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Results 61 - 80 of 1792.


Astronomy - Physics / Materials Science - 12.06.2018
The True Power of the Solar Wind
The True Power of the Solar Wind
Electrically charged particles from the sun strike moons and planets with great force. The consequences of these impacts can now be explained by scientists from TU Wien. The planets and moons of our solar system are continuously being bombarded by particles hurled away from the sun. On Earth this has hardly any effect, apart from the fascinating northern lights, because the dense atmosphere and the magnetic field of the Earth protect us from these solar wind particles.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 12.06.2018
Cancer: More targeted use of immunotherapy
Cancer: More targeted use of immunotherapy
Doctors are increasingly fighting cancer by stimulating patients' immune systems. SNSF-supported researchers have now discovered a method for predicting the likelihood of treatment success. Immunotherapy changes a patient's immune system to allow it to attack cancer cells and either destroy them or at least keep them from growing.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 11.06.2018
A single control center for sleep and wake in the brain
A single control center for sleep and wake in the brain
Until now, it was thought that multiple brain areas were needed to control sleep and wakefulness. Neuroscientists from Bern have now identified one single control center for the sleep-wake cycle in the brain. The findings are of great importance for finding new sleep therapies. Every night we spend several hours asleep and every morning we awaken to go about our lives.

Physics / Materials Science - Astronomy - 11.06.2018
Discovery in the sky with nanodiamonds
A faint and mysterious stream of microwaves emanating from star systems far out in the Milky Way could be caused by tiny diamonds, new research has suggested. For decades scientists have been able to measure this ‘glow' of microwave light, dubbed the anomalous microwave emission (AME), coming from a number of regions in the night sky, but have yet to identify its exact source.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 11.06.2018
Genome-editing tool could increase cancer risk in cells, say researchers
Genome-editing tool could increase cancer risk in cells, say researchers
More research needs to be done to understand whether CRISPR-Cas9 - molecular 'scissors' that make gene editing a possibility - may inadvertently increase cancer risk in cells, according to researchers from the University of Cambridge and the Karolinska Institutet. We don't want to sound alarmist, and are not saying that CRISPR-Cas9 is bad or dangerous.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 11.06.2018
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions, including the University of Bristol, provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. The paper, published today , demonstrates that higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations directly increase temperature and rainfall extremes, meaning there could be dangerous changes in these extremes even if the global mean temperature rise remains within 1.5°C.

Innovation / Technology - Physics / Materials Science - 11.06.2018
Silicon-perovskite solar cells achieve record efficiency of 25,2%
Silicon-perovskite solar cells achieve record efficiency of 25,2%
In Neuchâtel (Switzerland), researchers from EPFL and CSEM have combined siliconand perovskite-based solar cells. The resulting efficiency of 25.2% is a record for this type of tandem cell. Their innovative yet simple manufacturing technique could be directly integrated into existing production lines, and efficiency could eventually rise above 30%.

Environment / Sustainable Development - 11.06.2018
Warmer climate will dramatically increase the volatility of global corn crops
Corn, or maize, is the most widely grown crop in the world. Used in food, cooking oil, industrialized foods, livestock feed and even automobile fuel, the crop is one that both rich and poor people rely upon. Research led by the University of Washington looks at what climate change will mean for global yields of this crop.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 11.06.2018
Nectar research sheds light on ecological theory
Different species almost always coexist - whether it's big animals on the plains, bugs in a jungle or yeasts in flower nectar - but how that works is complicated. Now, Stanford researchers have teased apart competing theories of how species live together. A sticky drop of nectar clinging to the tip of a hummingbird's beak drips into the next flower the bird visits.

Astronomy - Physics / Materials Science - 11.06.2018
Experiments at Berkeley Lab Help Trace Interstellar Dust Back to Solar System's Formation
Experiments at Berkeley Lab Help Trace Interstellar Dust Back to Solar System’s Formation
Note: This press release was adapted from an original release by the University of Hawaii at Manoa in Honolulu. View the original release. Experiments conducted at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) helped to confirm that samples of interplanetary particles - collected from Earth's upper atmosphere and believed to originate from comets - contain dust leftover from the initial formation of the solar system.

Astronomy - Physics / Materials Science - 11.06.2018
From Moon Rocks to Space Dust: Berkeley Lab's Extraterrestrial Research
From Moon Rocks to Space Dust: Berkeley Lab’s Extraterrestrial Research
From moon rocks to meteorites, and from space dust to a dinosaur-destroying impact, the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has a well-storied expertise in exploring samples of extraterrestrial origin. This research - which has helped us to understand the makeup and origins of objects within and beyond our solar system - stems from the Lab's long-standing core capabilities and credentials in structural and chemical analyses and measurement at the microscale and nanoscale.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 11.06.2018
Understanding absence epilepsy
Research by Cardiff University has uncovered the brain activity that underlies absence epilepsy, offering new hope for the development of innovative therapies for this disabling disease. Absence epilepsy - the most common form of epilepsy in children and teenagers - causes episodes of lack of awareness which are often mistaken for daydreaming.

Physics / Materials Science - Microtechnics / Electroengineering - 11.06.2018
A better device for measuring electromagnetic radiation
A better device for measuring electromagnetic radiation
Bolometers, devices that monitor electromagnetic radiation through heating of an absorbing material, are used by astronomers and homeowners alike. But most such devices have limited bandwidth and must be operated at ultralow temperatures. Now, researchers say they've found a ultrafast yet highly sensitive alternative that can work at room temperature - and may be much less expensive.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 11.06.2018
Choice matters: The environmental costs of producing meat, seafood
Which food type is more environmentally costly to produce - livestock, farmed seafood, or wild-caught fish? The answer is, it depends. But in general, industrial beef production and farmed catfish are the most taxing on the environment, while small, wild-caught fish and farmed mollusks like oysters, mussels and scallops have the lowest environmental impact, according to a new analysis.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 11.06.2018
Experts explain how personalised diabetes treatments can help patients
Improving diagnosis and further understanding the role of genes in diabetes risk can pave the way for more personalised treatments, say researchers. Dr Ines Cebola, postdoctoral researcher at Imperial College London, and Dr Shivani Misra, consultant in metabolic medicine at Imperial College Healthcare NHS Trust, presented their research on type 2 and rare diabetes, as well as personalised treatments at the recent Imperial College Academic Health Science Centre (AHSC) seminar series.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 11.06.2018
Alzheimer's disease : how amyloid aggregates alter neuronal function
Alzheimer’s disease : how amyloid aggregates alter neuronal function
The accumulation of amyloid peptides in the form of plaques in the brain is one of the primary indicators of Alzheimer's disease.

Life Sciences - 11.06.2018
Pandoravirus : giant viruses invent their own genes
Pandoravirus : giant viruses invent their own genes
Three new members have been isolated and added to the Pandoravirus family by researchers at the Structural and Genomic Information Laboratory (CNRS/Aix‐Marseille Université), working with partners at the Large Scale Biology Laboratory (CEA/Inserm/Université Grenoble‐Alpes) and at CEA-Genoscope.

Physics / Materials Science - Chemistry - 08.06.2018
Tiny defects in semiconductors created 'speed bumps' for electrons. UCLA researchers cleared the path
Tiny defects in semiconductors created ’speed bumps’ for electrons. UCLA researchers cleared the path
New technique could improve electronics' energy efficiency by removing the microscopic flaws usually formed during manufacturing Matthew Chin UCLA scientists and engineers have developed a new process for assembling semiconductor devices. The advance could lead to much more energy-efficient transistors for electronics and computer chips, diodes for solar cells and light-emitting diodes, and other semiconductor-based devices.

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 08.06.2018
Rising CO2 may increase dangerous weather extremes, whatever happens to global temperatures
New research from the University of Oxford and collaborators at several other institutions provides compelling evidence that meeting the global warming target of 1.5°C may not be enough to limit the damage caused by extreme weather. The paper, published today , demonstrates that higher atmospheric CO2 concentrations directly increase temperature and rainfall extremes, meaning there could be dangerous changes in these extremes even if the global mean temperature rise remains within 1.5°C.

Physics / Materials Science - Chemistry - 08.06.2018
Ordered Magnetic Patterns in Disordered Magnetic Material
Ordered Magnetic Patterns in Disordered Magnetic Material
Study led by Berkeley Lab scientists relies on high-resolution microscopy techniques to confirm nanoscale magnetic features A team of scientists working at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) has confirmed a special property known as "chirality" - which potentially could be exploited to transmit and store data in a new way - in nanometers-thick samples of multilayer materials that have a disordered structure.