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Results 81 - 100 of 1825.


Earth Sciences - 14.02.2019
Satellite images reveal interconnected plumbing system that caused Bali volcano to erupt
Satellite images reveal interconnected plumbing system that caused Bali volcano to erupt
A team of scientists, led by the University of Bristol, has used satellite technology provided by the European Space Agency (ESA) to uncover why the Agung volcano in Bali erupted in November 2017 after 50 years of dormancy. Their findings, published today , could have important implications for forecasting future eruptions in the area.

Environment - 14.02.2019
Media and industry not always interested in the same topics
Media and industry not always interested in the same topics
Hardly a day went by in the summer of 2018 without a report on the continuing water scarcity at the time in Switzerland. Again and again, newspapers, radio and television were coming up with questions like: "How much water do nature, agriculture and people need?", "How can we find ways to save water?" and "Which regions have the least water reserves?" On the other hand, Swiss municipal governments, cantons, engineering firms, NGOs and public sector agencies appear to be less concerned with the relationship between water scarcity and water-saving measures.

Life Sciences - 14.02.2019
The lizard and the egg: lizards break golden rule of biology
Researchers at The Australian National University (ANU) have made a remarkable discovery about a group of lizards, and how they've managed to thrive in extreme conditions on one of the world's highest mountain ranges. The Liolaemus lizards - found mainly around South America's Andes Mountains - reproduce in a way that challenges one of biology's best known rules, Dollo's Law.

Astronomy / Space Science - Physics - 14.02.2019
Earth's atmosphere stretches out to the Moon - and beyond
Earth’s atmosphere stretches out to the Moon - and beyond
The outermost part of our planet's atmosphere extends well beyond the lunar orbit - almost twice the distance to the Moon. A recent discovery based on observations by the ESA/NASA Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, SOHO, shows that the gaseous layer that wraps around Earth reaches up to 630 000 km away, or 50 times the diameter of our planet.

Physics - Electroengineering - 14.02.2019
Giving keener
Giving keener "electric eyesight" to autonomous vehicles
On-chip system that detects signals at sub-terahertz wavelengths could help steer driverless cars through fog and dust. Autonomous vehicles relying on light-based image sensors often struggle to see through blinding conditions, such as fog. But MIT researchers have developed a sub-terahertz-radiation receiving system that could help steer driverless cars when traditional methods fail.

Health - 13.02.2019
More older people with depression could benefit from non-drug treatments
Depression is common in older age and with an ageing population how late-life depression is managed will become increasingly important. Researchers from the University of Bristol and University College London (UCL) suggest mental health in later life should be given greater priority by healthcare professionals.

Psychology - 13.02.2019
Ethnic minority children over identified with Special Education Needs (SEN)
Children of ethnic minority groups are over-represented for some types of Special Educational Needs (SEN) and under-represented for other types, compared to White British pupils, according to new Oxford University research.  The report finds that: Asian pupils (Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Other Asian) are half as likely to be identified with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) as White British pupils Black Caribbean and Mixed White & Black Caribbean pupils are twice as likely to be identified with Social, Emotional and Mental Health (SEMH) needs as White British pupils.

Psychology - 13.02.2019
Ethnic minority children not equally identified with Special Education Needs
Children of ethnic minority groups are over-represented for some types of Special Educational Needs (SEN) and under-represented for other types, compared to White British pupils, according to new Oxford University research.  The report finds that: Asian pupils (Indian, Pakistani, Bangladeshi and Other Asian) are half as likely to be identified with Autistic Spectrum Disorders (ASD) as White British pupils Black Caribbean and Mixed White & Black Caribbean pupils are twice as likely to be identified with Social, Emotional and Mental Health (SEMH) needs as White British pupils.

Life Sciences - Health - 13.02.2019
Biologist's research could lead to more resilient crops
Biologist’s research could lead to more resilient crops
UCLA biologist Steve Jacobsen's research has the potential to have a significant impact on the improvement of crops. Jacobsen, who is a professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology, specializes in plant epigenetics — the study of how a gene's function can change without changes to the DNA sequence — and his research could lead to more resilient crops.

Pedagogy - 13.02.2019
Parents don't pick favorites, at least if you're a Magellanic penguin
Parents don’t pick favorites, at least if you’re a Magellanic penguin
Parenthood can be a struggle, particularly for families with multiple children in need of care, nurturing, protection and attention. But a weary mom or dad may find solace in the reassurance that all parents with several offspring face a similar challenge - even the non-human variety. Researchers at the University of Washington wanted to know how Magellanic penguin parents in South America balance the dietary demands of multiple chicks.

Social Sciences - 13.02.2019
Violent video games found not to be associated with adolescent aggression
Researchers at the Oxford Internet Institute, University of Oxford, have found no relationship between aggressive behaviour in teenagers and the amount of time spent playing violent video games. The study used nationally representative data from British teens and their parents alongside official E.U. and US ratings of game violence.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 13.02.2019
Ambitious research to help achieve UN Sustainable Development Goals
Scientists from across five countries, including those from University of Glasgow, will collaborate on ambitious research to gain a deeper understanding of the relationship between humans and their environment in achieving the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals. The University of Glasgow project “River basins as 'living laboratories' for achieving sustainable development goals across national and sub-national scales” has been funded through the new Natural Environment Research Council-TaSE (Towards a Sustainable Earth) research programme.

Innovation / Technology - Academic Rankings - 13.02.2019
Bigger teams aren’t always better in science and tech
In today's science and business worlds, it's increasingly common to hear that solving big problems requires a big team. But a new analysis of more than 65 million papers, patents and software projects found that smaller teams produce much more disruptive and innovative research. In a new paper published by Nature , University of Chicago researchers examined 60 years of publications and found that smaller teams were far more likely to introduce new ideas to science and technology, while larger teams more often developed and consolidated existing knowledge.

Physics - Materials Science - 13.02.2019
World's finest gold specimen probed with Los Alamos neutrons
World’s finest gold specimen probed with Los Alamos neutrons
Unraveling a 132-year-old gold wire structure mystery Los Alamos, New Mexico, Feb 13, 2019-Using neutron characterization techniques a team of scientists have peered inside one of the most unique examples of wire gold, understanding for the first time the specimen's structure and possible formation process.

Environment - 13.02.2019
Turning desalination waste into a useful resource
Turning desalination waste into a useful resource
Process developed at MIT could turn concentrated brine into useful chemicals, making desalination more efficient. The rapidly growing desalination industry produces water for drinking and for agriculture in the world's arid coastal regions. But it leaves behind as a waste product a lot of highly concentrated brine, which is usually disposed of by dumping it back into the sea, a process that requires costly pumping systems and that must be managed carefully to prevent damage to marine ecosystems.

Environment - 13.02.2019
Melting water causing Antarctic ice to buckle, scientists confirm
For the first time, a team of scientists from the University of Chicago and the Cooperative Institute for Research in Environmental Sciences has directly observed an Antarctic ice shelf bending under the weight of ponding meltwater on top-a phenomenon that may have triggered the historic 2002 collapse of the Larsen B ice shelf.

Environment - 13.02.2019
Surface lakes cause Antarctic ice shelves to 'flex'
Surface lakes cause Antarctic ice shelves to ’flex’
The filling and draining of meltwater lakes has been found to cause a floating Antarctic ice shelf to flex, potentially threatening its stability. Filling and draining of lakes causes the ice shelf to flex, and if the stresses are large enough, fractures might also develop Alison Banwell A team of British and American researchers, co-led by the University of Cambridge, has measured how much the McMurdo ice shelf in Antarctica flexes in response to the filling and draining of meltwater lakes on its surface.

Environment - Life Sciences - 13.02.2019
Fate of Meerkats Tied to Seasonal Climate Effects
Fate of Meerkats Tied to Seasonal Climate Effects
Does a drier and hotter climate present a threat to the meerkats in the Kalahari Desert? Researchers from UZH and Cambridge show that climate change is likely to impact meerkats, and seasonal rainfall and temperature will be the key factors. The effects of climate change are especially obvious in arid environments where resources are scarce and subject to seasonal availability.

Life Sciences - 13.02.2019
Movement impairments in autism could be reversible
Researchers from Cardiff University have established a link between a genetic mutation and developmental movement impairments in autism . The study, which found that the mutation of the CYFIP1 gene leads to changes in the development of brain cells, leading to the motor issues, also suggests that motor learning difficulties occur at a young age and can be reversed through behavioural training.

Life Sciences - Health - 12.02.2019
Experts call for caution on reporting long-term effects of head injuries in sports
A group of over 60 leading international neuroscientists have called for caution when reporting on the potential late effects of head injuries in sport. In correspondence, published today in The Lancet Neurology, experts in research and clinical practice in brain injury from around the world have asked for balance when reporting on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).