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Results 81 - 100 of 1792.


Environment / Sustainable Development - Life Sciences - 08.06.2018
Nutritional quality of fish and squid reduced by warm water events
The nutritional quality of fish and squid deteriorates under warm water events, research reveals - with implications for the marine environment, marine predators and fisheries capturing food for human consumption. Research led by the University of Sydney shows that under warm water events the nutritional balance of fish and squid changes and is of lower quality, while under cold water events it is of higher quality.

Life Sciences - Environment / Sustainable Development - 08.06.2018
Monkeys eat fats and carbs to keep warm
Crave comfort foods in cooler months' You're in good company. Golden snub-nosed monkeys prefer to eat more fats and carbohydrates in winter to help generate heat, research suggests. University of Sydney researchers have found monkeys living in the wild in cold snowy habitats adjust their nutrient intake to match the elevated costs of thermoregulation.

Physics / Materials Science - 08.06.2018
3 Questions: Pinning down a neutrino's mass
3 Questions: Pinning down a neutrino’s mass
Neutrinos are everywhere, and yet their presence is rarely felt. Scientists have assumed for decades that, because they interact so little with matter, neutrinos must lack any measurable mass. But recent experiments have shown that these "ghostly" particles do in fact hold some weight. Ever since, the hunt has been on to pin down a neutrino's mass - a vanishingly small measurement that could have huge implications for our understanding of how the universe has evolved.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Physics / Materials Science - 07.06.2018
Invention could help to crack down on illegal drug trade
A research team involving ANU has invented a system that can detect chemicals in miniscule quantities and could be developed into a portable drug-testing kit to help authorities crack down on the illegal drug trade. ANU supported Switzerland's École Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, which led the project to develop this invention.

Life Sciences - 07.06.2018
Bees and the thought of naught
Bees and the thought of naught
Honeybees can conceive and interpret zero. This has just been demonstrated by a scientist from the Research Centre on Animal Cognition (CNRS / Université Toulouse III—Paul Sabatier) and her Australian colleagues, proving for the first time ever that insects are capable of mathematical abstraction. As zero, designating nothingness, neutrality, or absence, is a relatively recent concept for humans, Though some vertebrates had already been shown to master complex numerical concepts like addition and zero, no evidence of this existed for insects.

Physics / Materials Science - Chemistry - 07.06.2018
A nanotech sensor turns molecular fingerprints into bar codes
A nanotech sensor turns molecular fingerprints into bar codes
A new system developed at EPFL can detect and analyze molecules with very high precision and without needing bulky equipment. It opens the door to large-scale, image-based detection of materials aided by artificial intelligence. Infrared spectroscopy is the benchmark method for detecting and analyzing organic compounds.

Computer Science / Telecom - Mathematics - 07.06.2018
UCLA faculty voice: Artificial intelligence can't reason why
UCLA faculty voice: Artificial intelligence can’t reason why
The current data-crunching approach to machine learning misses an essential element of human intelligence Judea Pearl and Dana Mackenzie Judea Pearl is chancellor's professor of computer science and statistics at UCLA and co-author of “ The Book of Why: The Science of Cause and Effect ” with Dana Mackenzie, a mathematics writer.

Life Sciences - Social Sciences - 07.06.2018
Individual
Individual "Names" Reveal Complex Relationships in Male Bottlenose Dolphins
Dolphins are intelligent creatures that communicate with high-frequency whistles and are capable of forming strong relationships. Within their population, male dolphins enter into complex, multi-level alliances ranging from intense, lifelong friendships to loose groups. For example, during the mating season two or three males will join forces to separate a female from the group, mate with her, and fend off rivals, or even “steal” females from other groups.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Chemistry - 07.06.2018
Novel molecular designs unlock therapeutic potential of nicotine receptors
Novel molecular designs unlock therapeutic potential of nicotine receptors
Seven million people die each year from smoking related diseases, according to the World Health Organisation, with the annual death toll expected to rise to eight million by 2030. Despite a WHO target to phase out tobacco usage by 2040, smoking remains one of the biggest global public health problems, with low to middle income countries accounting for around 80 per cent of the world's estimated 1.1 billion smokers.

Life Sciences - Medicine / Pharmacology - 07.06.2018
Predicting the outcome of the arms race between man and bacteria
Predicting the outcome of the arms race between man and bacteria
Through computer simulations, scientists can predict if bacteria can be stopped with popular antibacterial therapies or not - a breakthrough which will help select and develop effective treatments for bacterial infections. Growing resistance to antibiotics is a one of the most serious global health threats we are facing.

Computer Science / Telecom - 07.06.2018
When life gives you lemons, you take more risks
When life gives you lemons, you take more risks
When life gives you lemons, you take more risks Anyone needing a little excitement in their lives could do worse than suck a lemon, surprising new research at the University of Sussex suggests. Scientists at the Sussex Computer Human Interaction ( SCHI ) Lab say they have found for the first time empirical evidence that sour tastes lead to more risk-taking behaviour in a paper published in Scientific Reports today (7 June).

Chemistry - Astronomy - 07.06.2018
3 Questions: Roger Summons on finding organic matter on Mars
3 Questions: Roger Summons on finding organic matter on Mars
NASA's Curiosity rover has found evidence of complex organic matter preserved in the topmost layers of the Martian surface, scientists report today in the journal Science . While the new results are far from a confirmation of life on Mars, scientists believe they support earlier hypotheses that the Red Planet was once clement and habitable for microbial life.

Physics / Materials Science - Chemistry - 07.06.2018
There's a New Microscope in Town: ThemIS, anyone?
There’s a New Microscope in Town: ThemIS, anyone?
By Laurie Chong Researchers at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab) now have access to a unique new microscope that combines atomic-scale imaging capabilities with the ability to observe real-world sample properties and behavior in real time. Housed at Berkeley Lab's Molecular Foundry in partnership with the Materials Sciences Division, the new instrument is a high-stability, high-resolution Thermo Fischer " ThemIS " transmission electron microscope (TEM).

Environment / Sustainable Development - Earth Sciences - 07.06.2018
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapse
Scientists propose changing the rules of history to avoid environmental collapse
For the first time in our planet's 4.5 billion-year history a single species, humans, is increasingly dictating its future, according to a new book by UCL scientists.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 07.06.2018
How a gene linked to obesity could provide new insights into diabetes
A gene previously linked with obesity has been found to affect how the body processes insulin, with potential implications for some forms of diabetes. Scientists have uncovered a number of genes which may play a role in obesity and metabolism. Previous studies suggested that variations of one of these, a gene called neuronatin (Nnat), may have a link with weight gain in children.

Medicine / Pharmacology - Mathematics - 07.06.2018
Cost and scale of field trials for bovine TB vaccine may make them unfeasible
Cost and scale of field trials for bovine TB vaccine may make them unfeasible
Field trials for a vaccine to protect cattle against bovine tuberculosis (bovine TB) would need to involve 500 herds - potentially as many as 75,000-100,000 cattle - to demonstrate cost effectiveness for farmers, concludes a study published today in the journal eLife . Our results highlight the enormous scale of trials that would be necessary to evaluate BCG alongside continuing testing in the field.

History / Archeology - 07.06.2018
Forgotten corner of Europe brought back to life thanks to artificial intelligence
Forgotten corner of Europe brought back to life thanks to artificial intelligence
A lost world in a former empire in Europe has been brought to life thanks to University of Bristol researchers who used artificial intelligence (AI) techniques to analyse 47,000 multilingual pages from newspapers dating back to 1873. The study, published in Historical Methods , aimed to discover whether historical changes could be detected from the collective content of local newspapers from the Princely County of Gorizia and Gradisca.

Social Sciences - 07.06.2018
Bad news becomes hysteria in crowds, new research shows
News stories about potential threats become more negative, inaccurate and hysterical when passed from person to person - new University of Warwick research finds Even drawing the public's attention to balanced, neutral facts does not calm this hysteria "The more people share information, the more negative it becomes, the further it gets from the facts, and the more resistant it becomes to correction" - Professor Thomas Hills News stories about t

Medicine / Pharmacology - 07.06.2018
Tonsil and adenoid removal associated with long-term risks of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases
Removing tonsils and adenoids in childhood increases the long-term risk of respiratory, allergic and infectious diseases, according to researchers who have examined - for the first time - the long-term effects of the operations.

Chemistry - Life Sciences - 07.06.2018
Copy-cat sea slugs vary in toxicity and taste
Copy-cat sea slugs vary in toxicity and taste
University of Queensland-led research found sea slugs that mimic the colours of other slugs to scare off predators do not have the same chemical defences as the species they are copying. The study led by UQ Visual Ecology Lab member Dr Anne Winters , is the first to detail chemical profiles and assess toxicity and distastefulness of nudibranchs, or sea slugs.