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Results 61 - 80 of 2157.


Chemistry - Physics - 10.08.2020
Breaking molecular traffic jams with finned nanoporous materials
Thousands of chemical processes used by the energy industry and for other applications rely on the high speed of catalytic reactions, but molecules frequently are hindered by molecular traffic jams that slow them down. Researchers at the University of Minnesota are part of an international team that has invented an entirely new class of porous catalysts using unique fins to speed up the chemistry by allowing molecules to skip the lines that limit the reaction.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.08.2020
Cannabidiol improves blood flow to brain’s hippocampus
A single dose of cannabidiol (CBD) helped increase blood flow to the hippocampus, an important area of the brain associated with memory and emotion, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. Researchers say the findings could be an important discovery for conditions which affect memory, such as Alzheimer's disease and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), and could help better target therapies.

Social Sciences - 07.08.2020
That little voice in your head - if you have it - may be aligning your thoughts
It's not uncommon these days to have some time alone with your thoughts. But what does that sound like, if it sounds like anything at all? Many people feel their thoughts take the form of an inner voice, a sort of conversation with themselves in their mind, according to a new questionnaire on inner voices developed by University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers.

Materials Science - Health - 07.08.2020
A titanate nanowire mask that can eliminate pathogens
A titanate nanowire mask that can eliminate pathogens
Filter "paper" made from titanium oxide nanowires is capable of trapping pathogens and destroying them with light. This discovery by an EPFL laboratory could be put to use in personal protective equipment, as well as in ventilation and air conditioning systems. As part of attempts to curtail the Covid-19 pandemic, paper masks are increasingly being made mandatory.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 07.08.2020
A novel strategy for using compounds as 'anti-evolution' drugs to combat antibiotic resistance
A novel strategy for using compounds as ’anti-evolution’ drugs to combat antibiotic resistance
The rise of antibiotic resistance in many pathogens has been driven by the spread of a small number of strains, suggesting that some bacteria may be genetically pre-disposed to evolving resistance. Researchers at Oxford University have tested this hypothesis by quantifying differences in evolvability between pathogen strains and by searching for 'potentiator' genes that accelerate the evolution of resistance.

Psychology - Health - 07.08.2020
Transgender and gender-diverse individuals are more likely to be autistic and report higher autistic traits
Transgender and gender-diverse individuals are more likely to be autistic and report higher autistic traits
Transgender and gender-diverse adults are three to six times more likely as cisgender adults (individuals whose gender identity corresponds to their sex assigned at birth) to be diagnosed as autistic, according to a new study by scientists at the University of Cambridge's Autism Research Centre. Both autistic individuals and transgender and gender-diverse individuals are marginalized and experience multiple vulnerabilities.

Transport - 07.08.2020
Safe through the moped season: The right helmet can prevent serious head injuries
Safe through the moped season: The right helmet can prevent serious head injuries
Joint investigations by researchers from Graz University of Technology and the ÖAMTC show that the risk of serious head injuries increases when an already damaged helmet or a wrong helmet is worn. Additional images for download can be found at the end of the message In Austria, more than 4,100 moped riders are injured in road accidents every year - including many young people.

Life Sciences - 07.08.2020
Grow faster, die sooner
How growth rates influence the fitness of bacteria Bacteria are survival artists: When they get nutrition, they multiply rapidly, albeit they can also survive periods of hunger. But, when they grow too quickly, their ability to survive is hampered, as studies by a research team at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) on E. coli bacteria show.

Health - 07.08.2020
Poor mental health in lockdown most common among young women
Young women are the most likely to have experienced high levels of depression, anxiety and loneliness in lockdown, compared to older adults, according to new research from the UCL Centre for Longitudinal Studies (CLS). The study, published today as a briefing paper, also found that young women (aged 30) have shown the biggest increase in mental health problems since they were previously assessed some years before compared to middle-aged (aged 50) and older adults (aged 62).

Physics - Chemistry - 07.08.2020
Collecting Hot Carriers: New Process Harvests Excited Quasiparticles
At a Glance Leadership President Provost Board of Trustees Legacy History & Milestones Historic Awards & Honors Caltech Archives Interactive History Map News Publications This is Caltech Caltech Magazine Periodic Table of Caltech Innovation and Impact Exploration and Achievement Directions Campus Maps Parking Tours Administrative Offices & Departments Academic Divisions Biology and Biological Engineering Chemistry and Chemical Enginee

Life Sciences - Health - 07.08.2020
Deprived of Oxygen, Layers of Bacteria Get Creative
At a Glance Leadership President Provost Board of Trustees Legacy History & Milestones Historic Awards & Honors Caltech Archives Interactive History Map News Publications This is Caltech Caltech Magazine Periodic Table of Caltech Innovation and Impact Exploration and Achievement Directions Campus Maps Parking Tours Administrative Offices & Departments Academic Divisions Biology and Biological Engineering Chemistry and Chemical Engine

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 07.08.2020
Discovery could lead to new malaria treatments
A study led by researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) could lead to new treatments for combating drug-resistant malaria, as well as boost existing drugs.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.08.2020
Test accurately IDs people whose gonorrhea can be cured with simple oral antibiotic
A test designed by UCLA researchers can pinpoint which people with gonorrhea will respond successfully to the inexpensive oral antibiotic ciprofloxacin, which had previously been sidelined over concerns the bacterium that causes the infection was becoming resistant to it. In research published in the peer-reviewed journal Clinical Infectious Diseases, a UCLA-led team found that of 106 subjects the test identified as having a strain of gonorrhea called wild-type gyrA serine, all were cured with a single dose of oral ciprofloxacin.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 06.08.2020
Long Neck Helped Reptile Hunt Underwater
Long Neck Helped Reptile Hunt Underwater
Its neck was three times as long as its torso, but had only thirteen extremely elongated vertebrae: "Tanystropheus", a bizarre giraffe-necked reptile which lived 242 million years ago, is a paleontological absurdity. A new study led by the University of Zurich has now shown that the creature lived in water and was surprisingly adaptable.

Agronomy / Food Science - 06.08.2020
Metallic blue fruits use fat to produce colour and signal a treat for birds
Metallic blue fruits use fat to produce colour and signal a treat for birds
Researchers have found that a common plant owes the dazzling blue colour of its fruit to fat in its cellular structure, the first time this type of colour production has been observed in nature. I first noticed these bright blue fruits when I was visiting family in Florence. I thought the colour was really interesting, but it was unclear what was causing it Silvia Vignolini The plant, Viburnum tinus , is an evergreen shrub widespread across the UK and the rest of Europe, which produces metallic blue fruits that are rich in fat.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.08.2020
Strong link found between abnormal liver tests and poor COVID-19 outcomes
Researchers at the Yale Liver Center found that patients with COVID-19 presented with abnormal liver tests at much higher rates than suggested by earlier studies. They also discovered that higher levels of liver enzymes - proteins released when the liver is damaged - were associated with poorer outcomes for these patients, including ICU admission, mechanical ventilation, and death.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.08.2020
Simpler COVID-19 test could provide results in hours from saliva
Associate research specialist Miranda Stauss and senior scientist Roger Wiseman process small vials of spit collected from volunteers. At far right, Tom Friedrich, professor in the UW School of Veterinary Medicine, explains a consent form as his colleague Matt Reynolds, center, assistant professor in the UW School of Veterinary Medicine, hands a volunteer small vial for collecting spit as part of a trial of a new COVID-19 saliva test.

Pharmacology - Health - 06.08.2020
Chemotherapy is used to treat less than 25% of people with localized sarcoma
FINDINGS UCLA researchers have found that chemotherapy is not commonly used when treating adults with localized sarcoma, a rare type of cancer of the soft tissues or bone. In a nationwide analysis of nearly 20,000 patients whose cancer had not yet spread to other organs, the scientists learned that only 22% were treated with some form of chemotherapy.

Health - Life Sciences - 06.08.2020
Brain waves can be used to predict future pain sensitivity
Rhythms produced by the brain can reliably be used to predict how sensitive we are to pain, new research shows. The living brain is constantly producing regular rhythmic patterns of activity, which can be compared to musical notes. Scientists at the University of Birmingham in the UK, and the University of Maryland School of Dentistry in the US, have successfully demonstrated that one particularly prevalent pattern of brain activity, called alpha waves, strongly relates to the body's susceptibility or resilience to pain.

Health - Pharmacology - 06.08.2020
Nanoparticle system captures heart-disease biomarker from blood for in-depth analysis
Researchers at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have developed a method combining sticky nanoparticles with high-precision protein measurement to capture and analyze a common marker of heart disease to reveal details that were previously inaccessible. The new method, a system known as nanoproteomics, effectively captures and measures various forms of the protein cardiac troponin I, or cTnI, a biomarker of heart damage currently used to help diagnose heart attacks and other heart diseases.

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