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Results 61 - 80 of 1501.

Careers/Employment - Business/Economics
14.02.2018
Universal basic income policies don’t cause people to leave workforce, study finds
New research from the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy suggests that a universal basic income would not cause people to leave the workforce. Such proposals, including one considered by Hillary Clinton during her 2016 presidential campaign, include direct payments that ensure each resident has a baseline of income to provide for basic needs.
Computer Science/Telecom - Environment/Sustainable Development
14.02.2018
The uncertain unicycle that taught itself and how it's helping AI make good decisions
The uncertain unicycle that taught itself and how it’s helping AI make good decisions
Cambridge researchers are pioneering a form of machine learning that starts with only a little prior knowledge and continually learns from the world around it. This is just like a human would learn. We don't start knowing everything. We learn things incrementally, from only a few examples, and we know when we are not yet confident in our understanding Zoubin Ghahramani In the centre of the screen is a tiny unicycle.
Life Sciences
14.02.2018
Watching myelin patterns form
Watching myelin patterns form
Research news Nerve fibers are surrounded by a myelin sheath. Scientists at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) have now made the first-ever "live" observations of how this protective layer is formed. The team discovered that the characteristic patterns of the myelin layer are determined at an early stage.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Innovation/Technology
14.02.2018
Organ-on-chip technology enters next stage as experts test hepatitis B virus
Scientists at Imperial College London have become the first in the world to test how pathogens interact with artificial human organs. Artificial human organs, or organ-on-chip technologies, simulate a whole organ's cell make up and physiology. They act as alternatives to animal models in drug safety testing, but until now they have not been used to test how infectious diseases interact with the organs.
History/Archeology - Life Sciences
14.02.2018
The history of domestication: a rabbit’s tale
Wild rabbits are widely thought to have been first tamed in 600 A.D. by French monks, when they were prized as food as a 'meat substitute' during Lent. But, according to Oxford University research, that isn't true. Domestication, which is often defined as 'the process of taming an animal and keeping it as a pet or on a farm, and the cultivation of a plant for food', can be dated using historical and archaeological records.
Agronomy/Food Science - Medicine/Pharmacology
14.02.2018
Food deserts not to blame for growing nutrition gap between rich and poor, study finds
For decades, the conventional wisdom has been that people living in food deserts-defined as areas lacking in supermarkets with fresh produce and other nutritious items-have little choice but to buy unhealthy food at drugstores or convenience stores. But the data tell a different story. A new Chicago Booth study finds that food deserts have no meaningful effect on eating habits.
Innovation/Technology - Academic Rankings
14.02.2018
Research influences innovation on a global scale
Research influences innovation on a global scale
How much impact does research carried out at individual universities have on innovation globally? To find out, a team of scientists from several schools developed a ranking system based on citations in patent literature. And on that score, EPFL sits in seventh place, just behind Stanford and above the California Institute of Technology.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.02.2018
What is your real ’biological age’-
Having an older biological age on aged-based risk calculators simply means you have at least one risk factor that is higher than the number set as "normal", writes Dr Carissa Bonner from the School of Public Health. Age-based risk calculators that work out your "real biological age" are increasingly popular.
Life Sciences - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
14.02.2018
Tissue mechanics essential for cell movement
Cells that form facial features need surrounding embryonic tissues to stiffen so they can move and develop, according to new UCL-led research. The discovery has important implications for understanding the causes of facial defects which account for a third of all birth defects globally (3.2 million each year) and are the primary cause of infant mortality.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.02.2018
Brain scan and artificial intelligence could help predict whether OCD will improve with treatment
Brain scan and artificial intelligence could help predict whether OCD will improve with treatment
Washing hands needlessly dozens of times of day. Spending so much time perfecting schoolwork that it never gets turned in. These are typical behaviors for people with obsessive compulsive disorder, or OCD, a lifelong illness marked by repetitive thoughts and actions that can seriously impair work performance, relationships and quality of life.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
14.02.2018
Meet RIPK3: Good Cop, Bad Cop, all in one
Each year, influenza kills half a million people globally with the elderly and very young most often the victims. In fact, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported 37 children have died in the United States during the current flu season. Aside from getting the flu shot and employing smart hand hygiene, there are no other methods of prevention.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Life Sciences
13.02.2018
Sewage and animal waste having serious impact on UK coastline
Analysis of fragile seagrass meadows by Cardiff University and Swansea University scientists has shown that consistent pollution from sewage and livestock waste is affecting their survival. Seagrass meadows are flowering plants that have adapted to live a life in the sea and were recently featured in the BBC's Blue Planet II episode ‘Green Seas'.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
13.02.2018
Newly discovered gene may protect against heart disease
Newly discovered gene may protect against heart disease
Scientists have identified a gene that may play a protective role in preventing heart disease. Their research revealed that the gene, called MeXis, acts within key cells inside clogged arteries to help remove excess cholesterol from blood vessels. Published Medicine, the UCLA-led study in mice found that MeXis controls the expression of a protein that pumps cholesterol out of cells in the artery wall.
History/Archeology - Environment/Sustainable Development
13.02.2018
Citrus fruit peel offers new evidence on early cultivation
Citrus fruit peel offers new evidence on early cultivation
Citrus fruit was being cultivated in India in the Late Neolithic period and in southern Thailand in the Iron Age, according to new findings by archaeologists at UCL and Peking University, Beijing. Citrus fruit are widespread and well known nearly everywhere today, but very little is known about how they were domesticated and diversified.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Physics/Materials Science
13.02.2018
Light-activated cancer drugs without toxic side effects: fresh insight
Cancer drugs activated by light, minimizing toxic side-effects, are a step closer thanks to new research from University of Warwick and Monash University through the Monash Warwick Alliance.
Environment/Sustainable Development - Agronomy/Food Science
13.02.2018
Forest fires during droughts are major source of Amazonian carbon emissions
Forest fires during droughts are major source of Amazonian carbon emissions
Extreme droughts in the Brazilian Amazon are causing forest fires that release significant carbon emissions, reveals a new study. Despite significant achievements by the Brazilian authorities in curbing carbon emissions from deforestation, these gains could be undermined by repeated droughts in the 21st Century.
Medicine/Pharmacology
13.02.2018
North-south divide revealed as prescription of opioid drugs rise
The prescription of opioid drugs by GPs in England is steadily rising, especially in more deprived communities, even though they can cause complications and adverse effects and do not work for chronic pain, a UCL study has revealed. The study, led by Dr Luke Mordecai, a pain research fellow at University College London Hospital (UCLH) found that over a 43 month period between 2010 and 2014 there was a rise in opioid prescribing.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
13.02.2018
'Off the shelf' living artificial tissues could repair severe nerve injuries
’Off the shelf’ living artificial tissues could repair severe nerve injuries
Severe nerve damage has been successfully repaired in the laboratory using a new living artificial nerve tissue developed by UCL, ReNeuron and Sartorius Stedim Biotech.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
13.02.2018
New quantum memory stores information for hours
New quantum memory stores information for hours
Storing information in a quantum memory system is a difficult challenge, as the data is usually quickly lost. At TU Wien, ultra-long storage times have now been achieved using tiny diamonds. At some locations in the crystal lattice, a carbon atom (white) is missing, and at the neighbouring site there is a nitrogen atom (yellow).
Environment/Sustainable Development - Agronomy/Food Science
13.02.2018
Intensive agriculture influences U.S. regional summer climate, study finds
Intensive agriculture influences U.S. regional summer climate, study finds
Scientists agree that changes in land use such as deforestation, and not just greenhouse gas emissions, can play a significant role altering the world's climate systems. Now, a new study by researchers at MIT and Dartmouth College reveals how another type of  land use, intensive agriculture, can impact regional climate.