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Results 61 - 80 of 1687.


Business / Economics - 16.04.2019
How Looking Affects Consumer Decisions
Findings published by a team of researchers from Freie Universität Berlin and Technische Universität Berlin in cooperation with the Berlin Social Science Center and Ohio State University No 100/2019 from Apr 16, 2019 Everyday decisions, like which product to buy from the shelf at the store, depend on how much time a person spends gazing at an item beforehand, according to a study.

Pharmacology - Health - 15.04.2019
Statins fail to lower cholesterol in over half of all patients
Experts have warned a more tailored approach is needed to the prescribing of statins, following a new study suggesting they are ineffective at lowering cholesterol to target levels in more than half of patients. The research by primary care experts at The University of Nottingham, which is published in Heart , found that 51.2 per cent of patients prescribed statins saw little benefit to their cholesterol levels within two years, leading to a significant risk of developing cardiovascular disease in the future.

Environment - 15.04.2019
Back from Antarctica on a sailing ship: a successful expedition!
Back from Antarctica on a sailing ship: a successful expedition!
A team of Belgian and French researchers is back from a 6-week mission studying Antarctica on a sailing ship. Key conclusions include: the benefits of this type of ship, an abundance of biodiversity, and a troubling increase in tourism. They made it back in Belgium a few days ago, after several weeks exploring the coasts of the Antarctic.

Health - 15.04.2019
Eliminating routine but low-value preoperative tests for cataract surgery patients associated with cost savings
Eliminating routine but low-value preoperative tests for cataract surgery patients associated with cost savings
FINDINGS UCLA researchers found that eliminating routine but unnecessary procedures before people undergo cataract surgery has the potential to save costs and resources for hospitals serving lower-income patients. Forgoing routine chest x-rays, electrocardiograms and other preoperative procedures — which studies have found to have no clinical benefit prior to cataract surgery — was associated with a savings of $67,241 over three years at one of the medical centers analyzed in the study.

Life Sciences - 15.04.2019
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow
Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study, led by the universities of Bristol and Oxford and published today [Monday 15 April] in the journal PNAS, found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators.

Environment - 15.04.2019
Employing 3D coral reef remote sensing to predict fish biomass
Coral reefs offer many tropical fish a vibrantly encrusted locale of refuge - a respite from the intense pressures of the sea - providing an opportunity for protection, nutrition and even reproduction. At the mercy of a warming ocean due to climate change, reefs are experiencing more frequent and damaging coral bleaching events, leaving fish (and other ocean dwellers) with barren accommodations in areas once ripe with life.

Mathematics - 15.04.2019
Support for Conservative Party rises with UK house prices
Support for Conservative Party rises with UK house prices, new research reveals The big increase in housing wealth inequality in the UK over the period from 1995 to 2007 increased homeowners' probability of supporting the Conservative party. However, it did not make homeowners more averse to the state's ownership of public services.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.04.2019
Gut bacteria work to keep us healthy
An international team of scientists, led by the University of Glasgow, have announced a new advance in our understanding of how bacteria in our gut can provide positive health benefits. The breakthrough findings, published today , provide evidence that it may be possible to design drugs that will mimic these positive health benefits in a way that might be used to treat diseases such as type II diabetes.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.04.2019
Synthetic peptide can inhibit toxicity, aggregation of protein in Alzheimer's disease, researchers show
Synthetic peptide can inhibit toxicity, aggregation of protein in Alzheimer’s disease, researchers show
Alzheimer's is a disease of aggregation. Neurons in the human brain make a protein called amyloid beta. Such proteins on their own, called monomers of amyloid beta, perform important tasks for neurons. But in the brains of people with Alzheimer's disease , amyloid beta monomers have abandoned their jobs and joined together.

Earth Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2019
Historic logging site shows first human-caused bedrock erosion along an entire river
Historic logging site shows first human-caused bedrock erosion along an entire river
Geologic time is supposed to be slow, and the most solid object should be bedrock. But new University of Washington research upends both concepts: Effects of logging show that human activity can significantly erode bedrock, causing geology to fast forward. The study, published April 15 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , focuses on the Teanaway River, a picturesque river in central Washington state.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.04.2019
Precise Decoding of Breast Cancer Cells Creates New Option for Treatment
Researchers at the University of Zurich and from IBM Research have investigated the varying composition of cancer and immune cells in over one hundred breast tumors. They've found that aggressive tumors are often dominated by a single type of tumor cell. If certain immune cells are present as well, an immune therapy could be successful for a specific group of breast cancer patients.

Chemistry - Materials Science - 15.04.2019
Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall
Best in snow: New scientific device creates electricity from snowfall
The first-of-its-kind nanogenerator designed by UCLA researchers and colleagues also acts as a weather station Stuart Wolpert UCLA researchers and colleagues have designed a new device that creates electricity from falling snow. The first of its kind, this device is inexpensive, small, thin and flexible like a sheet of plastic.

Life Sciences - Health - 15.04.2019
Genetic sequencing uncovers causes for mysterious liver disease in adults
In up to 30% of individuals with chronic liver disease, the cause is unknown. To test for possible genetic factors in such cases, Yale researchers conducted whole-exome sequencing for a small group of patients, finding specific mutations that would have otherwise been missed. The results led to accurate diagnoses and informed treatment for a subset of the patient participants, the researchers said.

Innovation / Technology - Environment - 15.04.2019
Seeking innovative ideas: space for the oceans
Seeking innovative ideas: space for the oceans
15 April 2019 ESA seeks your ideas for applying space technology to Earth-based problems. Through the Open Space Innovation Platform , a new challenge-based website, the Agency is hunting out bright ideas to monitor plastic waste polluting the oceans, and to improve the self-steering abilities of ships.

Materials Science - Environment - 15.04.2019
The wood magician
The new head of Empa's Cellulose & Wood Materials lab, Gustav Nyström, has taken everyone by surprise by setting unconventional goals. However, paper batteries and nanocellulose sensors have one main objective: to help solve fundamental, socially relevant questions. When Gustav Nyström sees a tree, he sees more than just a biological marvel.

Life Sciences - Pharmacology - 15.04.2019
Novel approach promises ready access to hard-to-study proteins
DNA and the genome, we know, provide the blueprint for life. But it is the proteins made according to the genome's instructions that are the nuts and bolts of living organisms, providing the molecular building blocks for all cells and that are critical targets for therapy. There are many different kinds of proteins that make up the human body and they are widely studied.

Life Sciences - Environment - 15.04.2019
Necrophagy: a means of survival in the Dead Sea
Necrophagy: a means of survival in the Dead Sea
UNIGE researchers have found that bacteria can survive in the sediments of the Dead Sea at a depth of over 400 metres in spite of extreme conditions. Studying organic matter in sediments helps shed light on the distant past. What was the climate like? What organisms populated the Earth? What conditions did they live in? Researchers from the University of Geneva (UNIGE), Switzerland, and the University of Lyon, France, have examined the sediments in the Dead Sea, where the salinity is without compare, making it one of the most hostile environments on the planet.

Business / Economics - 15.04.2019
Auction bids decline with intensity of competition
People bid less in auctions that have more bidders, new research suggests. Economists from the University of Sydney and the University of Technology Sydney (UTS) have co-authored a new study that challenges conventional thinking about auctions and is applicable to real-life bidding situations including property auctions.   The study suggested that the more bidders there are in an auction, the lower each individual bidder perceives their probability of winning, which has demotivating effect on their desire to win the auction.

Health - Pharmacology - 15.04.2019
Malaria and the doctor who changed the rules of treatment
Malaria and the doctor who changed the rules of treatment
The people of Burma, now Myanmar, were being devastated by conflict and drug resistant malaria, when alumna Rose McGready arrived. It was a temporary work placement that became much more than she expected. When Professor Rose McGready (MBBS '90) arrived on the Thai/Myanmar border in 1994, it had been a volatile and dangerous part of the world for many years.

Environment - 15.04.2019
Algorithms to enhance forest inventories
An EPFL doctoral student has come up with methods to map out forests more effectively using aerial remote sensing, in support of on-the-ground forest inventories. Forests are an essential component of the world's ecosystems and a key indicator of our planet's health. They provide valuable resources - like wood for construction and heating - and they filter rainwater, protect against erosion and avalanches, and can be used for numerous leisure pursuits.