news


Category

Years
2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 | 2019 | 2020 | 2021 | 2022 |



Results 61 - 80 of 1569.


Astronomy / Space Science - 12.01.2022
International collaboration offers new evidence of a gravitational wave background
International collaboration offers new evidence of a gravitational wave background
Share this page Share on Twitter Share on facebook Share on linkedin Share on email The results of a comprehensive search for a background of ultra-low frequency gravitational waves has been announced by an international team of astronomers including scientists from the Institute for Gravitational Wave Astronomy at the University of Birmingham.

Pharmacology - Health - 12.01.2022
A new biochip that reduces the cost of manufacturing in vitro skin has been developed
A new biochip that reduces the cost of manufacturing in vitro skin has been developed
Researchers from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), the Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM) and other entities have designed a new biochip, a device that simplifies the process of manufacturing in vitro skin in the laboratory and other complex multi-layer tissues. Human skin modelled using this device could be used in medicine and cosmetic testing, which would reduce the cost of these preclinical trials.

Health - 12.01.2022
People with hearing prostheses use timbre of voice to recognise emotions
People with hearing prostheses use timbre of voice to recognise emotions
Scientists at the University of Jena study the perception of vocal emotions by people with cochlear implants Doctoral candidate Celina von Eiff attaches electrodes to a cap worn by test person Lucas Riedel during an EEG study with cochlear implants. Image: Jens Meyer (University of Jena) Cochlear implants can help people with hearing loss to perceive acoustic stimuli.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.01.2022
Unmuting the genome
Hereditary diseases as well as cancers and cardiovascular diseases may be associated with a phenomenon known as genomic imprinting, in which only the maternally or paternally inherited gene is active. An international research team involving scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM), the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Genetics (MPIMG) in Berlin and Harvard University in Cambridge (USA) has now investigated the mechanisms responsible for the deactivation of the genes.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 12.01.2022
Shape guides the growth of organoids
Shape guides the growth of organoids
Organoids are miniature lab-grown tissue structures that can mimic real organs. But guiding stem cells to grow an organoid of defined shape and size is difficult. Now, EPFL bioengineers have developed new methods for successfully guiding the stem cells to grow into intestinal tissues with real-life 3D structure and function.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.01.2022
Decoding inner language to treat speech disorders
Decoding inner language to treat speech disorders
A research team from the UNIGE and the HUG has succeeded in identifying certain signals produced by our brain when we speak to ourselves. What if it were possible to decode the internal language of individuals deprived of the ability to express themselves? This is the objective of a team of neuroscientists from the University of Geneva and the University Hospitals of Geneva (HUG).

Sport - Health - 12.01.2022
Study aims to prevent deadly sport injury in young athletes
Commotio cordis, a rare sudden-death cardiac event, most commonly affects young children playing baseball (Pixabay) At an Arizona baseball diamond 10 years ago, a 13-year-old baseball player turned to bunt a ball that instead struck his chest. Taking two steps towards first base, he collapsed, and died from commotio cordis, the second leading cause of sudden cardiac death in young athletes.

Health - Social Sciences - 12.01.2022
Water determines health, skeleton research shows
VUB research shows that living close to wetlands increases risk of diseases such as malaria or pulmonary infections such as possible Tuberculosis Wednesday, January 12, 2022 — For her PhD at the Vrije Universiteit Brussel and the University of Sheffield, Dr. Marit Van Cant studied medieval to early modern skeletal populations from six archaeological sites in Flanders.

Earth Sciences - 12.01.2022
SUERC contributes to new study dating earliest human remains in eastern Africa
The age of the oldest fossils in eastern Africa widely recognised as representing our species, Homo sapiens, has long been uncertain. Now, dating of a massive volcanic eruption in Ethiopia reveals they are much older than previously thought. The remains - known as Omo I - were found in Ethiopia in the late 1960s, and scientists have been attempting to date them precisely ever since, by using the chemical fingerprints of volcanic ash layers found above and below the sediments in which the fossils were found.

Life Sciences - 12.01.2022
Like our social media feeds, our brains take a little while to update
Time-lapse videos of faces morphing from young to old and male to female demonstrate how the brain lags when processing visual changes. (Image courtesy of Mauro Manassi) Like our social media feeds, our brains are constantly uploading rich, visual stimuli. But instead of seeing the latest image in real time, we actually see earlier versions because our brain's refresh time is about 15 seconds, according to new UC Berkeley research.

Environment - 12.01.2022
Fish smoking in coastal Ghana linked to high pollutant exposures, elevated health burden
Fish smoking in coastal Ghana linked to high pollutant exposures, elevated health burden
Millions of workers in coastal Africa-most of them women-spend their days preserving fish by smoking them in rudimentary, wood-fired mud ovens. University of Michigan researchers and their colleagues looked at the air pollutant exposures and health symptoms experienced by fish smokers in two coastal cities in the West African nation of Ghana.

Health - Pharmacology - 11.01.2022
Led team refines ’kick and kill’ strategy aimed at eliminating HIV-infected cells
In a study using mice, a UCLA-led team of researchers have improved upon a method they developed in 2017 that was designed to kill HIV-infected cells. The advance could move scientists a step closer to being able to reduce the amount of virus, or even eliminate it, from infected people who are dependent on lifesaving medications to keep the virus from multiplying and illness at bay.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2022
Gene-blocking could be key to curbing obesity
PhD candidate Brent Wakefield led a breakthrough study that could be crucial in addressing obesity. (Photo by Max Martin/Western Communications) It sounds too good to be true: blocking a gene linked to obesity to trigger a major reduction in body fat. While it's not a reality for humans yet, it could be one step closer thanks to new discoveries from a team of anatomy and cell biology researchers in a lab led by Silvia Penuela at Western's Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2022
Identification of a novel therapeutic target in Multiple Myeloma
Identification of a novel therapeutic target in Multiple Myeloma
Multiple myeloma is a cancer of the bone marrow, with a life expectancy of less than 5 years post-diagnosis. Proteasome inhibitors, the therapeutic backbone of current treatments, are very effective in treating newly diagnosed cancers but resistance or intolerance to these molecules inevitably develop, leading to relapses.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 11.01.2022
Recycling Already Considered in the Development of New Battery Materials
Enormous ecological and economic potential consists in the circular value chain of batteries: The use of recycled materials not only reduces the costs of raw materials, but also enables energy savings in battery production.

Life Sciences - Environment - 11.01.2022
How can we know how animals synchronise their behaviour?
How can we know how animals synchronise their behaviour?
Koen de Reus of VUB's Artificial Intelligence Lab and the Comparative Bioacoustics Group at Max Planck Institute for Psycholinguistics in the Netherlands: "Failure of a non-human animal to synchronise in an experiment designed to test humans does not mean they are incapable of synchronising. It could also mean that the experiment was not appropriately designed to test a particular species." VUB researcher Koen de Reus is part of an international team exploring the best way to study how animals synchronise behaviours such as moving, vocalising, and breathing.

Health - Life Sciences - 11.01.2022
Tomato concentrate could help reduce chronic intestinal inflammation associated with HIV
New UCLA-led research in mice suggests that adding a certain type of tomato concentrate to the diet can reduce the intestinal inflammation that is associated with HIV. Left untreated, intestinal inflammation can accelerate arterial disease, which in turn can lead to heart attack and stroke.

Life Sciences - Campus - 11.01.2022
Scientists Expand CRISPR-Cas9 Genetic Inheritance Control in Mammals
Biologists achieve gene conversion in male mice, broadening potential for human disease research and environmental applications Nearly three years ago University of California San Diego researchers announced the world's first CRISPR-Cas9 genetic editing-based approach to controlling inheritance in mammals.

Astronomy / Space Science - 11.01.2022
CHEOPS reveals a rugby ball-shaped exoplanet
CHEOPS reveals a rugby ball-shaped exoplanet
A research team involving the Universities of Bern and Geneva has identified the strong tidal influence on WASP-103b. With the help of the CHEOPS space telescope, an international team including researchers from the Universities of Bern and Geneva as well as the National Centre of Competence in Research (NCCR) PlanetS, was able to detect the deformation of an exoplanet for the first time.

Chemistry - Physics - 11.01.2022
Increasing efficiency in artificial photosynthesis
Chemical engineers at EPFL have developed a new approach to artificial photosynthesis, a method for harvesting solar energy that produces hydrogen as a clean fuel from water. -Artificial photosynthesis is the holy grail of all chemists,- says Astrid Olaya, a chemical engineer at EPFL's Institute of Chemical Sciences and Engineering (ISIC).