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Results 41 - 60 of 2072.


Life Sciences - Astronomy / Space Science - 04.12.2018
Scientist looks to space for possible treatment of some neurological diseases
Scientist looks to space for possible treatment of some neurological diseases
An experiment on the latest SpaceX launch will measure how microgravity affects the brain UCLA Health Sciences Media Relations Do astronauts' brains get bigger in space? The answer may be found in 10 small containers of human brain cells on board a SpaceX spacecraft that is scheduled for blast off Dec.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 04.12.2018
Galileo satellites prove Einstein's Relativity Theory to highest accuracy yet
Galileo satellites prove Einstein’s Relativity Theory to highest accuracy yet
ESA Navigation EGNOS Galileo Evolution NAVISP 4 December 2018 Europe's Galileo satellite navigation system - already serving users globally - has now provided a historic service to the physics community worldwide, enabling the most accurate measurement ever made of how shifts in gravity alter the passing of time, a key element of Einstein's Theory of General Relativity.

Business / Economics - 04.12.2018
Increasing Crop Insurances Adoption in Developing Countries
Increasing Crop Insurances Adoption in Developing Countries
Farmers in developing countries often rely heavily on their yearly harvest to feed their families. A bad crop can have severe consequences for their livelihood. Despite the significant advantages crop insurances would offer in alleviating this risk, only a small percentage of farmers insure their crops.

Life Sciences - 04.12.2018
Marmoset study gives insights into loss of pleasure in depression
Marmoset study gives insights into loss of pleasure in depression
'Anhedonia' (the loss of pleasure) is one of the key symptoms of depression. An important component of this symptom is an inability to feel excitement in anticipation of events; however the brain mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.12.2018
Study counts the high cost of infidelity for swift parrots
Study counts the high cost of infidelity for swift parrots
Scientists at ANU have found a chronic shortage of females in a critically endangered parrot species has led to love triangles, sneaky sex on the side, increased fighting between males and fewer babies. The ratio of males to females among swift parrots was once roughly equal but it has increased over time to almost three to one, since the introduction of a tiny predator to Tasmania in the 1800s - the sugar glider.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.12.2018
Learning from Mistakes
Everyone makes little everyday mistakes out of habit-a waiter says, "Enjoy your meal," and you respond with, "You, too!" before realizing that the person is not, in fact, going to be enjoying your meal. Luckily, there are parts of our brains that monitor our behavior, catching errors and correcting them quickly. A Caltech-led team of researchers has now identified the individual neurons that may underlie this ability.

Earth Sciences - 04.12.2018
Volcanoes fed by ’mush’ reservoirs rather than molten magma chambers
Volcanoes are not fed by molten magma formed in large chambers finds a new study, overturning classic ideas about volcanic eruptions. Instead, the study suggests that volcanoes are fed by so-called ‘mush reservoirs' - areas of mostly solid crystals with magma in the small spaces between the crystals.

Environment - 04.12.2018
Monitoring climate change from space
Monitoring climate change from space
ESA Observing the Earth Space for our climate ESA > Our Activities > Observing the Earth > Space for our climate 4 December 2018 Rising global temperatures and the effects of climate change are huge and environmental challenges. Satellites provide unequivocal evidence of the changes taking place and provide decision-makers with the information they need to address these complicated issues - as demonstrated in efforts underway at the COP24 summit in Poland.

Health - 04.12.2018
What are the cost-effective implants in hip replacement surgery?
What are the cost-effective implants in hip replacement surgery?
New research led by the Hip Implant Prosthesis Study (HIPS) team at the University of Bristol Medical School has shown that small-head (less than 36 mm in diameter) cemented metal-on-plastic hip replacements are the most cost-effective in men and women older than 65 years. For adults younger than 65, small-head cemented ceramic-on-plastic hip replacements are more likely to be cost-effective.

Social Sciences - 04.12.2018
Social marketing campaigns can help threatened wildlife species recover
Social marketing campaigns can help threatened wildlife species recover
Encouraging people to change their behavior through social marketing campaigns can help the recovery of threatened wildlife populations. New research shows that social marketing campaigns play an important role in the recovery of wildlife species, offering evidence that can help conservationists design more cost-effective future campaigns.

Environment - 04.12.2018
Forget ’needle in a haystack.’ Try finding an invasive species in a lake
For News Media FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE × Spiny water fleas are a type of zooplankton that travel in swarms and are pushed around by wind and currents. They are present in the greatest numbers in Lake Mendota in the fall. Jake Walsh When the tiny and invasive spiny water flea began appearing in University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers' nets in 2009, scientists began to wonder how Lake Mendota, one of the most-studied lakes in the world, went from flea-free to infested seemingly overnight.

Sport Sciences - 04.12.2018
The Science of Team Sports
The Science of Team Sports
Joint successes in the past increase the chances of winning. This has now been statistically proven in a variety of different team sports. What makes a team successful? This is not only a crucial question for football coaches, it plays a role in almost all areas of life, from corporate management to politics.

Innovation / Technology - Transport - 04.12.2018
New passenger scanner uses space technology to speed up airport security
A super-sensitive passenger scanner that reveals hidden security threats is being trialled at Cardiff Airport in the UK. The walk-through scanner, which uses space technology to image human body heat, is the result of a collaboration between Sequestim Ltd. and Cardiff University scientists. Computer learning allows the scanner to distinguish between threats and non-threats but without the need for passengers to keep still or remove outer clothing.

Pharmacology - Administration - 04.12.2018
Researchers force breakthrough in the administration of natural painkillers
Charlotte Martin and Steven Ballet of the VUB Research Group of Organic Chemistry have succeeded in developing an injectable hydrogel that can be used to administer natural painkillers in a minimally invasive manner. The hydrogel is broken down naturally in the body and has a pain-relieving effect of 3 to 4 days.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.12.2018
Stentrode developed for brain treatments without major surgery
Stentrode developed for brain treatments without major surgery
Australian researchers have developed a tiny device that electrically stimulates the brain and could one day be used to treat conditions such as epilepsy and Parkinson's disease without invasive surgery. They have shown for the first time that electrical stimulation can be delivered into the brain from a 4 mm diameter Stentrode permanently implanted inside a blood vessel.

Environment - Life Sciences - 04.12.2018
Clue to ecosystem recovery after pollution
Scientists have discovered a fish species which significantly evolved and expanded its ecological toolset, after an effort was made to reduce pollution in its ecosystem. The study, led by the University of Glasgow and the University of Konstanz and published in Nature Ecology and Evolution , found that the gangfisch - a European whitefish subspecies - expanded its genetic diversity after habitat loss and hybridization with other whitefish subspecies during eutrophication.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.12.2018
Soil bacteria provide a promising E. coli treatment
E. coli , the notorious bug associated with severe food poisoning and usually caught from undercooked meat, is a common concern for anyone cooking over the festive period. While thoroughly cooking meat and washing vegetables and hands after food preparation can prevent E. coli infection, treatment for the severe stomach bug can be difficult, as antibiotics are known to make the disease worse by releasing a potent toxin into the infected person's gut.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.12.2018
Requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse
Women who experience domestic violence and abuse (DVA) are more than twice as likely to seek emergency contraception as other women, according to a study by National Institute for Health Research (NIHR)-funded researchers at the University of Bristol and Queen Mary University of London, suggesting that requests for emergency contraception could be an important sign of abuse.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.12.2018
Are scientists studying the wrong kind of mice?
Mice represent well over half of the non-human subjects of biomedical research, and the vast majority of those mice are inbred. Formed by generation after generation of mating between brothers and sisters, inbred mice are genetically identical to each other, like twins or clones. Inbreeding is well known to reduce health and vigor across species; this biological fact is the reason that incest is a universal taboo.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.12.2018
Nature's 'laboratory' offers clues on how plants thrive through genetic diversity
PA 253/18 Scientists have turned to nature's own ‘laboratory' for clues about how plants adapt in the environment to ensure their own survival. A study led by researchers at The University of Nottingham has suggested that while plants evolve to adapt to their conditions, they also maintain a small degree of diversity to stay one step ahead of changing conditions.