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Environment/Sustainable Development
16.02.2018
Arctic worming?
In North America, the spread of European earthworms is a known environmental issue as it has turned out that some of these species are capable of altering entire forest ecosystems. In Sweden, we have so far had a positive approach to earthworms and no policies have been put in place to limit the spread of these worms in Swedish national parks.
Medicine/Pharmacology
16.02.2018
Novartis new data show Cosentyx improved quality of life over 5 years in two thirds of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis
Novartis new data show Cosentyx improved quality of life over 5 years in two thirds of patients with moderate to severe plaque psoriasis
Two thirds of patients on Cosentyx (secukinumab) reported no impact of skin disease on their quality of life over 5 years, SCULPTURE study shows Findings show absolute PASI <=1/<=2/<=3 responses were sustained in those treated with Cosentyx from Year 1 to Year 5 Cosentyx is the first and only fully human interleukin-17A (IL-17A) inhibitor that showed sustained skin clearance rates at 5 years in patients from a psoriasis Phase III st
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
15.02.2018
UCL cancer trials to get £9m funding boost
UCL cancer trials to get £9m funding boost
Cancer Research UK is planning to invest nearly 9m over the next five years into research at the Cancer Research UK & UCL Cancer Trials Centre. The announcement is part of a 45 million investment into Cancer Research UK's network of clinical trials units across the UK, one of the charity's largest investments in clinical research to date.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
Secrets behind the cuttlefish's 3D 'invisibility cloak'
Secrets behind the cuttlefish’s 3D ’invisibility cloak’
An international team of scientists has identified the neural circuits that enable cuttlefish to change their appearance in just the blink to eye - and discovered that this is similar to the neural circuit that controls iridescence in squids. The sea is full of strange and wondrous creatures, but there are few as bizarre and intelligent as octopuses and cuttlefish.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
CRISPR scissors, Cas12a, enables cutting-edge diagnostics
CRISPR-Cas12a, one of the DNA-cutting proteins revolutionizing biology today, has an unexpected side effect that makes it an ideal enzyme for simple, rapid and accurate disease diagnostics. Cas12a, discovered in 2015 and originally called Cpf1, is like the well-known Cas9 protein that UC Berkeley's Jennifer Doudna and colleague Emmanuelle Charpentier turned into a powerful gene-editing tool in 2012.
Earth Sciences - Life Sciences
15.02.2018
Scientists shed light on Burgess Shale preservation for first time
The fossil Waptia from the Burgess Shale, Canada. New Oxford University research suggests that the mineralogy of the surrounding earth is key to conserving soft parts of organisms, and finding more exceptional fossils like the Waptia. Image credit: Yale University Fossils that preserve entire organisms (including both hard and soft body parts) are critical to our understanding of evolution and ancient life on Earth.
Art and Design - Social Sciences
15.02.2018
Play it again: People find comfort listening to the same songs over and over
ANN ARBOR-With the frequency that some people play their favorite song, it's a good thing vinyl records aren't used often because they might wear out. University of Michigan researchers have found that people enjoy replaying a favorite song many times even after the novelty and surprise are gone. In a new study, participants reported listening to their favorite song hundreds of times.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
Amyloid protein transmission through neurosurgery
Amyloid protein transmission through neurosurgery
Amyloid beta pathology - protein deposits in the brain - might have been transmitted by contaminated neurosurgical instruments, suggests a new UCL-led study. For the paper, published today in Acta Neuropathologica , researchers studied the medical records of four people who had brain bleeds caused by amyloid beta build-up in the blood vessels of the brain.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
15.02.2018
Physicists create new form of light
Physicists create new form of light
Try a quick experiment: Take two flashlights into a dark room and shine them so that their light beams cross. Notice anything peculiar? The rather anticlimactic answer is, probably not. That's because the individual photons that make up light do not interact. Instead, they simply pass each other by, like indifferent spirits in the night.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
Researchers advance CRISPR-based tool for diagnosing disease
Researchers advance CRISPR-based tool for diagnosing disease
The team that first unveiled the rapid, inexpensive, highly sensitive CRISPR-based diagnostic tool called SHERLOCK has greatly enhanced the tool's power, and has developed a miniature paper test that allows results to be seen with the naked eye - without the need for expensive equipment. The SHERLOCK team developed a simple paper strip to display test results for a single genetic signature, borrowing from the visual cues common in pregnancy tests.
Business/Economics
15.02.2018
Artificial intelligence can help you protect your personal data
Artificial intelligence can help you protect your personal data
It's a safe bet that some of the websites and apps you use collect and subsequently sell your personal data.
Physics/Materials Science - Art and Design
15.02.2018
Sinfonia ai funghi
Sinfonia ai funghi
Do violins made of wood that had been treated with fungi sound the same as a fine, antique instrument? Acoustics experts at Empa are currently studying the body and soul of instruments made of "mycowood". Precision structure-borne sound measurements and psycho-acoustic tests with volunteers should reveal whether a fungal treatment can really improve an instrument.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
Study suggests expanded range for emerging tick-borne disease
Human cases of Borrelia miyamotoi , a tick-borne infection with some similarities to Lyme disease, were discovered in the eastern United States less than a decade ago. Now new research led by the Yale School of Public Health strongly suggests that the pathogen's geographic range is bicoastal, far larger than previously believed.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
15.02.2018
Improving Health of Children in Nigeria
To improve diagnosis and treatment of children under five, Swiss TPH together with the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) developed the electronic decision support tool ALMANACH.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.02.2018
Fast-acting, readily available gas may mitigate blast-induced brain injury
Treatment with xenon gas after blast reduces blast-induced brain injury, suggests an early-stage study using mouse brain tissue. The inert gas has been used for the first time to try and reduce the impact of traumatic brain injuries (TBI) caused by blasts such as those in conflict zones and terror attacks.
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
15.02.2018
Fingerprints of quantum entanglement
Fingerprints of quantum entanglement
Quantum entanglement is a key feature of a quantum computer. Yet, how can we verify that a quantum computer indeed incorporates a large-scale entanglement? Using conventional methods is hard since they require a large number of repeated measurements. Aleksandra Dimić from the University of Belgrade and Borivoje Dakić from the Austrian Academy of Sciences and the University of Vienna have developed a novel method where in many cases even a single experimental run suffices to prove the presence of entanglement.
Environment/Sustainable Development
15.02.2018
UK fracking industry would need strict controls to minimise spill risk
UK fracking industry would need strict controls to minimise spill risk
UK fracking industry would need strict controls to minimise spill risk (15 February 2018) Strict controls would be “a necessity” to minimise the risk of spills and leaks from any future UK shale gas industry, according to new research. The recommendation comes from scientists who have investigated the possible risk of spills from well sites and tankers used to transport chemicals and contaminated fluids to and from fracking sites.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
14.02.2018
Novel exciton interactions in carbon nanotubes
Novel exciton interactions in carbon nanotubes
In the study, a collaborative research team showed that Raman spectroscopy (a form of light scattering) can provide more extensive characterization of intertube excitons. Observing this behavior in carbon nanotubes suggests there is potential to detect and control a similar response in more complex, multi-layered semiconductor and semiconductor-metal heterostructures.
Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
14.02.2018
Acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent aircraft accidents
Acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent aircraft accidents
Pitots, which provide airspeed data, have played a role in several aircraft accidents, including the fatal Air France Flight 447 in 2009. New research by aerospace engineers at the University of Bristol has found that an acoustic blockage-detection system could prevent future accidents by making pilots aware of a blocked Pitot before a situation becomes critical.