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Results 61 - 80 of 1434.

Earth Sciences - Life Sciences
13.11.2017
World's longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light
World’s longest sauropod dinosaur trackway brought to light
In 2009, the world's largest dinosaur tracks were discovered in the French village of Plagne, in the Jura Mountains. Since then, a series of excavations at the site has uncovered other tracks, sprawling over more than 150 meters. They form the longest sauropod trackway ever to be found.
Civil Engineering/Traffic Engineering - Environment/Sustainable Development
13.11.2017
Urban trees are growing faster worldwide
Urban trees are growing faster worldwide
Research news Trees in metropolitan areas have been growing faster than trees in rural areas worldwide since the 1960s. This has been confirmed for the first time by a study on the impact of the urban heat island effect on tree growth headed by the Technical University of Munich (TUM). The analysis conducted by the international research team also shows that the growth of urban trees has already been exposed to changing climatic conditions for a long period of time, which is only just beginning to happen for trees in rural areas.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Social Sciences
13.11.2017
Society's excluded people ten times more likely to die early
Society’s excluded people ten times more likely to die early
People excluded from mainstream society in high-income countries have a tenfold increased risk of early death, according to research from UCL, homeless health charity Pathway and an international team of experts. The researchers found the mortality rate among socially excluded groups including homeless people, people who sell sex, prisoners and people who use hard drugs, was nearly eight times higher than the population average for men, and nearly 12 times for women.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
13.11.2017
Brain imaging reveals ADHD as a collection of different disorders
Yale researchers have found that patients with different types of attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) have impairments in unique brain systems, indicating that there may not be a one-size-fits-all explanation for the cause of the disorder. Based on performance on behavioral tests, adolescents with ADHD fit into one of three subgroups, where each group demonstrated distinct impairments in the brain with no common abnormalities between them.
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
13.11.2017
Synthetic circuits can harvest light energy
Synthetic circuits can harvest light energy
By organizing pigments on a DNA scaffold, an MIT-led team of researchers has designed a light-harvesting material that closely mimics the structure of naturally occurring photosynthetic structures. The researchers showed that their synthetic material can absorb light and efficiently transfer its energy along precisely controlled pathways.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
13.11.2017
CRISPR-carrying nanoparticles edit the genome
CRISPR-carrying nanoparticles edit the genome
In a new study, MIT researchers have developed nanoparticles that can deliver the CRISPR genome-editing system and specifically modify genes in mice. The team used nanoparticles to carry the CRISPR components, eliminating the need to use viruses for delivery. Using the new delivery technique, the researchers were able to cut out certain genes in about 80 percent of liver cells, the best success rate ever achieved with CRISPR in adult animals.
Life Sciences - Chemistry
13.11.2017
Fuel Cell X-Ray Study Details Effects of Temperature and Moisture on Performance
Fuel Cell X-Ray Study Details Effects of Temperature and Moisture on Performance
Like a well-tended greenhouse garden, a specialized type of hydrogen fuel cell - which shows promise as a clean, renewable next-generation power source for vehicles and other uses - requires precise temperature and moisture controls to be at its best. If the internal conditions are too dry or too wet, the fuel cell won't function well.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Administration/Government
13.11.2017
Less blood can be used in heart operations
A major international study involving Australian cardiac patients has found surgeons can safely use significantly less blood than they traditionally have been in heart operations. Researchers - including Royal Melbourne Hospital heart surgeon and University of Melbourne deputy director of surgery Professor Alistair Royse - believe they can safely save the equivalent of one blood donation per moderate-to-high risk patient.
Medicine/Pharmacology
13.11.2017
New research leads way for fast tracking lung cancer diagnosis
A new initiative is successfully encouraging those at higher risk of lung cancer to act sooner when symptoms appear. The innovation could help improve survival rates for Australia's biggest cancer killer.  Professor Jon Emery, from the University of Melbourne Centre for Cancer Research and Department of General Practice, is presenting initial results from the CHEST Trial at the Clinical Oncology Society of Australia Annual Scientific Meeting during Lung Cancer Awareness Month (November).
Administration/Government
12.11.2017
Heart’s pumping function is not an indicator of heart failure survival rates
FINDINGS Contrary to popular practice, a measure of the heart's pumping function known as “left ventricular ejection fraction” is not associated with the long-term outcomes of hospitalized heart failure patients, a UCLA-led study of Medicare patients has found. Hospitalized heart failure patients in all age groups within the study and with all levels of ejection fraction had significantly lower rates of survival after five years and a higher risk of re-hospitalization than people in the United States without heart failure.
Earth Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
10.11.2017
New insights into the 2004 Sumatra megathrust earthquake
New insights into the 2004 Sumatra megathrust earthquake
Research news Scientists in Munich have completed the first detailed simulation of the Sumatra earthquake that triggered a devastating tsunami on Christmas 2004. The results of the largest-ever rupture dynamics simulation of an earthquake offer new insights into the underlying geophysical processes. It was performed on the SuperMUC supercomputer at the Leibniz Supercomputing Center (LRZ) of the Bavarian Academy of Sciences in Munich.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
10.11.2017
An atlas of the heart
An atlas of the heart
Research news A healthy heart beats about two billion times during a lifetime - thanks to the interplay of more than 10,000 proteins. Researchers from the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry (MPIB) and the German Heart Centre at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now determined which and how many individual proteins are present in each type of cell that occurs in the heart.
Life Sciences
10.11.2017
The pros and cons of large ears
The pros and cons of large ears
Researchers at Lund University in Sweden have compared how much energy bats use when flying, depending on whether they have large or small ears. Large ears increase air resistance, meaning that long-eared bats are forced to expend more energy than species with small ears. On the plus side, large ears generate more lift and provide better hearing.
Business/Economics - Mathematics
10.11.2017
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows
No-growth economy could mean fewer crashes and higher wages, study shows An economy based on zero growth could be more stable - experiencing fewer crashes - and bring higher wages, suggests a new University of Sussex study. Running counter to dominant economic thinking, the new research shows that economies can be stable with or without growth and are in fact likely to be less volatile if we stop chasing ever-increasing GDP.
Medicine/Pharmacology
10.11.2017
HPV jab means women only need three cervical screens in a lifetime
HPV jab means women only need three cervical screens in a lifetime
Women may only need three cervical screens in their lifetime if they have been given the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, according to a new study by Queen Mary University of London (QMUL). The Cancer Research UK-funded team found that three screens at 30, 40 and 55 would offer the same benefit to vaccinated women as the 12 lifetime screens currently offered in England.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Physics/Materials Science
10.11.2017
A rubber power station
A rubber power station
Researchers from Empa have developed a flexible material that generates electricity when stressed. In future, it might be used as a sensor, integrated into clothing or even implanted in the human body, for instance, to power a pacemaker.
Arts and Design - Life Sciences
10.11.2017
That music playing in your head: a real conundrum for scientists
That music playing in your head: a real conundrum for scientists
Researchers at EPFL can now see what happens in our brains when we hear music in our heads. The researchers hope that in time their findings will be used to help people who have lost the ability to speak. When we listen to music, different parts of our brain process different information - such as high and low frequencies - so that our auditory perception of the sounds matches what we hear.
Medicine/Pharmacology
10.11.2017
The consumption of antioxidant-rich foods is associated with a lower risk of type 2 diabetes
A lower risk of type 2 diabetes has been observed among individuals consuming food rich in antioxidants. This effect is largely contributed by fruit, vegetables, tea and other hot beverages, as well as moderate consumption of alcohol, as shown in a recent study from an Inserm research group, published in Diabetologia , the journal of the European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD).
Social Sciences
10.11.2017
Study highlights how community violence fosters antisocial behaviour in kids
Study highlights how community violence fosters antisocial behaviour in kids
Children and adolescents who are regularly confronted with violence in their communities have a greater tendency to show antisocial behaviour according to the authors of a new study published in the journal Frontiers of Behavioral Neuroscience . The research, from psychiatrists and psychologists at the University Psychiatric Hospital Basel (Switzerland) and the Universities of Bath, Southampton and Birmingham (UK), examined the link between exposure to community violence and antisocial behavior in over 1000 children and adolescents from seven European countries.
Sport Sciences
10.11.2017
Biobanding evaluation nets positive results among academy football teams
Biobanding evaluation nets positive results among academy football teams
Matching young players according to their developmental or biological age, as opposed to their chronological age, has positive effects in terms of performance, talent identification and injury reduction in football, according to a new significant new study. The paper, published in the Journal of Sports Sciences , from researchers in our Department for Health was also the first to explore athletes' experiences of competing in a 'biobanded tournament'.

 
 
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