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Results 81 - 100 of 1720.


Life Sciences - Microtechnics - 11.10.2019
DeepFly3D: the deep-learning way to design fly-like robots
DeepFly3D: the deep-learning way to design fly-like robots
EPFL scientists have developed a deep-learning based motion-capture software that uses multiple camera views to model the movements of a fly in three dimensions. The ultimate aim is to use this knowledge to design fly-like robots. "Just think about what a fly can do," says Professor Pavan Ramdya, whose lab at EPFL's Brain Mind Institute , with the lab of Professor Pascal Fua at EPFL's Institute for Computer Science, led the study.

Materials Science - Physics - 11.10.2019
White blood cell 'security guard' and community messages: News from the College
White blood cell ’security guard’ and community messages: News from the College
Here's a batch of fresh news and announcements from across Imperial. From a white blood cell playing a ‘security guard' role, to the President's call for collaboration and community, here is some quick-read news from across the College. Patrolling eye Researchers from Imperial have discovered a new ‘security guard' role for a type of white blood cell called a neutrophil.

Environment - Business / Economics - 11.10.2019
Financial crises cause one-step forward, two steps back when it comes to air quality
New research has shed light on the impact of financial crises on air pollution showing that, while emissions are reduced during a financial crisis, the positive impacts are unexpectedly short-lived as new patterns of pollution emerge. A study led by Dr Andreas Antoniades and Dr Alexander Antonarakis at the University of Sussex shows that the break out of a financial crisis is associated with reductions in carbon dioxide (CO2) sulphur dioxide (SO2), and nitrogen dioxide (NO x ), and emissions.

Physics - Innovation / Technology - 11.10.2019
Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
Controlling superconducting regions within an exotic metal
Researchers at EPFL have created a metallic microdevice in which they can define and tune patterns of superconductivity. Their discovery, which holds great promise for quantum technologies of the future, has just been published in Science. Superconductivity has fascinated scientists for many years since it offers the potential to revolutionize current technologies.

Innovation / Technology - 11.10.2019
Engineering solutions for safer roads
More than 1.25 million lives are lost on roads around the world each year - a statistic a University of Queensland -led research team is aiming to tackle using engineering technology. UQ civil engineer and researcher Professor Simon Washington said the Engineering and Technology project relied on video technology, deep learning, artificial intelligence and advanced econometrics to improve road safety.

Health - Pharmacology - 10.10.2019
Cannabis Research Buds Out in New Directions, Arthritis to Insomnia
With 33 states and the District of Columbia having legalized medical marijuana, it was inevitable that there would be much talk of its therapeutic benefits, real or imagined. But lost in the equally inevitable hype has been hard scientific proof. For almost two decades, the Center for Medicinal Cannabis Research (CMCR) at UC San Diego has been conducting such research, for much of that time largely alone and often, given the controversial nature of the subject, with limited resources.

Environment - Psychology - 10.10.2019
Scientists 'must be allowed to cry' about destruction of nature
Scientists ’must be allowed to cry’ about destruction of nature
Scientists witnessing the destruction of the natural world must be supported and "allowed to cry", researchers say. In a letter published in the journal Science , three leading researchers say it is "dangerously misguided" to assume scientists are dispassionate observers. They say many scientists experience "strong grief responses" to the current ecological crisis, and there are profound risks to ignoring this emotional trauma.

Social Sciences - Law - 10.10.2019
Update ‘nearest relative’ criteria under Mental Health Act to increase patient choice
The system in place under the Mental Health Act that places decision-making powers in the hands of the nearest relatives for people who are sectioned needs to be extended to others to improve patient choice, according to new research. The study, from academics at the universities of Bath, Bristol and the University of the West of England published in the journal Health & Social Care in the Community , identifies challenges to the existing system and makes recommendations for policy-makers and practitioners.

Law - 10.10.2019
Scottish Jury Research report published
Findings from the UK's largest mock jury research project to-date have been released. Commissioned by the Scottish Government, the research was led by Ipsos MORI Scotland, with the collaboration of School of Law academics Professor Fiona Leverick and Professor James Chalmers and the University of Warwick's Professor Vanessa Munro.

Agronomy / Food Science - Health - 10.10.2019
More evidence needed to assess impact of soda taxes
Recent nationwide polls show Americans are divided about soda taxes. Overall, people tend to be more supportive of calorie-labeling and removing sugary drinks from schools, but less so for a general soda tax. It is important to gather enough evidence to inform meaningful public policy debates, as well as ensure that the evidence clearly shows soda taxes can reduce consumption and improve health outcomes before implementing them, according to a new report from the Center for Public Finance at Rice University's Baker Institute for Public Policy.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 10.10.2019
What moons in other solar systems reveal about planets like Neptune and Jupiter
What is the difference between a planet-satellite system as we have with the Earth and Moon, versus a binary planet — two planets orbiting each other in a cosmic do-si-do? I am an astronomer interested in planets orbiting nearby stars, and gas giants — Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus and Neptune in our solar system — are the largest and easiest planets to detect.

Environment - Innovation / Technology - 10.10.2019
Interactive map shows nature’s contributions to people
The researchers set out to understand where nature contributes the most to people and how many people may be affected by future changes. By 2050, up to 5 billion people could be at higher risk of water pollution, coastal storms and underpollinated crops. Nature supports people in critical ways, often at a highly local level.

Life Sciences - 10.10.2019
Sheds new light on how the brain forms and recalls memories
Neuroscientists at the University of Birmingham have proved how different parts of the human brain work together to create and retrieve episodic memory. Models suggested that, during formation of a memory, information is routed from cortex to hippocampus whilst retrieving a memory should see this information flow in reverse.

Psychology - 10.10.2019
Improving young people’s mental health
How much does social media help or hinder young people's efforts to seek support for their emotional wellbeing? What challenges do students face when accessing services and how might they navigate them? Is there sufficient support available for students with autism? These are some of the questions that lie at the heart of a series of new research projects led by the University of Bristol's Elizabeth Blackwell Institute.

Psychology - 10.10.2019
Rest may help reduce PTSD symptoms
A period of rest following a traumatic event can reduce the subsequent development of involuntary 'memory intrusions'*, one of the hallmark symptoms in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), a new UCL study has found. The study, published in Scientific Reports and funded by the European Research Council and Wellcome, suggests memory disturbances in PTSD may be ameliorated by increased 'consolidation' (a process by which memories are stored and contextualised), which could shed new light on treatment and prevention.

Pharmacology - 10.10.2019
Birmingham health research academics call for NHS to act on mental health patient feedback
Researchers from the University of Birmingham are today making a series of recommendations for improving the way that NHS mental health trusts collect and use patient feedback to improve the quality of care for mental health inpatients. As part of a collaborative study funded by NIHR, a team from the Universities of Birmingham, Warwick , Sheffield and Queen Mary University of London , together with the Mental Health Foundation interviewed staff and patients across NHS mental health trusts in England and found that few are collecting patient feedback to actively improve services.

Astronomy / Space Science - Environment - 10.10.2019
River relic spied by Mars Express
River relic spied by Mars Express
Mars may seem to be an alien world, but many of its features look eerily familiar - such as this ancient, dried-up river system that stretches out for nearly 700 kilometres across the surface, making it one of the longest valley networks on the planet. The area of Mars shown in these new images from ESA's Mars Express spacecraft lies just south of the planet's equator, and is known to have been shaped by a mix of flowing water and impacts: events where rocks sped inwards from space to collide with the martian surface.

Environment - Life Sciences - 10.10.2019
Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen
Placenta transit of an environmental estrogen
Researchers show path of zearalenone through the womb using new technology The human foetus is considered to be particularly sensitive to environmental contaminants. A team led by Benedikt Warth from the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Vienna and Tina Bürki from the Swiss Materials Science and Technology Institute, Empa, has now been able to demonstrate for the first time how the widespread food estrogen zearalenone behaves in the womb.

Health - Psychology - 10.10.2019
Aims to address suicide prevention in low- and middle-income countries
Aims to address suicide prevention in low- and middle-income countries
Future treatment and prevention of suicidal behaviour in lowand middle-income countries (LMIC) should involve a wider range of approaches beyond just the treatment of psychiatric illness, according to a new University of Bristol study published on World Mental Health Day today [Thursday 10 October] in PLOS Medicine.

Physics - Materials Science - 10.10.2019
Simple Materials Offer a Peek into the Quantum Realm
Simple Materials Offer a Peek into the Quantum Realm
As reported , a Berkeley Lab-led team of physicists and materials scientists were the first to unambiguously observe and document the unique optical phenomena that occur in certain types of synthetic materials called moiré superlattices. The new findings will help researchers understand how to better manipulate materials into light emitters with controllable quantum properties.

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