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Results 41 - 60 of 1901.


Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 21.05.2020
Sex bias in pain research
It is increasingly clear that male and female humans and rodents process pain in different ways. And that there are important differences in the underlying mechanisms involved at genetic, molecular, cellular, and physiological levels. Despite this fact, according to a review paper from McGill University published today , most pain research remains overwhelmingly based on the study of male rodents, continuing to test hypotheses derived from earlier experiments on males.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 20.05.2020
Team of Canadian and Italian researchers breaking new ground in materials science
A study by a team of researchers from Canada and Italy recently published could usher in a revolutionary development in materials science, leading to big changes in the way companies create modern electronics. The goal was to develop two-dimensional materials, which are a single atomic layer thick, with added functionality to extend the revolutionary developments in materials science that started with the discovery of graphene in 2004.

Life Sciences - Physics - 20.05.2020
Elucidating the mechanism of a light-driven sodium pump
Elucidating the mechanism of a light-driven sodium pump
Researchers at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI have succeeded for the first time in recording, in action, a light-driven sodium pump from bacterial cells. †The findings promise progress in the development of new methods in neurobiology. The researchers used the new X-ray free-electron laser SwissFEL for their investigations.

Physics - Life Sciences - 20.05.2020
How cosmic rays may have shaped life
How cosmic rays may have shaped life
Physicists propose that the influence of cosmic rays on early life may explain nature's preference for a uniform "handedness" among biology's critical molecules. Before there were animals, bacteria or even DNA on Earth, self-replicating molecules were slowly evolving their way from simple matter to life beneath a constant shower of energetic particles from space.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 20.05.2020
New way to reverse symptoms of Fragile X
New way to reverse symptoms of Fragile X
Drug compound, tested in mice, could be effective in treating the leading heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism. MIT scientists have identified a potential new strategy for treating Fragile X syndrome, a disorder that is the leading heritable cause of intellectual disability and autism.

Physics - Computer Science - 20.05.2020
Quantum leap: Bristol's photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
Quantum leap: Bristol’s photon discovery is a major step toward large-scale quantum technologies
The development of quantum technologies promises to have a profound impact across science, engineering and society. Quantum computers at scale will be able to solve problems intractable on even the most powerful current supercomputers, with many revolutionary applications, for example, in the design of new drugs and materials.

Life Sciences - Environment - 20.05.2020
Towable sensor free-falls to measure vertical slices of ocean conditions
Towable sensor free-falls to measure vertical slices of ocean conditions
The motion of the ocean is often thought of in horizontal terms, for instance in the powerful currents that sweep around the planet, or the waves that ride in and out along a coastline. But there is also plenty of vertical motion, particularly in the open seas, where water from the deep can rise up, bringing nutrients to the upper ocean, while surface waters sink, sending dead organisms, along with oxygen and carbon, to the deep interior.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.05.2020
Scientists alter genes of innate immune cells with DNA-snipping tool
A UCLA research team has successfully used the powerful gene-editing tool known as CRISPR-Cas9 to alter the DNA of mature innate immune cells, some of the body's first responders to infections. These blood cells have been notoriously difficult to genetically engineer in the past. While the work was carried out in mice, the ability to modify the gene expression of these cells could one day allow clinicians to better harness the power of the immune system in the fight against cancer and autoimmune disease.

Health - Social Sciences - 20.05.2020
Most young people with increased suicide risk only display 'mild to moderate' mental distress - study
Most young people with increased suicide risk only display ’mild to moderate’ mental distress - study
Around 70% of young people who report self-harming or suicidal thoughts are within normal or non-clinical range of mental distress.†† Even modest improvements in mental health and wellbeing across the entire population may prevent more suicides than targeting only those who are severely depressed or anxious Peter Jones The vast majority of young people who self-harm or experience suicidal thoughts appear to have only mild or moderate mental distress, instead of more obvious symptoms associated with a diagnosable disorder, according to a new study.

Health - Social Sciences - 20.05.2020
Dynamic measures against the coronavirus examined
An alternating cycle of suppression interventions and relaxation could offer a pragmatic strategy - particularly for developing countries - to prevent health systems from being overloaded while reducing the economical and societal burden. The coronavirus pandemic has imposed an unprecedented challenge to global healthcare systems, societies and governments.

Life Sciences - 20.05.2020
How mixed messages complicate mate selection
The cacophony of early spring sounds - especially near ponds - is hard to miss. One frequent contributor are Cope's gray tree frogs. The males sing with the hope that a female decides to mate with them.† However, not all are equally adept at carrying a consistent tune. "Female tree frogs estimate a male's average call rate over a period of time.

Life Sciences - Computer Science - 20.05.2020
Complex data workflows contribute to reproducibility crisis
Markedly different conclusions about brain scans reached by 70 independent teams highlight the challenges to data analysis in the modern era of mammoth datasets and highly flexible processing workflows. Scientific research has changed dramatically in the centuries since Galileo, Newton and Darwin. Whereas scientists once often toiled in isolation with homemade experiments and treatises, today collaboration is the norm.

Materials Science - Physics - 20.05.2020
Machine-learning tool could help develop tougher materials
Machine-learning tool could help develop tougher materials
Engineers develop a rapid screening system to test fracture resistance in billions of potential materials. For engineers developing new materials or protective coatings, there are billions of different possibilities to sort through. Lab tests or even detailed computer simulations to determine their exact properties, such as toughness, can take hours, days, or more for each variation.

Health - Environment - 20.05.2020
Using Machine Learning to Estimate COVID-19's Seasonal Cycle
Using Machine Learning to Estimate COVID-19’s Seasonal Cycle
One of the many unanswered scientific questions about COVID-19 is whether it is seasonal like the flu - waning in warm summer months then resurging in the fall and winter. Now scientists at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) are launching a project to apply machine-learning methods to a plethora of health and environmental datasets, combined with high-resolution climate models and seasonal forecasts, to tease out the answer.

Architecture - 20.05.2020
How organic architecture can shape dense, diverse cityscapes
How organic architecture can shape dense, diverse cityscapes
In a new book, researchers from EPFL examine the history of organic architecture, complete with telling examples of the genre, from its emergence in the early 20th century to the present day.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 20.05.2020
Ancient giant armoured fish fed in a similar way to basking sharks
Ancient giant armoured fish fed in a similar way to basking sharks
Scientists from the University of Bristol and the University of Zurich have shown that the Titanichthys - a giant armoured fish that lived in the seas and oceans of the late Devonian period 380-million-years ago - fed in a similar manner to modern day basking sharks. Titanichthys has long been known as one of the largest animals of the Devonian - its exact size is difficult to determine, but it likely exceeded five metres in length; like in the basking shark, its lower jaw reached lengths exceeding one metre.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.05.2020
COVID-19: could saliva tests replace nasal swabs?
COVID-19: could saliva tests replace nasal swabs?
Saliva could be humanity's best friend in fighting the COVID-19 pandemic, University of Queensland researchers have found. Dr Pingping Han , a postdoctoral research fellow in UQ's School of Dentistry , said saliva can be used to diagnose the presence and transmission of COVID-19, and to monitor immunity to the virus.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 20.05.2020
Prehistoric Giant Fish Was a Suspension Feeder
Prehistoric Giant Fish Was a Suspension Feeder
Scientists from the University of Zurich and the University of Bristol have investigated the jaw mechanics of Titanichthys, a giant armored fish that roamed the seas and oceans of the late Devonian period 380 million years ago. New findings suggest that it fed by swimming through water slowly with its mouth open wide to capture high concentrations of plankton - similar to modern-day basking sharks.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.05.2020
Evidence of link between diesel exhaust, risk of Parkinson’s
A new UCLA study in zebrafish has identifie d the process by which air pollution can damage brain cells, potentially contributing to Parkinson's disease. Published in the peer-reviewed journal Toxicological Sciences , the findings show that chemicals in diesel exhaust can trigger the toxic buildup of a protein in the brain called alpha-synuclein, which is commonly seen in people with the disease.

Health - 19.05.2020
Walking or cycling to work associated with reduced risk of early death
People who walk, cycle and travel by train to work are at reduced risk of early death or illness compared with those who commute by car. These are the findings of a study of over 300,000 commuters in England and Wales, by researchers from Imperial College London and the University of Cambridge.

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