Category


Years
2017 | 2016 | 2015 | 2014 | 2013 | 2012 | 2011 | 2010 | 2009 | 2008

Last News


Results 61 - 80 of 1432.

Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
14.09.2017
New Study on Graphene-Wrapped Nanocrystals Makes Inroads Toward Next-Gen Fuel Cells
New Study on Graphene-Wrapped Nanocrystals Makes Inroads Toward Next-Gen Fuel Cells
Simulations and analysis at Berkeley Lab provide new atomic-scale clues to material's enhanced hydrogen storage properties A powdery mix of metal nanocrystals wrapped in single-layer sheets of carbon atoms, developed at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), shows promise for safely storing hydrogen for use with fuel cells for passenger vehicles and other uses.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
14.09.2017
Oxidative damage and impairment of protein quality control systems in keratinocytes exposed to a volatile organic compounds cocktail
Oxidative damage and impairment of protein quality control systems in keratinocytes exposed to a volatile organic compounds cocktail
Abstract Compelling evidence suggests that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) have potentially harmful effects to the skin.
Business/Economics - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.09.2017
Stanford scholars say big ideas are getting harder to find
Research from Stanford economists finds that productivity has not matched the exponential increases in research development, suggesting the next big idea may be harder to formulate. Modern-day inventors - even those in the league of Steve Jobs - will have a tough time measuring up to the productivity of the Thomas Edisons of the past.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.09.2017
Gut Bacteria May Play Role in Onset of Multiple Sclerosis
Gut Bacteria May Play Role in Onset of Multiple Sclerosis
New research conducted at Caltech and UC San Francisco (UCSF) is suggesting that the key to curing multiple sclerosis (MS) could be hiding in an unlikely place-our poop.á Multiple sclerosis is a disorder in which the body's own immune system induces an inflammatory response against the protective myelin sheath that helps neurons conduct signals.
Life Sciences
13.09.2017
Synaptic receptor mobility :discovery of a new mechanism for controlling memory
Synaptic receptor mobility :discovery of a new mechanism for controlling memory
Researchers in Bordeaux recently discovered a new mechanism for storing information in synapses and a means of controlling the storage process. The breakthrough moves science closer to unveiling the mystery of the molecular mechanisms of memory and learning processes. The research, carried out primarily by researchers at the Interdisciplinary Institute for Neurosciences (CNRS/UniversitÚ de Bordeaux) and the Bordeaux Imaging Center (CNRS/UniversitÚ de Bordeaux/Inserm) 1 , appears in the 13 september 2017 edition of Nature .
Life Sciences
13.09.2017
New way to control memory
New way to control memory
Scientists discover a new way to control memory The workings of a ‘traffic light system' in the brain, which plays a key role in how new memories are formed, have been detailed for the first time by scientists. A study published today, (Wednesday the 13 of September), led by the Institute for Neurosciences (the National Centre for Scientific Research /the University of Bordeaux) in France and worked on by a researcher now at the University of Sussex, England, reveals the exact routes a key protein needs to take in our brains in order for us to form new memories.
Medicine/Pharmacology
13.09.2017
Lower Thyroid Stimulating Hormone levels elevate risk of thyroid cancer
There is an increased risk of thyroid cancer associated with lower-than-normal thyroid hormone levels, a finding that could have a major impact on patients fighting the disease. The Yale-led study, published in American Association for Cancer Research journal examined the effect of Thyroid Stimulating Hormone (TSH) on the development of human papillary thyroid cancer (PTC).
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
13.09.2017
In step toward 'controlling chemistry,' physicists create a new type of molecule, atom by atom
In step toward ’controlling chemistry,’ physicists create a new type of molecule, atom by atom
UCLA physicists have pioneered a method for creating a unique new molecule that could eventually have applications in medicine, food science and other fields. Their research , which also shows how chemical reactions can be studied on a microscopic scale using tools of physics, is reported . For the past 200 years, scientists have developed rules to describe chemical reactions that they've observed, including reactions in food, vitamins, medications and living organisms.
Astronomy - Chemistry
13.09.2017
Inferno world with titanium skies
Inferno world with titanium skies
An international team of astronomers has detected titanium oxide in the atmosphere of an exoplanet for the first time. The results provide unique information about the chemical composition and the temperature and pressure structure of the atmosphere of this unusual and very hot world. The clear detection of the molecule is a major observational advancement - it is an exciting time in exoplanetary science.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
13.09.2017
Low-level radiation less harmful to health than other lifestyle risks
Low-level radiation exposure poses less of a health risk than other modernálifestyle threats, such as smoking, obesity and air pollution, according to Oxford University research. Human populations have always been exposed to ionizing radiation, and more so in modern life due to its use in medicine, industry and the armed forces.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
13.09.2017
Study identifies blood vessel as a therapeutic target for diabetes
Blood vessels have an often-overlooked role of regulating the transfer of nutrients from the blood to organs in the body. In a new Yale-led study, researchers have identified a role of a secreted protein, apelin, in regulating the transfer of fatty acids across the blood vessels. The study offers insights into a potential target for future therapies for type 2 diabetes.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
13.09.2017
Studies help explain link between autism, severe infection during pregnancy
Studies help explain link between autism, severe infection during pregnancy
Mothers who experience an infection severe enough to require hospitalization during pregnancy are at higher risk of having a child with autism. Two new studies from MIT and the University of Massachusetts Medical School shed more light on this phenomenon and identify possible approaches to preventing it.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
13.09.2017
Researchers Lay Fundamental Groundwork to Better Understanding Optical Properties of Glass
Glass is everywhere. Whether someone is gazing out a window or scrolling through a smartphone, odds are that there is a layer of glass between them and whatever it is they're looking at. Despite being around for at least 5,000 years, there is still a lot that is unknown about this material, such as how certain glasses form and how they achieve certain properties.
Social Sciences
13.09.2017
Offhand comments can expose underlying racism, UW study finds
Offhand comments can expose underlying racism, UW study finds
Blatant racism is easy to identify - a shouted racial slur, a white supremacist rally, or the open discrimination, segregation and violence of the pre-civil rights era. But more subtle forms of bias, called microaggressions , emerge in the everyday exchanges among friends and strangers alike and can offend racial and ethnic minorities.
Arts and Design - Life Sciences
13.09.2017
When music makes male faces more attractive
When music makes male faces more attractive
Women rate photographs of male faces as more attractive and are more likely to date the men pictured when they have previously heard music. Moreover, highly arousing music led to the largest effect on sexual attraction. A team of psychologists led by Manuela Marin (University of Innsbruck) and Helmut Leder (University of Vienna) explains the significance of this finding in relation to the origins of music in their latest publication in the scientific journal PLOS ONE.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
13.09.2017
Study clears important hurdle towards developing an HIV vaccine
Study clears important hurdle towards developing an HIV vaccine
An international team of researchers has demonstrated a way of overcoming one of the major stumbling blocks that has prevented the development of a vaccine against HIV: the ability to generate immune cells that stay in circulation long enough to respond to and stop virus infection. For a vaccine to work, its effects need to be long lasting.
Medicine/Pharmacology
13.09.2017
Researchers Warn About Mixtures of Endocrine Disruptors During Pregnancy
A new study led by Inserm researchers from Irset, the Research Institute for Environmental and Occupational Health, [1 ] shows for the first time in humans that simultaneous exposure to endocrine disruptors exacerbates the effects observed from exposure to each chemical independently. This study focused principally on the human fetal testes and the potential consequences of these mixtures on development of the reproductive system, as the selected chemicals inhibited testosterone production.
Physics/Materials Science - Mathematics
13.09.2017
The Beam of Invisibility
The Beam of Invisibility
A new cloaking technology has been developed at TU Wien: a special kind of material is irradiated from above in such a way that another beam of light can pass completely uninhibited. The material is irradiated with a specially designed pattern, the wave from the left can pass through the object completely unperturbed.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2017
Cancer survivors who quit smoking sooner can live longer
Lung cancer survivors who quit smoking within a year of diagnosis will live for longer than those who continue to smoke, according to new research led by the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham. The findings also revealed that general practitioners are comparatively less likely to intervene and offer stop-smoking support to cancer patients, than they are to people diagnosed with coronary heart disease.
Psychology
12.09.2017
Kids praised for being smart are more likely to cheat, new studies find
Toronto, ON -áKids who are praised for being smart, or who are told they have a reputation for being smart, are more likely to be dishonest and cheat, a pair of studies from the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education (OISE) at the University of Toronto and researchers in the U.S. and China has found.

 
 
Logo Careerjet