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Results 61 - 80 of 1771.


Environment - Earth Sciences - 16.01.2020
Predicting hydraulic fracture propagation more accurately
Predicting hydraulic fracture propagation more accurately
Researchers at EPFL have developed a new model to calculate hydraulic fracture propagation. Acclaimed for its accuracy by experts, the model better predicts fracture geometry and the energy cost of hydraulic fracturing - a widely used technique in areas such as CO2 storage, hydrocarbon extraction, dams and volcano hazard monitoring.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 16.01.2020
Asteroid impact, not volcanic eruptions, killed the dinosaurs
Volcanic activity did not play a direct role in the mass extinction event that killed the dinosaurs and about 75 per cent of Earth's species 66 million years ago, according to a team involving UCL and University of Southampton researchers.

Life Sciences - 16.01.2020
Controlling molecular glue protects connections between brain cells
Controlling molecular glue protects connections between brain cells
A way in which some connections between brain cells can resist degeneration - a hallmark of traumatic brain injuries and neurodegenerative diseases — has been discovered by researchers at The University of Queensland. Dr Sean Coakley and Professor Massimo Hilliard from UQ's Queensland Brain Institute Clem Jones Centre for Ageing Dementia Research uncovered a way in which cells control the stickiness of a molecular glue that protects connections between brain cells and prevent neurodegeneration.

Life Sciences - Environment - 16.01.2020
Glimpse into ancient hunting strategies of dragonflies and damselflies
Dragonflies and damselflies are animals that may appear gentle, but are - in fact - ancient hunters. The closely related insects shared an ancestor over 250 million years ago - long before dinosaurs - and provide a glimpse into how an ancient neural system controlled precise and swift aerial assaults.

Health - 15.01.2020
Obesity crisis blamed for a rise in fatty liver disease amongst young adults
Obesity crisis blamed for a rise in fatty liver disease amongst young adults
One in five young people have fatty liver disease (steatosis), with one in 40 having already developed liver scarring (fibrosis), research published today [15 January] has found. The study, published in The Lancet Gastroenterology & Hepatology, is the first to attempt to determine the prevalence of fatty liver disease and fibrosis in young healthy adults in the UK.

History / Archeology - 15.01.2020
The colours of the Pachacamac idol, an Inca God, finally revealed
The colours of the Pachacamac idol, an Inca God, finally revealed
Researchers from the CNRS, Sorbonne Université, université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne, the Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle and the Musée du Quai Branly - Jacques Chirac have shown colours formerly painted on the Pachacamac idol, a 15th century Inca God and oracle. Paired with the first carbon 14 dating of the object, these results published in PLOS ONE on 15 January 2020 shed light on colour practices, and how important they were in the Andes at that time.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 15.01.2020
New Mechanisms Describe How the Genome Regulates Itself
An organism's genome contains all of the information necessary for each of its cells and tissues to develop and function properly. Written in DNA, each individual gene encodes for something, whether it is a structural protein that helps define a tissue's shape, an enzyme that catalyzes the chemical reactions of life, or a signaling protein that cells use to communicate.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Analysis: Women who have more sex may enter the menopause later
Megan Arnot (UCL Anthropology) discusses a new study conducted with Professor Ruth Mace (UCL Anthropology) which found that women's sexual behaviour is connected with menopause timing. Globally, on average, women experience the menopause at around the age of 50. But there's a great deal of variation in this age both within and between countries.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Women who have less sex enter the menopause earlier
Megan Arnot (UCL Anthropology) discusses a new study conducted with Professor Ruth Mace (UCL Anthropology) which found that women's sexual behaviour is connected with menopause timing. Globally, on average, women experience the menopause at around the age of 50. But there's a great deal of variation in this age both within and between countries.

Health - 15.01.2020
Hospital readmission policy did not increase mortality risk
The Obamacare program intended to reduce the risk of patients being readmitted after hospitalizations for heart attacks, heart failure, and pneumonia has not caused an increase in mortality risk for patients in emergency departments or observational units, according to a new report. Doctors from Yale and the University of Texas (UT) Southwestern Medical Center conducted the study, which appears Jan.

Health - Psychology - 15.01.2020
Harmful effects of ageism on older persons’ health found in 45 countries
In the largest examination to date of the health consequences of ageism, or age-based bias, researchers at the Yale School of Public Health have found evidence that it harms the health of older people in 45 countries and across 5 continents. The study included over 7 million participants. Yale Professor Becca Levy was asked by the World Health Organization to lead the analysis as part of its newly launched Global Campaign to Combat Ageism , which is supported by 194 countries.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage
Animals reduce the symmetry of their markings to improve camouflage
Some forms of camouflage have evolved in animals to exploit a loophole in the way predators perceive their symmetrical markings. The University of Bristol findings, published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B today [15 Jan], describe how animals have evolved to mitigate this defensive disadvantage in their colouration.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Animals should use short, fast movements to avoid being located
Most animals need to move, whether this is to seek out food, shelter or a mate. New research has shown that movement doesn't always break camouflage and if an animal needs to move, animals that are unpatterned and use short, fast movements are less likely to be located by predators. In most cases, most of the visual field of a predator does not fall within a high-resolution area and so, when an undetected prey moves, that motion will often be in peripheral vision.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 15.01.2020
Class of strange objects near our galaxy’s enormous black hole
Astronomers from UCLA's Galactic Center Orbits Initiative have discovered a new class of bizarre objects at the center of our galaxy, not far from the supermassive black hole called Sagittarius A*. They published their research in the Jan. 16 issue of the journal Nature. “These objects look like gas and behave like stars,” said co-author Andrea Ghez, UCLA's Lauren B. Leichtman and Arthur E. Levine Professor of Astrophysics and director of the UCLA Galactic Center Group.

Health - Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Into leading cause of stillbirth awarded £2.4 million funding
Researchers have been awarded over £2.4 million to investigate the best technique to manage poor growth in babies during the later stages of pregnancy Fetal growth restriction (FGR) can lead to stillbirth, accounting for half of the cases of stillbirth in the UK. The new international study, funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR), will investigate the best time to deliver babies who are diagnosed with FGR in late preterm pregnancy.

Computer Science / Telecom - 15.01.2020
Introducing the Human Screenome Project
Millions of screenshots sent from personal devices every five seconds will transform our understanding of everything from fake news to depression. As digital devices become ubiquitous in the world, so have concerns about the harmful effects of screen-related behaviors. Does screen time impair concentration, lead to anxiety or depression, hinder social behavior or curb our ability to tell fake from real news?

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 15.01.2020
Interstellar journey of life's building block phosphorus unveiled
Interstellar journey of life’s building block phosphorus unveiled
Phosphorus, present in our DNA and cell membranes, is an essential element for life. But how it became available on the early Earth when life appeared here about 4 billion years ago is something of a mystery. For the first time, astronomers - among them researchers from the University of Bern - have now been able to show that molecules with phosphorus are formed in star-forming regions and probably came to Earth with comets.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Zebra finches learn their courtship song efficiently
Zebra finches learn their courtship song efficiently
Zebra finches are very efficient at learning their courtship songs, as researchers from ETH Zurich and the University of Zurich have shown. In the morning, the birds remember the positive learning progress of the previous day, but forget the failures overnight. Some principles and mechanisms of learning are identical, for example, in both language acquisition and in learning different motor skills.

Life Sciences - 15.01.2020
Having less sex linked to earlier menopause
Having less sex linked to earlier menopause
Women who engage in sexual activity weekly or monthly have a lower risk of entering menopause early relative to those who report having some form of sex less than monthly, according to a new UCL study. The researchers observed that women, who reported engaging in sexual activity weekly, were 28% less likely to have experienced menopause at any given age than women who engaged in sexual activity less than monthly.

Environment - 15.01.2020
Irrigation alleviates hot extremes
Irrigation alleviates hot extremes
Researchers from ETH Zurich and other universities found evidence that expanding irrigation has dampened anthropogenic warming during hot days, with particularly strong effects over South Asia. Large-scale irrigation is one of the land management practices with the largest effect on climate conditions - and especially hot extremes - in various regions across the globe.

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