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Results 81 - 100 of 1738.


Life Sciences - Health - 28.11.2019
Placenta changes could mean male offspring of older mums more likely to develop heart problems in later life, rat study finds
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Pharmacology - Health - 28.11.2019
Pharmacist-led interventions may help prevent cardiovascular disease
Pharmacists based in GP practices can play an integral role in the prevention of cardiovascular disease, finds new research led by the University of Birmingham. The study findings, published today in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology , support the involvement of pharmacists as healthcare providers in managing patients with hypertension, diabetes and high cholesterol.

Earth Sciences - Chemistry - 27.11.2019
Barbequed clams on the menu for ancient Puerto Ricans
Scientists have reconstructed the cooking techniques of the early inhabitants of Puerto Rico by analysing the remains of clams. Led by Philip Staudigel, who conducted the analysis as a graduate student at the University of Miami Rosenstiel School and is now a postdoctoral researcher at Cardiff University, the team has used new chemical analysis techniques to identify the exact cooking temperatures at which clams were cooked over 2500 years ago.

Life Sciences - Palaeontology - 27.11.2019
Animal embryos evolved before animals
Animal embryos evolved before animals
Animals evolved from single-celled ancestors, before diversifying into 30 or 40 distinct anatomical designs. When and how animal ancestors made the transition from single-celled microbes to complex multicellular organisms has been the focus of intense debate.

Environment - Life Sciences - 27.11.2019
Neonicotinoids: despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk
Neonicotinoids: despite EU moratorium, bees still at risk
Since 2013, a European Union (EU) moratorium has restricted the application of three neonicotinoids to crops that attract bees because of the harmful effects they are deemed to have on these insects. Yet researchers from the CNRS, INRA, and the Institut de l'Abeille (ITSAP) have just demonstrated that residues of these insecticides-and especially of imidacloprid-can still be detected in rape nectar from 48% of the plots of studied fields, their concentrations varying greatly over the years.

Health - 27.11.2019
Suggests inducing labour at 41 weeks reduces risk, says maternity expert
A University of Birmingham maternity expert says research indicates that inducing women with low-risk pregnancies at 41 weeks rather than waiting until 42 weeks reduces risk to their baby's life. Current practice in the UK and Scandinavia is to induce delivery for women who have not gone into labour by 42 weeks.

Social Sciences - Computer Science / Telecom - 27.11.2019
Researchers get 'glimpse into a human mind' as it makes choices in groups, social media
Researchers get ’glimpse into a human mind’ as it makes choices in groups, social media
The choices we make in large group settings - such as in online forums and social media - might seem fairly automatic to us. But our decision-making process is more complicated than we know. So, researchers have been working to understand what's behind that seemingly intuitive process. Now, new University of Washington research has discovered that in large groups of essentially anonymous members, people make choices based on a model of the "mind of the group" and an evolving simulation of how a choice will affect that theorized mind.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.11.2019
Researchers identify protein that governs human blood stem cell self-renewal
UCLA scientists have discovered a link between a protein and the ability of human blood stem cells to self-renew. In a study published today , the team reports that activating the protein causes blood stem cells to self-renew at least twelvefold in laboratory conditions. Multiplying blood stem cells in conditions outside the human body could greatly improve treatment options for blood cancers like leukemia and for many inherited blood diseases.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.11.2019
An electron highway headed for methanol
An electron highway headed for methanol
Making methanol just got a lot easier, now that chemists at Yale have opened up a new electron highway. The discovery, published online Nov. 27 , finds a novel solution for two chemical tasks: producing methanol - a volatile, liquid fuel that is prized by industry - and removing carbon dioxide from the atmosphere.

Chemistry - Physics - 27.11.2019
Cutting nanoparticles down to size - new study
A new technique in chemistry could pave the way for producing uniform nanoparticles for use in drug delivery systems. Scientists have been investigating how to make better use of nanoparticles in medicine for several decades. Significantly smaller than an average cell, nanoparticles are more similar in size to proteins.

Physics - Materials Science - 27.11.2019
What protects killer immune cells from harming themselves?
White blood cells, which release a toxic potion of proteins to kill cancerous and virus-infected cells, are protected from any harm by the physical properties of their cell envelopes, find scientists from UCL and the Peter MacCallum Cancer Centre in Melbourne. Until now, it has been a mystery to scientists how these white blood cells - called cytotoxic lymphocytes - avoid being killed by their own actions and the discovery could help explain why some tumours are more resistant than others to recently developed cancer immunotherapies.

Business / Economics - 27.11.2019
The dirty tricks of online shopping, designed to make you spend more
As millions of people begin their holiday shopping, they'll come across many familiar tricks online. In some cases, sites will hype limited-time deals with a countdown clock, warn you that the product you're looking at is running out of stock, or tell you that 65 people in your area have recently purchased the item.

Social Sciences - Health - 27.11.2019
Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas
Opinion: Depression - men far more at risk than women in deprived areas
For Cambridge students For our researchers Business and enterprise Colleges and Departments Email and phone search Give to Cambridge Museums and collections Undergraduate Events and open days Fees and finance Postgraduate Postgraduate courses Fees and funding Frequently asked questions International students Continuing education Executive and professional education Courses in education How the University and Colleges work Visiting the University

Health - 27.11.2019
Physiotherapy ’postcode lottery’ uncovered
New findings showed that patients are more likely to receive physiotherapy after hip or knee replacement in London and the North of England. Patients in the South West are the least likely to receive physiotherapy. The research also found a range of other factors impacted whether patients received physiotherapy - including the age of the patient, their gender and ethnicity.

Life Sciences - Health - 27.11.2019
IRB investigates the disposal mechanisms of damaged proteins
Causal Effects of Brevity on Style and Success in Social Media Faculty of Informatics Open lecture of the course Argumentation in Conflict Resolution Visiting Alumni: Loredana Padurean, Associate Dean, Asia School of Business «Quel ramo del lago di Como...». Lettura dei «Promessi Sposi» Faculty of Communication Sciences Visiting Alumni: Elia Frapolli, Freelance Consultant Course schedules Academic calendar Humans cells select, through the endoplasmic reticulum, the damaged proteins that must be destroyed quickly to avoid their accumulation, which is toxic to our organism.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pedagogy - 26.11.2019
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China's obesity problem
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China’s obesity problem
Over 30 million Chinese children, aged between seven and 18, are overweight or obese - placing them at greater risk of an early death and this number is set to rise to 50 million by 2030, caused in part by the role grandparents play in childcare. Researchers at the Universities of Birmingham and Bristol worked with Guangzhou Centre for Disease Control and Prevention, enlisting 1,641 six-year-old children across 40 primary schools in Guangzhou to evaluate the effectiveness of the CHIRPY DRAGON programme in tackling childhood obesity.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.11.2019
Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients due to increase in overdose death
Doctors should avoid co-prescribing benzodiazepines to opioid dependent patients who are being treated with methadone or buprenorphine, also known as opioid agonist treatment (OAT), due to a three-fold increase in risk of overdose death, according to a study led by researchers at the University of Bristol.

Agronomy / Food Science - Pedagogy - 26.11.2019
Schools, parents and grandparents hold key to unlocking China’s obesity problem
Educating parents and grandparents - as well as improving physical activity and the food provided at school - could hold the key to solving China's obesity pandemic, according to one of the largest trials of childhood obesity prevention in the world. Over 30 million Chinese children, aged between seven and 18, are overweight or obese - placing them at greater risk of an early death and this number is set to rise to 50 million by 2030, caused in part by the role grandparents play in childcare.

Life Sciences - Health - 26.11.2019
A protein tag to study the immune system
Researchers from VIB-Ghent Universitiy Center for Medical Biotechnology and other collaborators, developed a novel approach to better understand a basic defense mechanism of our immune system. Central is ISG15, a small protein with a role in the immune system. With the newly developed method, scientists can now identify and study proteins tagged with ISG15, allowing them to unravel its many functions in fighting disease, potentially leading to novel antimicrobial drugs.

Pharmacology - Health - 26.11.2019
One shot of ketamine could reduce problem drinking
A one-off dose of ketamine could help heavy drinkers reduce their alcohol intake, finds a new UCL experimental study. Giving a shot of ketamine to heavy drinkers after reactivating their drinking-related memories led to a rapid decrease in urges to drink and a prolonged decrease in alcohol intake over nine months, according to the study published .

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