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Chemistry - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.11.2017
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites' decision to leap to mosquitoes
Fatty molecule in human blood controls malaria parasites’ decision to leap to mosquitoes
Depletion of a fatty molecule in human blood propels malaria parasites to stop replicating and causing illness in people and instead to jump ship to mosquitoes to continue the transmission cycle, according to a new study by an international research team co-led by the University of Glasgow. The discovery, published online in Cell, answers a longstanding question about what controls this critical step in the life cycle of Plasmodium falciparum , the parasite responsible for about half a million malaria deaths worldwide each year.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Chemistry
09.11.2017
A milestone in the fight against malaria
A milestone in the fight against malaria
The malaria parasite employs an effective trick: it forces transmission from human to human as soon as the conditions in the host deteriorate. An international research team has discovered the molecule that plays a key role in this process. Malaria parasites are both dangerous and versatile. On entering the human bloodstream, they multiply exponentially.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Veterinary Science
09.11.2017
Taking Blood Using ’Push-Pull’ Method Gets Accurate Results With Fewer Pokes, Penn Study Shows
Thursday, November 9, 2017 A new study by University of Pennsylvania veterinary researchers has found that blood samples collected from an intravenous catheter using a special "mixing" technique are as accurate as those collected via venipuncture, in which a needle is used to access the vein directly.
Chemistry - Physics/Materials Science
09.11.2017
New study sheds light on how earliest forms of life evolved on Earth
A new study led by ANU has shed light on how the earliest forms of life evolved on Earth about four billion years ago. In a major advance on previous work, the study found a compound commonly used in hair bleach, hydrogen peroxide, made the eventual emergence of life possible. Lead researcher Associate Professor Rowena Ball from ANU said hydrogen peroxide was the vital ingredient in rock pores around underwater heat vents that set in train a sequence of chemical reactions that led to the first forms of life.
Medicine/Pharmacology - Life Sciences
09.11.2017
Very low calorie diet can reverse type 2 diabetes
In a new study, a Yale-led research team uncovers how a very low calorie diet can rapidly reverse type 2 diabetes in animal models. If confirmed in people, the insight provides potential new drug targets for treating this common chronic disease, said the researchers. The study is published in Cell Metabolism.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
09.11.2017
New DNA antenatal screening for Down's syndrome is a 'transformational advance'
New DNA antenatal screening for Down’s syndrome is a ’transformational advance’
Scientists at Queen Mary University of London (QMUL) have shown for the first time that it is possible to incorporate DNA analysis into antenatal screening for three serious chromosome disorders, including Down's syndrome, in a way that is far more accurate, and safer and less stressful for mothers.
Life Sciences
09.11.2017
Deep-sea fish reveals twilight vision trick
Deep-sea fish reveals twilight vision trick
A new type of cell has been found in the eye of a deep-sea fish, and scientists say the discovery opens a new world of understanding about vision in a variety of light conditions. University of Queensland scientists found the new cell type in the deep-sea pearlside fish ( Maurolicus spp. ), which have an unusual visual system adapted for twilight conditions.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering
09.11.2017
New method developed to 3D print fully functional electronic circuits
Researchers at the University of Nottingham have pioneered a breakthrough method to rapidly 3D print fully functional electronic circuits. The circuits, which contain electrically-conductive metallic inks and insulating polymeric inks, can now be produced in a single inkjet printing process where a UV light rapidly solidifies the inks.
Life Sciences
08.11.2017
The key to a nut
The key to a nut
The Goffin's cockatoo is not a specialised tool user in the wild but has shown the capacity to invent and use different types of tools in captivity. Now cognitive biologists from the University of Vienna and the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna tested these parrots in a tool use task, requiring the birds to move objects in relation to a surface.
Physics/Materials Science - Business/Economics
08.11.2017
A new bio-robot
A new bio-robot
With a new method for modifying antibodies, drugs are developped showing more stability and, thus, having fewer side-effects. At the time Spycher, a postdoctoral radiopharmaceutical researcher at the Paul Scherrer Institute PSI, was concerned with the question of how active agents could be bound to antibodies more efficiently.
Medicine/Pharmacology
08.11.2017
Breast cancer study suggests review of treatment length
A new study published in the New England Journal of Medicine , funded by Cancer Research UK, has found that the risk of breast cancer recurring persists undiminished for at least 20 years after diagnosis, suggesting that hormonal treatments should continue for even longer to reduce the risk of late recurrence.
Medicine/Pharmacology
08.11.2017
What Can Twitter Reveal About People With ADHD? Penn Researchers Provide Answers
What Can Twitter Reveal About People With ADHD? Penn Researchers Provide Answers
What can Twitter reveal about people with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder, or ADHD? Quite a bit about what life is like for someone with the condition, according to findings published by University of Pennsylvania researchers Sharath Chandra Guntuku and Lyle Ungar in the Journal of Attention Disorders .
Physics/Materials Science
08.11.2017
New Study: Scientists Narrow Down the Search for Dark Photons Using Decade-Old Particle Collider Data
New Study: Scientists Narrow Down the Search for Dark Photons Using Decade-Old Particle Collider Data
In its final years of operation, a particle collider in Northern California was refocused to search for signs of new particles that might help fill in some big blanks in our understanding of the universe. A fresh analysis of this data, co-led by physicists at the Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (Berkeley Lab), limits some of the hiding places for one type of theorized particle - the dark photon, also known as the heavy photon - that was proposed to help explain the mystery of dark matter.
Microtechnics/Electroengineering - Computer Science/Telecom
08.11.2017
A robotic spy among the fish
A new miniature robot developed by EPFL researchers can swim with fish, learn how they communicate with each other and make them change direction or come together. These capabilities have been proven on schools of zebrafish. Researchers at EPFL's Robotic Systems Laboratory (LSRO), which is headed by Professor Francesco Mondada, have developed a miniature robot that can integrate perfectly into schools of zebrafish.
Chemistry - Microtechnics/Electroengineering
08.11.2017
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Sensors applied to plant leaves warn of water shortage
Forgot to water that plant on your desk again? It may soon be able to send out an SOS. MIT engineers have created sensors that can be printed onto plant leaves and reveal when the plants are experiencing a water shortage. This kind of technology could not only save neglected houseplants but, more importantly, give farmers an early warning when their crops are in danger, says Michael Strano, the Carbon P. Dubbs Professor of Chemical Engineering at MIT and the senior author of the new study.
Media - Politics
08.11.2017
Strong Digital Well-Being in Switzerland
Strong Digital Well-Being in Switzerland
Reading the news, posting holiday pictures, or watching cat videos on YouTube - the internet can be used for many things.
Physics/Materials Science - Chemistry
08.11.2017
Tomb-raided quantum theory opens way to improved biosensing
Hydrogen-based solar energy storage and biosensing techniques could be dramatically improved after University of Sydney researchers show the validity of theory first proposed in 1931. Researchers at the University of Sydney have applied quantum techniques to understanding the electrolysis of water, which is the application of an electric current to H 2 O to produce the constituent elements hydrogen and oxygen.
Physics/Materials Science - Mechanical Engineering/Mechanics
08.11.2017
Liquid shock absorbers
Liquid shock absorbers
Researchers have determined how certain liquids stiffen in response to powerful impacts. At first glance, colloids resemble homogeneous liquids such as milk or blood plasma. But in fact they consist of particles in suspension. Some colloids have remarkable properties: they may stiffen following an impact and absorb surface shocks.
Life Sciences - Medicine/Pharmacology
08.11.2017
Tiny silicon probes provide high definition recording of brain activity
Tiny silicon probes provide high definition recording of brain activity
A team involving UCL scientists has developed a new device that could revolutionise our understanding of the brain by allowing researchers to map the activity of complex neural networks that control behaviour and decision making, in a way never before possible. The Neuropixels probes are described in a paper .
Life Sciences - Physics/Materials Science
08.11.2017
Height and weight evolved at different speeds in the bodies of our ancestors
Height and weight evolved at different speeds in the bodies of our ancestors
The largest study to date of body sizes over millions of years finds a "pulse and stasis" pattern to hominin evolution, with surges of growth in stature and bulk occurring at different times. At one stage, our ancestors got taller around a million years before body mass caught up.

 
 
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