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Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.09.2017
Blood testing via sound waves may replace some tissue biopsies
Blood testing via sound waves may replace some tissue biopsies
Cells secrete nanoscale packets called exosomes that carry important messages from one part of the body to another. Scientists from MIT and other institutions have now devised a way to intercept these messages, which could be used to diagnose problems such as cancer or fetal abnormalities. Their new device uses a combination of microfluidics and sound waves to isolate these exosomes from blood.
Life Sciences
18.09.2017
Eyes that lie: protective deception of eyespots confirmed
Eyes that lie: protective deception of eyespots confirmed
The widespread occurrence of eyespots, from butterflies to fish, has intrigued biologists for years but the mechanism behind their function has, until now, remained unclear. New evidence published recently in The American Naturalist shows that prey eyespots intimidate predators because they associate the eyelike appearance of eyespots with the threat posed by their own enemy.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.09.2017
Cells programmed like computers to fight disease
Cells can be programmed like a computer to fight cancer, influenza and other serious health conditions - breakthrough research by University of Warwick Common molecule found in humans, plants and animals can be genetically engineered into sequences - like computer code in software - to control actions of a cell Different sequences could be tailor-made to target diverse diseases or injuries - like unique apps ‘downloaded' into cells for spe
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
18.09.2017
A new approach to high insulin levels
A new approach to high insulin levels
Congenital hyperinsulinism is a serious yet poorly understood condition. Research funded by the SNSF has discovered how it is caused by a genetic mutation. Diabetes is characterised by a deficiency of insulin. The opposite is the case in congenital hyperinsulinism: patients produce the hormone too frequently and in excessive quantities, even if they haven't eaten any carbohydrates.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
18.09.2017
Li Ka Shing Foundation donates US$3m for precision oncology
The Li Ka Shing Foundation will donate US$3 million (A$3.75 million) to a team of University of Melbourne researchers, based at the the University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research (UMCCR) and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre, working to turn cancer into a manageable chronic disease.   The donation to the UMCCR will help accelerate the pace of discovery and increase the existing global body of knowledge used to diagnose and treat cancer.
Psychology
18.09.2017
Teenage aggression linked to neglect
Nearly half of all teenagers investigated for neglect by Ontario's child welfare agencies and exhibiting signs of aggression are abandoned by their parents. This is because the parents are not willing or able to remain the primary caregivers for their adolescents. This startling finding comes from one of the first large-scale studies of Canadian data on maltreatment and aggressive behaviour in children and youth.
Psychology - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2017
Treating insomnia may reduce mental health problems
Treating insomnia may reduce mental health problems
Treating insomnia with online cognitive behavioural therapy (CBT) could reduce mental health problems such as anxiety, depression, and paranoia, according to research. The study found that sleep disruption is a driving factor in the occurrence of paranoia, hallucinatory experiences, and other mental health problems in young adults with an average age of 25.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
15.09.2017
'Mysterious' ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
’Mysterious’ ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
It lived well over 550 million years ago, is known only through fossils and has variously been described as looking a bit like a jellyfish, a worm, a fungus and lichen. But was the 'mysterious' Dickinsonia an animal, or was it something else? Recent findings suggest animals had evolved several million years before the 'Cambrian Explosion' that has been the focus of attention for studies into animal evolution for so long.
Life Sciences
15.09.2017
How Blood Vessels Are Formed
New insights into the development of the vascular system: researchers in the team of Dr Carmen Ruiz de Almodóvar of the Heidelberg University Biochemistry Center have discovered a crucial biological step that regulates the formation of blood vessels. They were able to show that the proteins YAP and TAZ play an important role in this process.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2017
Life Expectancy Increases in Switzerland
Life Expectancy Increases in Switzerland
Countries have saved more lives over the past decade according to the annual Global Burden of Diseases (GBD) study published yesterday. In Switzerland, life expectancy has increased to 85 years for women and to 81 years for men. The Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute contributed to the GDB, the world's largest scientific collaboration on population health.
Life Sciences
15.09.2017
Happiness is not determined by childhood biomarkers
Happiness is not determined by childhood biomarkers
Happiness is not determined by childhood biological markers such as height or body fat, according to a team of European researchers involving UCL.  The paper, published in PLoS ONE analysed longitudinal data from nearly 2000 young Finns over a period of 20 years. For the first time, researchers obtained measurements for biomarkers in childhood together with measures of happiness in adulthood.
Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2017
Transgender Youths Vulnerable to Threats
AUSTIN, Texas - In two peer-reviewed papers, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that transgender adolescents are twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts as the general population, and they are up to four times as likely to engage in substance use. Depression and school-based victimization factored heavily into the disparities in both cases.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
15.09.2017
Why Poison Frogs Don't Poison Themselves
Why Poison Frogs Don’t Poison Themselves
The phantasmal poison frog, Epipedobates anthonyi, is the original source of epibatidine, discovered by John Daly in 1974. Epibatidine has not been found in any animal outside of Ecuador, and its ultimate source, proposed to be an arthropod, remains unknown. This frog was captured at a banana plantation in the Azuay province in southern Ecuador in August 2017.
Life Sciences - Earth Sciences
14.09.2017
’Mysterious’ ancient creature was definitely an animal, research confirms
It lived well over 550 million years ago, is known only through fossils and has variously been described as looking a bit like a jellyfish, a worm, a fungus and lichen. But was the 'mysterious' Dickinsonia an animal, or was it something else? A new study by researchers at the universities of Oxford, Cambridge, Bristol, and the British Geological Survey provides strong proof that Dickinsonia was an animal, confirming recent findings suggesting that animals evolved millions of years before the so-called Cambrian Explosion of animal life.
Chemistry - Life Sciences
14.09.2017
New way to speed up chemical reactions
New way to speed up chemical reactions
A team of scientists and engineers from UCLA and Japan's University of Shizuoka has discovered a new mode of enzyme catalysis, the process that speeds up chemical reactions. The researchers also demonstrated that the enzyme, called LepI, can catalyze reactions that were not previously observed in nature.
Astronomy - Physics/Materials Science
14.09.2017
Bidding farewell to Cassini mission that explored Saturn
Bidding farewell to Cassini mission that explored Saturn
"It's an extraordinarily difficult mission, but one with extraordinary rewards: giving us a glimpse into how our solar system formed and how it operates today. Watching a mission come to an end is always bittersweet, but we're proud to have been a part of something so successful that will continue to inform our understanding of our universe." Los Alamos National Laboratory played part in two major discoveries and powered the spacecraft during its 20-year flight Los Alamos, N.M., Sept.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
14.09.2017
Unexpected facets of Antarctica emerge from the labs
Unexpected facets of Antarctica emerge from the labs
Six months after the Antarctic Circumnavigation Expedition ended, the teams that ran the 22 scientific projects are hard at work sorting through the many samples they collected. Some preliminary findings were announced during a conference in Crans Montana organized by the Swiss Polar Institute, who just appointed Konrad Steffen as new academic director.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.09.2017
Targeted antibiotic use may help cure Chronic Myeloid Leukaemia
The antibiotic tigecycline, when used in combination with current treatment, may hold the key to eradicating chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) cells, according to new research. ‌ The University of Glasgow led study, published today , demonstrates the effectiveness of combining tigecycline with the drug imatinib - a tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) and standard first-line treatment of patients with CML.
Sport Sciences - Pedagogy/Education Science
14.09.2017
Kids Praised for Being Smart Are More Likely to Cheat
An international team of researchers reports that when children are praised for being smart not only are they quicker to give up in the face of obstacles they are also more likely to be dishonest and cheat. Kids as young as age 3 appear to behave differently when told "You are so smart" vs "You did very well this time." The study, published in Psychological Science , is co-authored by Gail Heyman of the University of California San Diego, Kang Lee of the University of Toronto, and Lulu Chen and Li Zhao of Hangzhou Normal University in China.
Medicine/Pharmacology
14.09.2017
Congratulations to Oskar Hansson, author of one of the most cited articles in geriatrics in the last 10 years
Congratulations to Oskar Hansson, author of one of the most cited articles in geriatrics in the last 10 years
Oskar Hansson is professor of neurology at Lund University and us author of one of the most cited articles in geriatrics in the last 10 years, the The list of "Classic Papers" was produced by Google Scholar. The article, which was published in Lancet Neurology in 2006, came in fourth with nearly 1,400 citations.

 
 
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