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Results 61 - 80 of 1588.


Social Sciences - Health - 17.06.2019
Social Exclusion Measured in fMRI
Social Exclusion Measured in fMRI
A fMRI study shows the effect of social support on the social exclusion experience. Social belonging is a fundamental need for the life of human beings.

Social Sciences - 17.06.2019
Murder of Jo Cox used by "digital prophets" to widen divides before EU vote
MP Jo Cox's murder sparked a wave of inaccurate speculation on social media which may have influenced voters before the EU Referendum, research concludes. Cardiff University's Crime and Security Research Institute analysed nearly 44,000 tweets mentioning key terms “Jo Cox” and “Brexit”, which were posted in the run up to the crucial vote.

Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 17.06.2019
Preventing drugs from being transported
Certain membrane proteins specialise in transporting molecules out of cells - a problem for the efficacy of cancer medication and antibiotics. An international research team has investigated the transport mechanism of a bacterial membrane protein using an artificially produced antibody fragment. The transport proteins, called ABC exporters, are present, for instance, in the cell membranes of bacteria and in large quantities in cancer cells and are responsible for transporting small molecules out of the cells.

Innovation / Technology - 17.06.2019
Going wireless in Greenland
Going wireless in Greenland
Glaciers are beginning to move faster than they have ever done before. Our warming world is melting the ice on top of glaciers, causing meltwater to trickle down through cracks and holes and act as a lubricant over which the glacier can roll - much like shopping items on a conveyer belt. When a glacier slides downstream and eventually meets the ocean, it melts and causes sea levels to rise with potentially devastating effects for coastal communities around the world.

Social Sciences - 17.06.2019
Review of Intensive Family Preservation Services
Intensive social work designed to help families in crisis is effective in preventing children from entering care, research has found. In association with its research partner the Children's Social Care Research and Development Centre (CASCADE) at Cardiff University, What Works for Children's Social Care has launched its latest report examining the evidence-base and effectiveness of Intensive Family Preservation Services (IFPS).

Physics - Materials Science - 17.06.2019
You Don't Have to Be Perfect for TMDCs to Shine Bright
You Don’t Have to Be Perfect for TMDCs to Shine Bright
Atomically thin semiconductors known as TMDCs (transition metal dichalcogenides) could lead to devices that operate more efficiently than conventional semiconductors in light-emitting diodes, lasers, and solar cells. But these materials are hard to make without defects that dampen their performance.

Chemistry - Physics - 17.06.2019
Here Comes the Sun: A New Framework for Artificial Photosynthesis
Here Comes the Sun: A New Framework for Artificial Photosynthesis
Scientists have long sought to mimic the process by which plants make their own fuel using sunlight, carbon dioxide, and water through artificial photosynthesis devices, but how exactly substances called catalysts work to generate renewable fuel remains a mystery.

Materials Science - 17.06.2019
Groundbreaking Study Maps Out Paths to New Nitride Materials
Groundbreaking Study Maps Out Paths to New Nitride Materials
Formed by elements combining with nitrogen, nitrides can possess unique properties with potential applications from semiconductors to industrial coatings. But before nitrides can be put to use, they first must be discovered - and the odds of finding them in nature are slim. Now, your chances of discovering new nitrides just got better with a groundbreaking Nature Materials study led by Berkeley Lab in close collaboration with the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and a number of other institutions.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 17.06.2019
Melting a satellite, a piece at a time
Melting a satellite, a piece at a time
Researchers took one of the densest parts of an Earth-orbiting satellite, placed it in a plasma wind tunnel then proceeded to melt it into vapour. Their goal was to better understand how satellites burn up during reentry, to minimise the risk of endangering anyone on the ground. Taking place as part of ESA's Clean Space initiative, the fiery testing occurred inside a plasma wind tunnel, reproducing reentry conditions, at the DLR German Aerospace Center's site in Cologne.

Life Sciences - 17.06.2019
Rinsing System in Stomach Protects the Teeth of Ruminants
Rinsing System in Stomach Protects the Teeth of Ruminants
When they graze, goats, sheep and cows often ingest bits of earth that can be damaging to their teeth. Researchers from the University of Zurich have now shown how the animals protect themselves against dental abrasion: Their stomach system rinses dust and sand off the ingested food before it is chewed for the second time.

Health - Life Sciences - 17.06.2019
Schizophrenia: adolescence is the game-changer
Schizophrenia: adolescence is the game-changer
Researchers at UNIGE have discovered that the development of the hippocampus, the area of the brain responsible for memory and emotions, is severely impacted in adolescence following the onset of the first psychotic symptoms. Schizophrenia causes hallucinations and memory or cognition problems inter alia.

Life Sciences - 16.06.2019
Neuroscientists 3D model ’face identity information’ stored in the brain
In a world first, neuroscientists from the University of Glasgow have been able to construct 3D facial models using the unique information stored in an individual's brain when recalling the face of a familiar person. The study will be the cornerstone for greater understanding of the brain mechanisms of face identification, and could have applications for AI, gaming technology and eyewitness testimony.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.06.2019
Compound with anti-aging effects passes human trial
Compound with anti-aging effects passes human trial
Urolithin A, a metabolite of biomolecules found in pomegranates and other fruits, could help slow certain aging processes. EPFL spin-off Amazentis, in conjunction with EPFL and the Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics, has published a paper Metabolism outlining the results of their clinical trial. It is a fact of life that skeletal muscles begin to lose strength and mass once a person reaches the age of 50.

Earth Sciences - 14.06.2019
How tides can trigger earthquakes
How tides can trigger earthquakes
An international team of scientists - including a volcanologist from the University of Bristol - have uncovered why underwater earthquakes are linked with the tides. Their study, published , investigates the inner workings of tidally triggered earthquakes and found that even the slightest stress can set off a tremor.

Physics - 14.06.2019
Building a Better Electron Gun
Building a Better Electron Gun
The successful test of the LCLS-II electron gun ( see related article ) marks the culmination of an R&D effort spanning more than a decade at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab). The gun's design was conceived in 2006 by John W. Staples, a retired Berkeley Lab physicist, and Fernando Sannibale, a senior scientist in Berkeley Lab's Accelerator Technology and Applied Physics Division.

Environment - Life Sciences - 14.06.2019
What drives Yellowstone’s massive elk migrations?
Yellowstone's migrating elk use climate cues, like melting snow and greening grasses, to decide when to make the trek from their winter ranges in prairies and valleys to their summer ranges in high mountain plateaus. (Joe Riis photo) Every spring, tens of thousands of elk follow a wave of green growth up onto the high plateaus in and around Yellowstone and Grand Teton national parks, where they spend the summer calving and fattening on fresh grass.

Life Sciences - 14.06.2019
Exciting Plant Vacuoles
Exciting Plant Vacuoles
06/14/2019 Researchers have filled two knowledge gaps: The vacuoles of plant cells can be excited and the TPC1 ion channel is involved in this process. The function of this channel, which is also found in humans, has been a mystery so far. Many plant processes are not different from humans: Cells and tissues in grain plants, including maize also communicate through electrical signals.

Life Sciences - Chemistry - 14.06.2019
Why does dandelion never fall ill?
Why does dandelion never fall ill?
Researchers at Münster University find out that dandelion possesses enzymes that have untypical abilities for plants / Study in "Angewandte Chemie' Plants possess enzymes called polyphenoloxidases, which can oxidize certain chemical compounds and thus produce the typical brown colour that we know, for example, from freshly cut apples.

Pharmacology - Health - 14.06.2019
New drug target for liver disease treatment
New drug target for liver disease treatment
A possible drug target for chronic liver disease has been identified by an international research collaboration involving a University of Queensland team. Professor Matt Sweet and Dr Divya Ramnath from UQ's Institute for Molecular Bioscience (IMB) worked with the study's senior author Dr Ekihiro Seki from Cedars-Sinai in Los Angeles, to identify genes linked to the progression of chronic liver disease.

Chemistry - Environment - 13.06.2019
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Carbon-neutral fuels move a step closer
Chemists at EPFL have developed an efficient process for converting carbon dioxide into carbon monoxide, a key ingredient of synthetic fuels and materials. The carbon dioxide (CO2) produced when fossil fuels are burned is normally released into the atmosphere. Researchers working on synthetic fuels - also known as carbon-neutral fuels - are exploring ways to capture and recycle that CO2.