such as psychosis. Nearly one third of the participants using the screening tool, which was created by researchers at the University of Glasgow's Institute of Neuroscience and Psychology, were found to be at risk for developing psychosis.

Pedagogy / Education Science - Medicine / Pharmacology - 12.06.2018
Mother's attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child's development
Mother’s attitude towards baby during pregnancy may have implications for child’s development
Mothers who 'connect' with their baby during pregnancy are more likely to interact in a more positive way with their infant after it is born, according to a study carried out at the University of Cambridge. Interaction is important for helping infants learn and develop. Although we found a relationship between a mother's attitude towards her baby during pregnancy and her later interactions, this link was only modest.

Careers / Employment - Business / Economics - 12.06.2018
All in a day's work
All in a day’s work
Researchers at the University of Cambridge are helping to understand the world of work - the good, the bad, the fair and the future. Here, Simon Deakin, Catherine Barnard and Brendan Burchell launch our month-long focus on some of these projects. Researchers do not initiate projects simply to overturn conventional wisdom, but this is often what they end up doing, simply because few of the ideas or practices which are 'taken for granted' in everyday discourse can safely withstand this type of scrutiny.