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Results 81 - 100 of 1696.


Pharmacology - Life Sciences - 10.04.2019
Active lifestyles may help nerves to heal after spinal injuries
Active lifestyles may help nerves to heal after spinal injuries
Leading an active lifestyle may increase the likelihood of damaged nerves regenerating after a spinal cord injury. The early-stage findings , published in the journal Science Translational Medicine , come from studies in mice and rats with spinal cord injuries, in which scientists uncovered a mechanism for nerve fibres repairing after they had been damaged.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.04.2019
Wonder material: individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Wonder material: individual 2D phosphorene nanoribbons made for the first time
Tiny, individual, flexible ribbons of crystalline phosphorus have been made and measured an international collaboration, in a world first, and they could revolutionise electronics and fast-charging battery technology. Since the isolation of 2-dimensional phosphorene (the phosphorus equivalent of graphene) in 2014, more than 100 theoretical studies have predicted that new and exciting and properties could emerge by producing narrow ‘ribbons' of this material.

Astronomy / Space Science - 10.04.2019
First image of a black hole
First image of a black hole
The Event Horizon Telescope (EHT) - a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration - was designed to capture images of a black hole. Today, in coordinated press conferences across the globe, EHT researchers reveal that they have succeeded, unveiling the first direct visual evidence of a supermassive black hole and its shadow.

Life Sciences - 10.04.2019
Monkeys use different part of the brain for depth perception than human beings
Monkeys use different part of the brain for depth perception than human beings
Our brain relies on 2D information to create a 3D image of the world. Human beings use a different part of their brain to do this than monkeys, says an international team of researchers led by neurophysiologists Marcelo Armendariz and Wim Vanduffel (KU Leuven & Harvard Medical School) in collaboration with a team from Cambridge.

Health - 10.04.2019
Another way HIV can hide from vaccines
A Yale-led team has discovered yet another molecular trick HIV uses to survive immune system attacks, a finding that may influence efforts to develop an effective vaccine against HIV/AIDS. The virus forms specifically shaped structures called trimers on its surface, which are designed to attach to and infect cells and produce more HIV.

Astronomy / Space Science - Careers / Employment - 10.04.2019
Astronomers capture historic first image of a black hole
The Event Horizon Telescope -a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration-was designed to capture images of a black hole.

Health - 10.04.2019
Middle-aged men with multimorbidity at greatest risk of death
Multimorbidity - the presence of two or more long-term health conditions - has a greater impact on risk of all causes of death in middle aged men, as opposed to older populations, according to new research. The study, led by the University of Glasgow and published today in BMC Medicine , also found that multimorbidity is associated with a higher risk of death from cancer, vascular conditions and all causes of death - even after accounting for lifestyle or demographic factors.

Life Sciences - Innovation / Technology - 10.04.2019
How close are we really to 3D printing organs?
How close are we really to 3D printing organs?
3D printing technologies are now so advanced they can create structures on a nanoscale. But how close are we to seeing 3D printed organs in the market? Professor Hala Zreiqat and Dr Peter Newman explain. "It's just five to ten years away". From cures for cancer to fusion power and driverless cars, almost every technology seems to be perpetually five to ten years away.

Life Sciences - Environment - 10.04.2019
Conservation clues from scant DNA
Conservation clues from scant DNA
The challenges of collecting DNA samples directly from endangered species makes understanding and protecting them harder. A new approach promises cheap, rapid analysis of genetic clues in degraded and left-behind material, such as hair and commercial food products. The key to solving a mystery is finding the right clues.

Astronomy / Space Science - Careers / Employment - 10.04.2019
Scientists help capture first image of a black hole
The Event Horizon Telescope -a planet-scale array of eight ground-based radio telescopes forged through international collaboration-was designed to capture images of a black hole.

Astronomy / Space Science - 10.04.2019
Working together as a
Working together as a "virtual telescope," observatories around the world produce first direct images of a black hole
Images reveal supermassive black hole at the heart of the Messier 87 galaxy. Haystack research scientist speaks with Lowell Sun reporter Alana Melanson about how scientists at the Haystack Observatory made key contributions to creating the first-ever image of a black hole. "It's enormous volumes of data coming at you very, very fast - much faster than you can record on a single hard drive," says Fish of the vast quantities of data processed at Haystack to develop the image.

Health - 09.04.2019
Hepatitis C could be prevented worldwide by reducing transmission in people who inject drugs
Stepping up efforts to prevent transmission of hepatitis C among people who inject drugs, could reduce future infections by 43 per cent globally, according to a study by researchers at the University of Bristol published in the Lancet Gastroenterology and Hepatology today [Tuesday 9 April 2019]. Hepatitis C is a virus that is passed on through blood exposure and results in liver disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 09.04.2019
Scientists identify a key gene in the transmission of deadly African sleeping sickness
Study by UCLA, Swiss life scientists reveals critical insights on disease-causing parasites Stuart Wolpert Life scientists from UCLA and the University of Bern have identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness — a severe disease transmitted by the bite of infected tsetse flies, which are common in sub-Saharan Africa.

Life Sciences - 09.04.2019
New ’lab-on-a-chip’ can test thousands of stem cells simultaneously
Researchers with the Institute for Molecular Engineering at the University of Chicago have developed a new "lab-on-a-chip" that can examine thousands of individual live cells over a weeklong period, performing experiments that would take more than 1 million steps in a laboratory. The credit-card-sized, microfluidic device not only saves time and money, but also offers a new glimpse into how single stem cells react to different molecules and environments.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.04.2019
New model accurately predicts harmful space weather
New model accurately predicts harmful space weather
Predicting "killer" electrons in the Earth's outer radiation belt protects spacecraft An artist's rendering of the Van Allen radiation belts surrounding Earth. The purple, concentric shells represent the inner and outer belts. They completely encircle Earth, but have been cut away in this image to show detail.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.04.2019
Are Brown Dwarfs Failed Stars Or Super-Planets?
Are Brown Dwarfs Failed Stars Or Super-Planets?
Brown dwarfs fill the 'gap' between stars and the numerous smaller planets ' two very different types of astronomical objects. But how they originate has yet to be fully explained. Astronomers from Heidelberg University may now be able to answer that question. They discovered that the star oe Ophiuchi in the Milky Way is being orbited by two brown dwarfs, which in all probability formed along with the star from a gas and dust disk, just as planets do.

Astronomy / Space Science - 09.04.2019
Fireworks of blue lightning and gamma rays above thunderclouds
Fireworks of blue lightning and gamma rays above thunderclouds
9 April 2019 After only one year in space, the Atmosphere-Space Interactions Monitor (ASIM) on the International Space Station has given researchers a new understanding of how lightning is created, and how thunderstorms can affect the atmosphere and the climate. The first measurements from the facility that is flying 400 km above Earth outside Europe's Columbus laboratory, reveal how so-called 'terrestrial gamma-flashes' form in the atmosphere.

Health - Pharmacology - 09.04.2019
Antibiotic resistance across Wisconsin revealed by new maps
When a patient arrives at a hospital with an infection, her doctor must decide which antibiotic might have the best chance of curing her - no easy feat when disease-causing pathogens are increasingly resistant to multiple antibiotics. For that reason, hospitals often track the antibiotic resistance profiles of infectious microbes that they isolate from sick patients, which provide information on the most and least effective drugs.

Environment - 09.04.2019
The oldest ice on Earth may be able to solve the puzzle of the planet's climate history
The oldest ice on Earth may be able to solve the puzzle of the planet’s climate history
A European research consortium, in which the University of Bern is involved in, wants to drill a 1.5 million year old ice core in Antarctica. An analysis of the climate data stored in the ice should contribute to a better understanding of the alternation between warm and cold periods. As part of the EU project "Beyond EPICA - Oldest Ice", experts from 14 institutions located in 10 European countries have spent three years combing the Antarctic ice sheet to find the ideal location to retrieve the oldest ice core on the Earth.

Life Sciences - 09.04.2019
Indigenous skills vital to conservation research outcomes
Indigenous skills vital to conservation research outcomes
Sydney conservation biologists have demonstrated Indigenous rangers are an essential part of scientific research outcomes, and urge researchers around the world to give Indigenous peoples a voice. Researchers at the University of Sydney have produced hard data that demonstrates collaborating with Indigenous peoples changed the outcome of a scientific research project.