news

Categories


Years
2008 | 2009 | 2010 | 2011 | 2012 | 2013 | 2014 | 2015 | 2016 | 2017 | 2018 | 2019 | 2020 | 2021 | 2022 | 2023 | 2024 |


Last News


Results 121 - 140 of 2198.
« Previous 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 110 Next »


Health - Life Sciences - 05.07.2024
Why Aortic Aneurysms Form at the Arch or in the Abdominal Segment
The sites where vascular aneurysms typically form have a predilection from the outset, even in healthy people. This is shown by a study conducted by medical researchers from Bochum and Bonn. A vascular dilatation in the aorta can be life-threatening if it bursts. These so-called aortic aneurysms typically form in the same sites of the large blood vessel: either on the upper arch or in the abdominal cavity.

Materials Science - Chemistry - 05.07.2024
Innovative battery design: more energy and less environmental impact
Innovative battery design: more energy and less environmental impact
A new electrolyte design for lithium metal batteries could significantly boost the range of electric vehicles. Researchers at ETH Zurich have radically reduced the amount of environmentally harmful fluorine required to stabilise these batteries. Lithium metal batteries are among the most promising candidates of the next generation of high-energy batteries.

Pedagogy - 05.07.2024
Whether Children Lie Depends on the Social Environment
Whether Children Lie Depends on the Social Environment
Parents and upbringing play a major role in determining how often children lie. This behavior can be positively influenced with simple measures. This is shown by a new study by economists from Würzburg, Bonn and Oxford. Everyone lies - some more, some less. Children are no different. An international team of economists has now investigated the influence of the parental home and upbringing.

Physics - Electroengineering - 05.07.2024
A 2D device for quantum cooling
A 2D device for quantum cooling
EPFL engineers have created a device that can efficiently convert heat into electrical voltage at temperatures lower than that of outer space. The innovation could help overcome a significant obstacle to the advancement of quantum computing technologies, which require extremely low temperatures to function optimally.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.07.2024
COVID-19 at the university: A story that keeps unfolding
Early in the pandemic, scientists at the University of Luxembourg started to use their expertise to better understand the virus, its acute symptoms and longer-term consequences, and find effective responses against its propagation. Even if the crisis has passed, researchers are still investigating different aspects of the disease.

Environment - Computer Science - 05.07.2024
How Cities Can Adapt to Climate Change with Artificial Intelligence
The Freiburg project 'I4C - Intelligence for Cities' has developed locally precise climate models and foundations for planning tools Urban spaces are particularly susceptible to the effects of climate change, such as heat waves, floods, and storms. But which areas of a city are affected, and how can city planners respond? 'I4C - Intelligence for Cities' is an interdisciplinary project conducted by the University of Freiburg and several Fraunhofer Institutes.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.07.2024
A better understanding of Alzheimer's disease: A study confirms the utility of caffeine as treatment avenue
A better understanding of Alzheimer’s disease: A study confirms the utility of caffeine as treatment avenue
In France, 900 000 people have Alzheimer's disease or a related condition. The risk of developing Alzheimer's depends on genetic and environmental factors. Among these factors, various epidemiological studies suggest that the regular consumption of moderate amounts of caffeine slows age-related cognitive decline and the risk of developing the disease.

Life Sciences - Health - 05.07.2024
Alzheimer's disease: caffeine as a treatment option
Alzheimer’s disease: caffeine as a treatment option
In France, 900,000 people suffer from Alzheimer's or a related disease. The risk of developing Alzheimer's disease depends on genetic and environmental factors. Among the latter, various epidemiological studies suggest that regular, moderate caffeine consumption slows age-related cognitive decline and the risk of developing Alzheimer's disease.

Health - Life Sciences - 05.07.2024
Way to protect microbes from extreme conditions
Way to protect microbes from extreme conditions
By helping microbes withstand industrial processing, the method could make it easier to harness the benefits of microorganisms used as medicines and in agriculture. Microbes that are used for health, agricultural, or other applications need to be able to withstand extreme conditions, and ideally the manufacturing processes used to make tablets for long-term storage.

Health - Life Sciences - 04.07.2024
Scientists map how deadly bacteria evolved to become epidemic
Scientists map how deadly bacteria evolved to become epidemic
Pseudomonas aeruginosa - an environmental bacteria that can cause devastating multidrug-resistant infections, particularly in people with underlying lung conditions - evolved rapidly and then spread globally over the last 200 years, probably driven by changes in human behaviour, a new study has found.

Environment - Architecture - 04.07.2024
Cool roofs are best at beating cities' heat
Cool roofs are best at beating cities’ heat
Painting roofs white or covering them with a reflective coating would be more effective at cooling cities like London than vegetation-covered "green roofs," street-level vegetation or solar panels, finds a new study led by UCL researchers. Conversely, extensive use of air conditioning would warm the outside environment by as much as 1 degree C in London's dense city centre, the researchers found.

Environment - Earth Sciences - 04.07.2024
Grasses in the Fog: Plants Support Life in the Desert
Grasses in the Fog: Plants Support Life in the Desert
Researchers from the Senckenberg Centre for Human Evolution and Palaeoenvironment (SHEP) at the University of Tübingen and the Senckenberg Natural History Museum in Görlitz have studied the role of the desert grass Stipagrostis sabulicola in the African Namib Desert. In their study, published in the journal Scientific Reports , they show that the plant is able to absorb moisture from fog events and thus forms an essential basis of an - altogether unexpectedly complex - food web in the drought-stricken landscape.

Health - Pharmacology - 04.07.2024
New anti-aging therapy identified
New anti-aging therapy identified
Scientists from USI in collaboration with italian scientists have made a significant discovery by identifying a novel anti-aging therapeutic. The study is published in the prestigious journal "Nature Aging". Aging is a primary risk factor for the development of numerous chronic diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, arthritis, chronic kidney disease and cancer.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.07.2024
Protecting biodiversity on a global scale: ready-to-use genetic diversity indicators
Genetic diversity is fundamental to the maintenance and resilience of species and ecosystems. In the context of the Kunming-Montreal Global Biodiversity Framework (CMBKM), of which France is a signatory, an international consortium, including INRAE, Claude Bernard Lyon 1 University and the Conservatoire d'espaces naturels d'Occitanie, has developed and demonstrated the feasibility of using 2 genetic diversity indicators based on existing and available data without the need for DNA.

Life Sciences - Environment - 04.07.2024
New piranha species discovered in Bolivia
New piranha species discovered in Bolivia
A team of biologists, with the participation of the Universidad Autónoma de Madrid (UAM), has discovered a new species of piranha in the upper Madeira River system in Bolivia. The newly identified Serrasalmus magallanesi adds a new link to the rich biodiversity of the Amazon basin. This finding underscores the importance of continuing research on the region's ichthyofauna for its proper conservation.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.07.2024
How our brain decodes other people's gaze
How our brain decodes other people’s gaze
A team from the University of Geneva has succeeded in determining the exact moment when the brain detects another person's gaze direction. The gaze plays a central role in everyday social interactions. Our capacity for instant communication relies on the brain's ability to detect and interpret the direction of others' gaze.

Environment - 04.07.2024
Researchers listen to the hearts of bats in flight
Researchers listen to the hearts of bats in flight
Researchers from Konstanz have measured the heart rate of bats over several days in the wild, including complete flights - the first time this has been done for a bat species. To record the heart rate of male common noctule bats during flight, the scientists attached heart rate transmitters weighing less than one gram to the animals, which they then accompanied in an airplane while the bats flew, sometimes for more than an hour, in search of food.

Environment - Innovation - 04.07.2024
Cutting-edge technology detects nanoplastics in water - instantly
A McGill-led research team has developed the first real-time, on-site technology capable of detecting and deciphering nanoplastics from all'other particles in water, a capacity akin to being able to find a needle in a haystack within milliseconds. Microplastic pieces are between 1 micrometre and 5 millimetres, roughly equivalent to a grain of rice.

Life Sciences - Health - 04.07.2024
AI matches protein interaction partners
Scientists at EPFL unveil DiffPALM, an innovative AI method that enhances the prediction of protein interactions and our understanding of biological processes potentially relevant to medical applications. Proteins are the building blocks of life, involved in virtually every biological process. Understanding how proteins interact with each other is crucial for deciphering the complexities of cellular functions, and has significant implications for drug development and the treatment of diseases.

Sport - 03.07.2024
’Open-washing’ generative AI: how Meta, Google and others feign openness
The past year has seen a steep rise in generative AI systems that claim to be open. But how open are they really? New research shows there's widespread practice of 'open-washing' by companies like Meta and Google: claiming brownie points for openness while evading actual scrutiny. The question of what counts as open source in generative AI takes on particular importance in light of the EU AI Act that regulates "open source" models differently, creating an urgent need for practical openness assessment.
« Previous 1 ... 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 ... 110 Next »