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Results 61 - 80 of 1868.


Social Sciences - 23.03.2020
Teens who are bullied struggle with long-term mental health issues
Bullying can make life miserable in the short term for teens, but its impact can also linger into young adulthood, says a University of Michigan researcher. Much is known about the negative effects of bullying, ranging from depression to poor performance in school, but a new study indicates that bullied teens can suffer long-term mental health problems that last into early adulthood.

Health - Life Sciences - 23.03.2020
New Library of Artificial Antibodies Could Target Pathogens With Molecular Precision
New Library of Artificial Antibodies Could Target Pathogens With Molecular Precision
Berkeley Lab technique could accelerate the design of affordable antibodies for biomedical applications A research team led by Berkeley Lab has developed a technique that could accelerate the design of artificial antibodies for biomedical applications - from sensing technologies that detect and neutralize infectious viruses and bacteria to the early detection of Alzheimer's.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 23.03.2020
One Step Closer to a Fast-Charging Battery
One Step Closer to a Fast-Charging Battery
In collaboration with Brookhaven National Lab, Berkeley Lab researchers were able to visualize a key feature of lithium titanate Berkeley Lab researchers, working with a team at Brookhaven National Laboratory, have made a key discovery about the dynamic structural changes in a material called lithium titanate, putting scientists one step closer to achieving a fast-charging lithium battery.

Physics - Life Sciences - 23.03.2020
X-ray imaging Reveals Insights into a Natural Mosquito-Killing Compound
A mosquito-targeting toxin produced by bacteria could lead to safer and more effective anti-mosquito products Many of the chemicals used to deter or eliminate disease-carrying mosquitoes can pollute ecosystems and drive the evolution of even more problematic, insecticide-resistant species - but thankfully, we may have better options soon.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.03.2020
Stem Cells and Nerves Interact in Tissue Regeneration and Cancer Progression
Stem Cells and Nerves Interact in Tissue Regeneration and Cancer Progression
Researchers at the University of Zurich show that different stem cell populations are innervated in distinct ways. Innervation may therefore be crucial for proper tissue regeneration. They also demonstrate that cancer stem cells likewise establish contacts with nerves. Targeting tumour innervation could thus lead to new cancer therapies.

Health - 23.03.2020
"Spanish and Dutch systems already under intense pressure"
Antwerp researchers launch website to compare coronavirus impact per country. All European countries are currently fighting the coronavirus. The capacity of their respective health systems will play a decisive role in their efforts to combat COVID-19. UAntwerp scientists have developed a method to compare the pressure on different countries' health systems in real time.

Life Sciences - Health - 23.03.2020
DNA riddle: how cells access data from 'genetic cotton reels'
DNA riddle: how cells access data from ’genetic cotton reels’
Research has revealed the role played by motor protein CHD4 that allows the DNA to remodel when information is needed - and it will help us understand diseases connected to when that process goes wrong. Australian scientists have unravelled part of the mystery about how nature can usefully access genetic information in cells despite it being so tightly packed away.

Social Sciences - 23.03.2020
Are Victorians afraid of crime?
While intense and frequent concern about crime is rare, a survey of nearly 3000 people from across the state reveals online harassment is the chief source of this kind of angst. New figures have revealed the types of crime many Victorians are most worried about and how social activities - like talking with neighbours or joining a community group - can make people feel significantly safer.

Pharmacology - Health - 23.03.2020
IOR lays the foundation for a new clinical trial against lymphomas
IOR lays the foundation for a new clinical trial against lymphomas
A study conducted by med.  Francesco Bertoni at the Institute of Oncology Research ( IOR , affiliated to USI) has shown that a specific combination of drugs is a potentially winning strategy in the fight against lymphomas. The results obtained in the laboratory have enabled the researchers at the Istituto Oncologico della Svizzera italiana ( IOSI ) to develop a clinical study together with the Swiss Group for Clinical Cancer Research ( SAKK ).

Environment - Life Sciences - 22.03.2020
A new tool for identifying climate-adaptive coral reefs
A new tool for identifying climate-adaptive coral reefs
Climate change is threatening the world's coral reefs, and saving them all will prove impossible. A team from EPFL has developed a method for identifying corals with the greatest adaptive potential to heat stress. The research, published in the journal Evolutionary Applications, should support improved and better-targeted marine biodiversity conservation strategies.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 22.03.2020
Christmas Island discovery redraws map of life
Christmas Island discovery redraws map of life
The world's animal distribution map will need to be redrawn and textbooks updated, after researchers discovered the existence of ‘Australian' species on Christmas Island. The University of Queensland's Professor Jonathan Aitchison said the finding revises the long-held understanding of the location of one of biology and geography's most significant barriers - the Wallace line.

Social Sciences - 20.03.2020
How digital humanities can help in a pandemic
With the onset of the COVID-19 outbreak, there is a race against the clock to implement science-based measures to protect society's most vulnerable populations. Public engagement with data has never been more urgent, and as EPFL professor Robert West explains, digital humanities research has a key role to play.

Health - Pharmacology - 20.03.2020
Kids exposed to TB at higher risk of disease than thought
Stanford scientists led the first comprehensive effort since the 1940s to measure how likely children are to develop tuberculosis when a family member has the disease. Young children exposed to tuberculosis are at surprisingly high risk of developing the disease, according to research led by the School of Medicine.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 20.03.2020
How to get conductive gels to stick when wet
How to get conductive gels to stick when wet
A new way of making polymers adhere to surfaces may enable better biomedical sensors and implants. But there has been a sticking point preventing their widespread use: their inability to adhere to a surface such as a sensor or microchip, and stay put despite moisture from the body. Now, researchers at MIT have come up with a way of getting conductive polymer gels to adhere to wet surfaces.

Health - 20.03.2020
Health forums: Style of language influences credibility and trust
Health forums: Style of language influences credibility and trust
More and more, people are using internet forums as first place to look for information on health issues. However, the scientific medical information being provided there is often so complex that laypeople are barely able to form considered judgements on the content of much of the advice. One criterion which users apply instead in evaluating the information is the style of the language used.

Life Sciences - Health - 20.03.2020
Bringing silicon computing power to the brain
Bringing silicon computing power to the brain
A new device enables researchers to observe hundreds of neurons in the brain in real-time. The system is based on modified silicon chips from cameras, but rather than taking a picture, it takes a movie of the neural electrical activity. Researchers at Stanford University have developed a new device for connecting the brain directly to silicon-based technologies.

Health - 20.03.2020
Reveals how long COVID-19 remains infectious on cardboard, metal and plastic
The virus that causes COVID-19 remains for several hours to days on surfaces and in aerosols, a new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine found. The study suggests that people may acquire the coronavirus through the air and after touching contaminated objects. Scientists discovered the virus is detectable for up to three hours in aerosols, up to four hours on copper, up to 24 hours on cardboard and up to two to three days on plastic and stainless steel.

Electroengineering - 20.03.2020
Flat-panel technology could transform antennas, wireless and cell phone communications
Flat-panel technology could transform antennas, wireless and cell phone communications
Electronically controlled 2-D reflector promises improved microwave communications, beam steering without moving pieces, and one-way microwave mirrors Our new reflectors offer lightweight, low-profile alternatives to conventional antennas. This is a potential boon for satellites, where minimizing weight and size is crucial.

Environment - 20.03.2020
The right dose of geoengineering could reduce climate change risks
The right dose of geoengineering could reduce climate change risks
Injecting the right dose of sulphur dioxide into Earth's upper atmosphere to thicken the layer of light reflecting aerosol particles artificially could reduce the effects of climate change overall, according to UCL and Harvard researchers. Stratospheric aerosol geoengineering is the idea that adding a layer of aerosol particles to the upper atmosphere can reduce climate changes caused by greenhouse gases such as carbon dioxide.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 20.03.2020
In pictures: the Imperial lab developing a COVID-19 vaccine
In pictures: the Imperial lab developing a COVID-19 vaccine
Scores of researchers are racing to create a virus to combat the coronavirus COVID-19. Professor Robin Shattock and his team in Imperial College London's Department of Infectious Disease developed a candidate vaccine within 14 days of getting the sequence from China. They have been testing the vaccine on animals since 10 February and plan to move to clinical trials in the summer.

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