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Health - 03.04.2024
Why heart rhythm problems tend to happen early in the morning
Researchers have uncovered why people are more likely to have heart arrhythmia first thing in the morning. Many studies have shown that potentially lethal heart rhythm disturbances ('ventricular arrhythmia') are more likely to occur in the morning, when people wake after a night's sleep, but until now the trigger mechanism has not been fully understood.

Pharmacology - Health - 03.04.2024
New Discovery Unravels Malaria Invasion Mechanism
New Discovery Unravels Malaria Invasion Mechanism
A recent breakthrough sheds light on how the malaria parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, invades human red blood cells. The study, led by the Swiss Tropical and Public Health Institute (Swiss TPH) and Griffith University's Institute for Glycomics, reveals the role of a sugar called sialic acid in this invasion process.

Life Sciences - Environment - 03.04.2024
Plastic-free vegan leather that dyes itself grown from bacteria
Researchers at Imperial College London have genetically engineered bacteria to grow animaland plastic-free leather that dyes itself. In recent years, scientists and companies have started using microbes to grow sustainable textiles or to make dyes for industry - but this is the first time bacteria have been engineered to produce a material and its own pigment simultaneously.

History / Archeology - 03.04.2024
Finds at Schöningen show wood was crucial raw material 300,000 years ago
Finds at Schöningen show wood was crucial raw material 300,000 years ago
Research team discovers sophisticated processing of archaeological wood During archaeological excavations in the Schöningen open-cast coal mine in 1994, the discovery of the oldest, remarkably well-preserved hunting weapons known to humanity caused an international sensation. Spears and a double-pointed throwing stick were found lying between animal bones about ten meters below the surface in deposits at a former lakeshore.

Environment - 03.04.2024
California leads U.S. emissions of little-known greenhouse gas
California leads U.S. emissions of little-known greenhouse gas
The state emits more of the common pesticide sulfuryl fluoride than the rest of country combined, a Johns Hopkins study finds California, a state known for its aggressive greenhouse gas reduction policies, is ironically the nation's greatest emitter of one: sulfuryl fluoride. As much as 17% of global emissions of this gas, a common pesticide for treating termites and other wood-infesting insects, stem from the United States.

Mechanical Engineering - 03.04.2024
Control technology as a breakwater
Researchers have discovered how sloshing movements can be actively suppressed during the highly dynamic transportation of liquids . In highly automated industrial processes, machines, materials and goods are often moved very quickly. It is important that these movements are carried out precisely and safely.

Computer Science - 03.04.2024
Machine learning enables viability of vertical-axis wind turbines
Machine learning enables viability of vertical-axis wind turbines
Researchers have used a genetic learning algorithm to identify optimal pitch profiles for the blades of vertical-axis wind turbines, which despite their high energy potential, have until now been vulnerable to strong gusts of wind. If you imagine an industrial wind turbine, you likely picture the windmill design, technically known as a horizontal-axis wind turbine (HAWT).

Social Sciences - Pedagogy - 03.04.2024
Puppets could offer valuable support for autistic teenagers
Puppets could offer valuable support for autistic teenagers
Puppets could potentially provide autistic teens with a tool to communicate, express their identity and interact socially in ways that are uniquely their own, according to a new study by Dr Olivia Karaolis, lecturer in special and inclusive education. Ms Katherine Hannaford, a teacher librarian at Macquarie Fields High School in Sydney has been teaching students with autism for 20 years and is an expert in puppet making and play-based learning.

Chemistry - Environment - 03.04.2024
New Method for Storing and Processing Hydrogen Chloride Paves the Way for Safer, More Sustainable Hydrogen and Base Chemical Production
Hydrogen chloride can now be stored, processed, and electrolyzed safely thanks to breakthrough by research team at Freie Universität Berlin A research team at Freie Universität Berlin led by Professor Sebastian Hasenstab-Riedel has successfully developed a method for storing and electrolyzing gaseous hydrogen chloride in the form of an ionic liquid.

Social Sciences - Health - 03.04.2024
Netflix misses the mark by trivializing teenagers' pain
Netflix misses the mark by trivializing teenagers’ pain
UCalgary-led research discovers movies and TV series aimed at adolescents reinforce gender and racialized pain stereotypes. Researchers at the University of Calgary and the University of Bath, U.K., are calling on Netflix to do a better job of representing the kind of pain typically experienced by 12- to 18-year-olds.

Astronomy / Space - Environment - 03.04.2024
How NASA Spotted El Niño Changing the Saltiness of Coastal Waters
How NASA Spotted El Niño Changing the Saltiness of Coastal Waters
Rivers can flush rainwater over hundreds of miles to the sea, changing the makeup of coastal waters in ways that scientists are still discovering. In this satellite image from December 2023, a large, sediment-rich plume from the Mississippi River spre. Credit: NASA/OB.DAAC" New findings have revealed a coastal realm highly sensitive to changes in runoff and rainfall on land.

Physics - Chemistry - 03.04.2024
'neutronic molecules'
’neutronic molecules’
Study shows neutrons can bind to nanoscale atomic clusters known as quantum dots. The finding may provide insights into material properties and quantum effects. Neutrons are subatomic particles that have no electric charge, unlike protons and electrons. That means that while the electromagnetic force is responsible for most of the interactions between radiation and materials, neutrons are essentially immune to that force.

Life Sciences - Earth Sciences - 03.04.2024
A new computational technique could make it easier to engineer useful proteins
MIT researchers plan to search for proteins that could be used to measure electrical activity in the brain. To engineer proteins with useful functions, researchers usually begin with a natural protein that has a desirable function, such as emitting fluorescent light, and put it through many rounds of random mutation that eventually generate an optimized version of the protein.

Life Sciences - Environment - 02.04.2024
How green algae and bacteria together contribute to climate protection
How green algae and bacteria together contribute to climate protection
Microscopic algae play a significant role in binding carbon dioxide and are therefore of great ecological importance. In nature, microalgae have coexisted with bacteria for many millions of years. Bacteria can either harm algae or promote their growth. A research team at Friedrich Schiller University Jena, Germany has now found a bacterium that forms a team with a green alga.

Life Sciences - Paleontology - 02.04.2024
Temple bones in the skulls of dinosaurs and humans alike were formed by feeding habits
Temple bones in the skulls of dinosaurs and humans alike were formed by feeding habits
Whether human or reptile: in the skull of most terrestrial vertebrates there is a gaping hole in the temple; in the case of most reptiles, there are two. Scientists have been looking for explanations for this for 150 years. A team of researchers from the University of Tübingen and Ruhr University Bochum has now shown that the forces acting on the skull change depending on how and where food is held, bitten and chewed in the mouth - and over millions of years, these factors lead to the formation of connections and openings in the skull.

Life Sciences - Mathematics - 02.04.2024
How the brain senses body position and movement
How the brain senses body position and movement
Researchers at EPFL use neural networks to study proprioception, the sense the brain uses to "know" the body's movement and position. How does your brain know the position and movement of your different body parts? The sense is known as proprioception, and it is something like a "sixth sense", allowing us to move freely without constantly watching our limbs.

Social Sciences - Campus - 02.04.2024
Characterizing social networks
A new method to measure homophily in large group interactions offers insights into how groups might interact in the future. People tend to connect with others who are like them. Alumni from the same alma mater are more likely to collaborate over a research project together, or individuals with the same political beliefs are more likely to join the same political parties, attend rallies, and engage in online discussions.

Life Sciences - 02.04.2024
How and why animals can live alongside humans
How and why animals can live alongside humans
New study suggests animals can live alongside humans-if they are risk-analysis experts New research suggests animals can thrive in human-dominated environments by being expert judges of risk.

Agronomy / Food Science - Life Sciences - 02.04.2024
Corn reduces arsenic toxicity in soil
Corn reduces arsenic toxicity in soil
When crops grow in arsenic-contaminated soil, this toxic element accumulates in the food chain. A study involving the University of Basel has now discovered a mechanism used by corn plants to reduce arsenic uptake: the key factor is a special substance released into the soil by the roots. Arsenic is a toxic metalloid of natural origin.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 02.04.2024
Strengthening Swiss hydropower with science
Strengthening Swiss hydropower with science
Researchers at ETH Zurich led by Robert Boes are developing specific solutions to optimise electricity production from Swiss hydropower plants. This will ensure that hydropower remains the backbone of Switzerland's electricity supply in the future. "Although Swiss hydropower is a proven technology, we must constantly work on optimising it.
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