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Results 81 - 100 of 1432.

Mathematics - Social Sciences
12.09.2017
Sharp decline in poverty in U.S. despite census report
Contrary to numbers released by the U.S. Census Bureau on Sept. 12, researchers at the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy and the University of Notre Dame find that poverty has fallen sharply in the U.S. in recent decades. The U.S. Census Bureau's annual income-based poverty report provides data that inform a range of policies and issues affecting Americans from taxes to immigration to trade policy.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2017
Explaining bursts of activity in brains of preterm babies
Explaining bursts of activity in brains of preterm babies
The source of spontaneous, high-amplitude bursts of activity seen in the brains of preterm babies, which are vital for healthy development, has been identified by a team led by researchers at UCL and King's College London. In a new study published in eLife and funded by the National Institute for Health Research and the Medical Research Council, the researchers found that a specific brain region called the insula plays a major role in the generation of the spontaneous neuronal bursts.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2017
Explaining bursts of activity in preterm human brains
The source of spontaneous, high-amplitude bursts of activity seen in the brains of preterm babies, which are vital for healthy development, has been identified by a team led by researchers at UCL and King's College London. In a new study published in eLife and funded by the National Institute for Health Research and the Medical Research Council, the researchers found that a specific brain region called the insula plays a major role in the generation of the spontaneous neuronal bursts.
Physics/Materials Science - Earth Sciences
12.09.2017
Tectonic plates ’weaker than previously thought’, say scientists
Experiments carried out at Oxford University have revealed that tectonic plates are weaker than previously thought.  The finding explains an ambiguity in lab work that led scientists to believe these rocks were much stronger than they appeared to be in the natural world. This new knowledge will help us understand how tectonic plates can break to form new boundaries.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2017
Hospice care is short and may start later than needed
Older adults are admitted to hospice for short duration despite experiencing symptoms months prior to the end of life, according to a Yale-led study. The finding highlights the need for earlier hospice admission or other strategies to address increasing symptoms and disability at the end of life, the researchers said.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2017
Lab-grown bone cell breakthrough heralds new benefits for orthopaedics
Technology originally developed to detect gravitational waves is being used to generate tissue engineered bone grafts for future use in orthopaedic medicine, scientists report in a new paper published today (Tuesday 12 September). The latest development in a technique known as ‘nanokicking' has allowed scientists from the Universities of Glasgow, Strathclyde, the West of Scotland and Galway to grow three-dimensional samples of mineralised bone in the laboratory for the first time.
Life Sciences
12.09.2017
Genes linked with education and fertility depend on when and where you live
Different genes affect educational attainment and fertility in different times and places, according to new research from the University of Oxford. This means we could be missing important variations when we try to draw conclusions about the influence of genes on human behaviour, because combining data sets from vastly different countries and historical periods could muddy the waters.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2017
Radioactive Metal Complexes for Tumour Diagnosis and Therapy
A team under the direction of chemist Peter Comba is investigating radioactive metal complexes for use in the diagnosis and treatment of tumours. In their recent studies at Heidelberg University's Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, the researchers demonstrated that developing radiopharmaceutical tracers based on indium and actinium shows great promise for new radiopharmaceuticals.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2017
Standard care for breast cancer trials not always standard
New research has found that some breast cancer trials are failing to provide appropriate control group treatments, affecting the outcomes of these studies. Researchers from the University of Sydney have found that 29 percent of breast cancer clinical trials reviewed failed to provide control group treatment in line with the current standard of care.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
12.09.2017
A drone for last-centimeter delivery
A drone for last-centimeter delivery
A new drone developed at EPFL uses cutting-edge technology to deliver parcels weighing up to 500 grams.
Medicine/Pharmacology
12.09.2017
Sobering evidence on drinking during pregnancy: do we know how little is too much?
Sobering evidence on drinking during pregnancy: do we know how little is too much?
New research from the University of Bristol suggests that consuming even small amounts of alcohol in pregnancy may be linked with higher chances of having a small baby and delivering prematurely. However, researchers actually found very few studies investigating light drinking during pregnancy. The research team reviewed all the high quality scientific studies [1] they could find on the effects of drinking small amounts of alcohol during pregnancy.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
12.09.2017
Don’t believe the hype - science spin prevalent, researchers warn
More than a quarter of biomedical scientific papers may utilise practices that distort the interpretation of results or mislead readers so that results are viewed more favourably, a new University of Sydney study suggests.  Researchers from the University's multidisciplinary Charles Perkins Centre and Faculty of Pharmacy reviewed 35 published academic studies of so-called 'spin' in biomedical scientific papers - also known as 'science hype'.
Astronomy - Administration/Government
12.09.2017
Astronomers spun up by galaxy-shape finding
Scientists have measured how a galaxy's spin affects its shape - and found faster-spinning galaxies are flatter and rounder. The discovery was made sampling 845 galaxies and could help provide insights into a galaxy's past. For the first time astronomers have measured how a galaxy's spin affects its shape.
Environment/Sustainable Development
12.09.2017
Biding time could improve conservation outcomes
Strategic delays in conservation efforts could be the key to protecting more species according to researchers at The University of Queensland. The new study found instead of spending project funds immediately, conservation organisations could use the right amount of delay to improve the benefits achieved from their funding by focussing first on investment, capacity building, or monitoring and research.
Environment/Sustainable Development
12.09.2017
Palm Islands coral loss long precedes 2016 mass bleaching
Palm Islands coral loss long precedes 2016 mass bleaching
Extensive loss of branching corals and changes in coral community structure in Australia's Palm Islands region over the past century has been revealed in a new study. Dr Tara Clark of The University of Queensland Radiogenic Isotope Facility in the School of Earth and Environmental Sciences said these corals were highly sensitive to environmental change.
Life Sciences
12.09.2017
Explosion in number of known life forms
Explosion in number of known life forms
A remarkable effort from University of Queensland researchers has helped increase the number of known genomes by almost 10 per cent. UQ School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences ARC Future Fellow Professor Gene Tyson said researchers obtained 7280 bacterial and 623 archaeal genomes (genetic materials from microorganisms) from environmental samples.
Physics/Materials Science - Life Sciences
12.09.2017
Magnetic cellular
Magnetic cellular "Legos" for the regenerative medicine of the future
By incorporating magnetic nanoparticles in cells and developing a system using miniaturized magnets, researchers at the Laboratoire Matière et Systèmes Complexes (CNRS/Université Paris Diderot), in c
Physics/Materials Science - Computer Science/Telecom
11.09.2017
Quantum internet a step closer with data storage breakthrough
The effort to build a quantum computer is often described as the space race of the 21st century. Our work will allow us to build a global network to connect quantum computers. Scientists at ANU have found a new way to store quantum data long enough to share the information around a next-generation internet which promises to be impervious to hacking.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
11.09.2017
How Liver Cancer Develops
How Liver Cancer Develops
Liver cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related death and represents the fastest rising cancer worldwide. In most cases, the tumor develops in patients with chronic liver disease. Such diseases include chronic infections with hepatitis viruses or a so-called fatty liver due to nutritional or genetically caused lipometabolic disorders or an excessive consumption of alcohol.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
11.09.2017
European Commission reverses decision on drug, following QMUL research
European Commission reverses decision on drug, following QMUL research
A drug for multiple sclerosis (MS) has been granted a license by the European Commission, following evidence from Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) that it improves patients' quality of life and is safer than previously thought. MS is a degenerative disease of the central nervous system affecting more than 120,000 people in the UK and 2.5 million people globally, leading to disability and significant loss of quality of life.

 
 
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