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Results 41 - 60 of 2111.


Materials Science - Physics - 07.06.2024
Researchers engineer new approach for controlling thermal emission
The University of Manchester's National Graphene Institute has spearheaded an international team to engineer a novel approach for controlling thermal emission, detailed in a paper published in Science . This breakthrough offers new design strategies beyond conventional materials, with promising implications for thermal management and camouflage technologies.

Health - Pharmacology - 07.06.2024
Major cause of inflammatory bowel disease discovered
UK researchers have discovered a new biological pathway which drives inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and could be targeted with existing drugs. The work, carried out by researchers at the Francis Crick Institute, working with UCL and Imperial College London, uncovered a region of DNA which effectively dials up the activity of specific white blood cells, driving inflammation and increasing IBD risk.

Health - Life Sciences - 07.06.2024
Inhibition of epigenetic control enzymes in immune cells as a potential new starting point in cancer immunotherapy
Immunotherapy is one of the pillars in the fight against cancer and aims to enable the body's own immune system to fight a tumor. A recent study now shows that removing certain enzymes that regulate epigenetic processes from the so-called dentritic cells of the immune system influences their development and thus improves anti-tumor immunity.

Life Sciences - Health - 07.06.2024
Cells that interpret an increase in nutrients accelerate ageing and shorten lifespan
Research shows that cells that interpret an increase in nutrients accelerate ageing and shorten lifespan Cells receive signals of an increase in nutrients, which leads to malfunction and inflammation in organs such as the pancreas, liver or kidneys. This is a discovery from the CNIO team and the Universitat de ValŔncia, published in Nature Aging .

Life Sciences - 07.06.2024
Dancers are less neurotic
Amateur and professional dancers are less neurotic than people who do not dance. A new study shows A study led by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Empirical Aesthetics in Frankfurt am Main, Germany, has shown that both amateur and professional dancers are less neurotic than people who do not dance.

Paleontology - Life Sciences - 07.06.2024
Second great ape species discovered at Hammerschmiede fossil site
Second great ape species discovered at Hammerschmiede fossil site
An international team of researchers has discovered a previously unknown ape species in the Hammerschmiede clay pit in southern Germany. Buronius manfredschmidi was found close to the great ape Danuvius guggenmosi , known as "Udo". This was about 12 million years ago the first ape with adaptations for walking upright and made the Hammerschmiede excavation site famous.

Media - 07.06.2024
Alcohol ads flood young people’s social media
Young Australians are being exposed to an alcohol advertisement on social media every 2 minutes and 43 seconds on average, according to University of Queensland research. PhD candidate Brienna Rutherford from UQ's National Centre for Youth Substance Use Research examined the social media accounts of 125 university students aged 17 to 25, and found they had been exposed to almost 800 alcohol advertisements.

Psychology - Economics - 07.06.2024
Making a strategic decision? Let visuals help you
Study: External representations in strategic decision-making: Understanding strategy's reliance on visuals Management consultants and professors seem to be obsessed with visuals. When it comes to strategy, they either pull out their impeccable slides, replete with graphics ranging from a SWOT analysis to Porter's Five Forces to the Strategy Canvas, or they pick up a marker to sketch out their own frameworks on a whiteboard.

Health - 06.06.2024
Researchers identify key differences in inner workings of immune cells
Researchers identify key differences in inner workings of immune cells
Using machine-learning methods, researchers at ETH Zurich have shown that more than half of all killer T cells exhibit nuclear invaginations, or folds in the cell's nuclear envelope. Thanks to this particular cellular architecture, such cells are able to mount a faster and stronger response to pathogens.

Astronomy / Space - Physics - 06.06.2024
Searching for Signals from the Early Universe
In the search for signals from the early universe, the Heidelberg scientist Georg Wolschin deals with the question of whether and how residual spectral lines from the recombination phase with the formation of the first elements can be detected in the cosmic background radiation - which can be measured very precisely today.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Boosting key protein in eye cells could prevent age-related vision loss
Boosting key protein in eye cells could prevent age-related vision loss
Increasing the levels of a key protein in the cells at the back of the eye could help protect against the leading cause of vision loss among older adults, finds a new study co-led by a UCL researcher. The findings from an international team based in the UK, US, Germany and Australia are published in Science Translational Medicine .

Environment - Life Sciences - 06.06.2024
Analysis: A new AI tool to help monitor coral reef health
Analysis: A new AI tool to help monitor coral reef health
PhD candidate Ben Williams (UCL Centre for Biodiversity and Environment Research and ZSL's Institute of Zoology) writes with a colleague about why they built SurfPerch, an AI led system to make it faster and easier for marine scientists to answer ecological questions. Coral reefs cover only 0.1% of the ocean's surface - yet they host 25% of all known marine species.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.06.2024
Major cause of inflammatory bowel disease discovered
Major cause of inflammatory bowel disease discovered
A new biological pathway that is a principal driver of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and related conditions, and which can be targeted using existing drugs, has been discovered by researchers at UCL, the Francis Crick Institute and Imperial College London. About 5% of the world's population, and one in ten people in the UK, are currently affected by an autoimmune disease, such as IBD, the umbrella term for Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis, which cause swelling and irritation of the digestive tract.

Astronomy / Space - 06.06.2024
Earliest detection of metal challenges what we know about the first galaxies
Earliest detection of metal challenges what we know about the first galaxies
Astronomers have detected carbon in a galaxy just 350 million years after the Big Bang, the earliest detection of any element in the universe other than hydrogen. Using the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST), an international team of astronomers led by the University of Cambridge observed a very young galaxy in the early universe and found that it contained surprising amounts of carbon, one of the seeds of life as we know it.

Social Sciences - 06.06.2024
Inclusive integration policy can reduce perception of diversity as a threat
Increasing ethnic and racial diversity in Western societies often accompanies feelings of threat among the ethnic majorities of a country. New research from Tilburg University shows that an inclusive integration policy can reduce the perception of diversity as a threat. The research suggests that policies that give immigrants more equal rights are particularly effective in promoting social cohesion and reducing tensions in Western societies.

Media - 06.06.2024
How long will the African population continue to grow?
According to the United Nations (UN) population projections, the population of Africa will continue to grow strongly in the course of this century, while on other continents population growth will decline in the near future. New research by Jeroen Smits from Radboud University and Lamar Crombach from ETH Zurich suggests that population growth in Africa might slow down faster than predicted by these projections.

Physics - Chemistry - 06.06.2024
TU Graz Revolutionises Simulation of Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs)
TU Graz Revolutionises Simulation of Metal-Organic Frameworks (MOFs)
Due to the complex structures of microporous crystals known as MOFs, reliable simulations of their properties have been difficult until now. Machine learning provides the solution. Hydrogen storage, heat conduction, gas storage, CO2 and water sequestration - metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have extraordinary properties due to their unique structure in the form of microporous crystals, which have a very large surface area despite their small size.

Health - 06.06.2024
Breakthrough research highlights Imperial’s strength in cardiovascular science
Three Imperial-led conference presentations have highlighted the university as a leader in cutting-edge cardiovascular disease research. New research from scientists at Imperial College London could help to advance treatment and care for patients with heart conditions. The work, funded by the British Heart Foundation (BHF), covers areas including the use of artificial intelligence to diagnose heart attacks, remote monitoring of high-risk patients, and highlighting increased heart disease risk for British South Asians.

Physics - Materials Science - 06.06.2024
First chip-based 3D printer
First chip-based 3D printer
Smaller than a coin, this optical device could enable rapid prototyping on the go. Imagine a portable 3D printer you could hold in the palm of your hand. The tiny device could enable a user to rapidly create customized, low-cost objects on the go, like a fastener to repair a wobbly bicycle wheel or a component for a critical medical operation.

Career - 06.06.2024
Report proposes new rights to protect workers from 'unfair, unaccountable and uncaring' algorithms
Report proposes new rights to protect workers from ’unfair, unaccountable and uncaring’ algorithms
A report published today [6 June] calls for a new generation of rights to protect workers from the rise of 'management by algorithm'. The report published by the Institute of Employment Rights says that algorithmic management threatens to degrade workers' rights and conditions and that current protections in the law are inadequate in the face of technological change.